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Neil Peart and Alex Van Halen Drums kits auction/for sale  

jszfunk
(@jszfunk)
World Class Peach

https://www.blabbermouth.net/news/neil-pearts-rush-drum-kit-used-from-1974-until-1977-is-being-auctioned/

NEIL PEART's RUSH Drum Kit Used From 1974 Until 1977 Is Being Auctioned

Bonhams is auctioning off the drum kit that late RUSH drummer Neil Peart used on tour and in the studio with the band from 1974 through 1977.

Although RUSH had formed as early as 1968 and had even released its eponymous debut album, it wasn't until original drummer John Rutsey left and Peart stepped in that the band's flame was truly ignited. It went from a blues and hard rock band whose first album was considered derivative of LED ZEPPELIN to a platinum-selling progressive rock powerhouse. Peart not only provided the basis for more complex song structures with his masterful drumming, but by taking over as a lyricist, he freed bassist/vocalist Geddy Lee and guitarist Alex Lifeson from a duty they had never wanted so that they could focus on bringing the collective musicianship to another level.

Peart reportedly arrived at his July 1974 audition with RUSH in a battered car, wearing shorts and transporting his drum kit in trash cans. Lee and Peart hit it off instantly, although it took Lifeson a bit longer to warm to warm to the drummer. Still, they eventually agreed to invite Peart into the band on July 29 of that year, two weeks before the group's first U.S. tour. Peart purchased a silver Slingerland drum kit from local music store Long & McQuade that he used on his first show with the band, opening for URIAH HEEP and MANFRED MANN'S EARTH BAND at the Civic Arena in Pittsburgh on August 14, 1974. He played this kit on the breakthrough "Fly By Night", "Caress Of Steel" and "2112", considered among the greatest progressive rock albums of all time. Probably the highest-profile live appearance of the kit was the three-night performance at Toronto's Massey Hall when the band's first live album "All The World's A Stage" was recorded. Peart was introduced at those shows as "the Professor on the drum kit" and his extended drum solo on "Working Man", played on the Slingerland kit, is legendary among fans.

"All The World's A Stage" marked the end of RUSH's first chapter and Peart's Slingerland drum kit was soon afterward retired. RUSH had gone from LED ZEPPELIN wannabes to a U.S. Top 40-charting band with a distinctive sound poised to win fans the world over. The Slingerland kit had been on the road for five consecutive U.S. and Canadian tours and was seen by thousands of fans from 1974 through 1977. Neil retired the kit at that time and placed it in storage where it sat until it was brought out a decade later as a prize in Modern Drummer magazine's "Neil Peart Drumset Giveaway."

https://www.blabbermouth.net/news/alex-van-halens-stage-played-1980-drum-kit-can-be-yours-for-275000/

ALEX VAN HALEN's Stage-Played 1980 Drum Kit

 

Alex Van Halen's stage-played complete drum kit, which he used on VAN HALEN 1980 "Invasion" tour, is available for purchase from Reverb.com for $275,000. A portion of proceeds will go to charity.

The white Ludwig kit (see video below), which was used on more than 100 shows during the tour in support of VAN HALEN's "Women And Children First" album, was previously displayed at Cleveland, Ohio's Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame And Museum starting around nine years ago. Alex used the drum kit not only as a percussion instrument, but also as a visual art form. Working with various drum manufacturers, Alex custom-designed enormous and elaborate drum kits that reflected the group's musical sensibility and provided Alex the platform to shine. The kit features two custom articulated bass drums, each more than five feet long, in addition to an impressive array of floor toms, tom-toms, a gong and myriad cymbals.

Alex and his brother Eddie Van Halen formed a band called MAMMOTH in Pasadena, California in 1972, then renamed it VAN HALEN when singer David Lee Roth joined the group and, later, bassist Michael Anthony.

VAN HALEN was one of the biggest rock bands in the country in the 1980s, with hits like "Runnin' With The Devil", "Dance The Night Away", "Hot For Teacher", "Panama" and "Jump". The group, which later featured Sammy Hagar on vocals, was inducted into the Rock And Roll Hall Of Fame in 2007.

The Van Halen family moved to Pasadena after emigrating to the U.S. from the Netherlands in 1962.

ALEX VAN HALEN's Stage-Played 1980 Drum Kit Can Be Yours For $275,000

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Topic starter Posted : November 23, 2020 8:51 am
robertdee
(@robertdee)
Extreme Peach

$275 thousand is a lot for a drum set. But it is very historic so I imagine someone with the bucks will grab it. Neil Peart seem to have 75 drums the few times I saw Rush. But when he did that jazz tour with the Buddy Rich Band after Buddy died, Peart played with a small kit just like Buddy and all the jazz and big band greats did. Butch and Jaimoe had small kits in the original ABB. Snare, one mounted tom, one or two floor toms,  bass drum ( Jaimoe's bass drum was tiny as I remember it) and symbols.

Now if you want to buy something expensive, Eric Clapton's guitar he played slide guitar for years is for sale.  It's a 1954 Fender Stratocaster Hardtail tobaccoburst still in originial condition with the initials of the artisan who carefully made the neck stamped on it. It says Clapton kept this guitar tuned in open G.  I didn't know Clapton had a guitar dedicated to slide playing only. 

Anyway they are asking......(drum roll) 1 million dollars!!!!!  

I would buy it except I just spent over a million on two of Eddie Van Halen's guitars. Wait. I'm sorry. That was a dream and I ain't got no one million dollars:(

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Posted : November 24, 2020 9:35 am
Chain
(@chain)
Peach Extraordianire

@robertdee

 

I recall reading an interview many years ago with EVH in which he mentioned that he had just purchased two ‘59 Gibson Les Paul guitars with some of the proceeds he earned from one of the early Van Halen tours...He explained to the reporter that he thought they’d be a good investment and were locked away in a very secure location.

As I understand it, he was right given I believe the ‘59 is very rare and VERY valuable...

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Posted : November 24, 2020 11:01 am
robertdee
(@robertdee)
Extreme Peach

Yes I remember that too. Eddie had dozens of electric guitars. The first time I saw then Eddie played a Les Paul Goldtop on one song. The rest of the songs he used two Fender Stratocaster guitars but they were clearly modified.  Did not sound like the Strats in The Ventures.  

I later read Eddie didn't like Les Paul guitars except he liked the big humbucker pickups.  The next time I saw the band Eddie had his famous Frankenstrat on most songs.  It's been many years ago but it was a Stratocaster body and neck but the pickups were one big humbucker I think and he got that out of a Les Paul? I think that is right. Apparently another pickup was fake as were some switches so to confuse people trying to copy it and much more of the guitar was modified by Eddie. Basically what he wanted was a big fat tone but a whammy bar and a Strat neck. But that guitar had a heck of a tone and was loud but it didn't sound like a Les Paul to me. 

Eddie was never happy with the guitars made by Gibson and Fender. Later he went with so call superstrats by Hamer and Kramer etc but apparently didn't get the axe just right until he came out with his own line of EVH guitars. I've also read about his amps and entire rig. Eddie was also looking to improve and trying new things. A very picky tone,  neck, whammy bar and rig guy. 

You can't argue with him though. He certainly was successful, very wealthy and turned heads. I got tired of the double two hand tapping but man for years he had every young player trying to sound like him just as Hendrix did in the late 60's and early 70's. 

Like him or not Eddie was the Michael Jordan of guitar players back then.

RIP. 

I think it was the heavy smoking and not holding his self made metal picks in his mouth that got him. Yes Eddie didn't even like the picks one could buy. It went well beyond what Gibson and Fender had for guitars.

Did you read when he died at age 65 of throat cancer it had spread to his lungs and brain. Wolfgang said if Eddie had not flew often to Germany for those treatments Eddied would have died some years earlier. Wolfgang thinks they gave him about 2 more years with his dad.

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Posted : November 24, 2020 11:57 am
Chain
(@chain)
Peach Extraordianire

Wolfgang discussed the whole guitar pick cancer thing on Stern’s show....I got the impression Ed was convinced his tongue cancer, which was cut from his tongue, was caused by sucking on the metal pick.  But I also got the impression Ed knew, as did those around him, that his later diagnosis of throat and eventually lung cancer was caused by years of smoking.

I dare say snorting high quality cocaine for years on end may have also contributed to cancer given it too is highly carcinogenic given the way it’s bleached and processed.  Even the vaporizer Ed used in place of cigarettes the past several years was not a completely benign method of ingesting nicotine given the way the concentrate is manufactured. The vapor itself is less toxic than smoke, but it’s still harmful to the mouth, throat, and lungs....Either way, it no doubt was a very painful last few years for EVH, sadly...

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Posted : November 25, 2020 11:48 am
CanadianMule
(@canadianmule)
Peach Extraordianire
Posted by: @robertdee

Yes I remember that too. Eddie had dozens of electric guitars. The first time I saw then Eddie played a Les Paul Goldtop on one song. The rest of the songs he used two Fender Stratocaster guitars but they were clearly modified. 

You must have seen them playing back yard parties as EVH was using his guitar while still playing clubs. He used a couple of Les Pauls early on with his favorite being stolen. There are some early pics with the Les Pauls. But before they were signed and touring as Van Halen - he was using his guitar. There are early pics from a show in Texas (Texas Jam maybe?) where they didn't have their equipment and Eddie played a Les Paul. Never seen a single pic of him using a Fender Strat - not even holding one at a NAMM show or a music store somewhere.

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Posted : November 25, 2020 1:21 pm
robertdee
(@robertdee)
Extreme Peach

CanadianMule.  It was in the 1970's. We had been to Knotts Berry Farm in Southern California ( found my pictures but not the music show...just the amusement park)then saw Van Halen and another band in that area. I was down front facing the right side of the stage. I clearly remember Eddie playing a Les Paul Goldtop on one song. On the other songs he used two different guitars which looked like Fender Stratocasters to me. They had stripes and one was yellow and black stripes and the headstocks were clearly Stratocaster design. Even the whammy bar looked like a Strat. But they were modified. Didn't sound like a typical Strat.  

I just looked for pictures on Google of Eddie in mid 1970's and he is playing a Strat with red and white stripes but when I zoomed in on the headstock where the Fender logo is located on the headstock it looks rubbed out. There is a white coloration where the logo should be. The whammy and body look like a Strat too. But the pickups are modified. The bridge pickup looks like a humbucker without the cover.

Next time a saw them was in North Carolina in late 1970s and they were the headliner. Eddie played the Frankenstrat that I had read about a few weeks earlier.  I don't fully recall what was on the headstock but it was clearly the Strat design. 

The third time I saw them Eddie was playing a Strat type guitar but the headstock wasn't Strat but I think Hamer's design. Then the last time the guitar was very similar except the headstock was Kramer's design and logo. I think musicians call those Strat type guitars from Hamer, Kramer, Charvel etc superstrats as they are souped up.

I think the EHV line was made by Music Man or maybe Peavy or both at various times.

I'm trying to remember so forgive me if my guessing is a little off. 

Happy Holidays. 

This post was modified 2 months ago by robertdee
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Posted : November 25, 2020 3:47 pm
CanadianMule
(@canadianmule)
Peach Extraordianire

Blackie

 

All the guitars that you see with Stripes - are not Strats. The time line for seeing him using something other than his guitars are during club days. Some creative license being added to those memories. This crap has been all over guitar mags and the internet for years. 

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Posted : November 26, 2020 11:16 am
robertdee
(@robertdee)
Extreme Peach

Okay this is what is on line about Eddie's former number one. 

The Frankenstrat name was chosen by EVH as it denotes Dr. Frankenstein and a Fender Stratocaster.  Dr. Frankenstein used body parts from recently deceased people to create a new person. EVH wanted the classic sound and tone of a Gibson Les Paul but the physical attributes,  tremolo bar and functionality of a Fender Stratocaster.  

The guitar has northern ash Fender Stratocaster body with pickup routing modified to fit a Gibson PAF humbucking bridge pickup that Eddie removed from a ES-335. The guitar has maple Strat neck and fretboard chrome hardware and was painted black with white stripes but later painted red with black and white stripes.  Some years later the Fender tremolo was replaced with a Floyd Rose locking tremolo. The body was a factory reject that Eddie bought for 50 dollars as it had a knot in the wood. They  sold Eddied the neck for 80 dollars. The Fender tremolo came from a 1958 Strat that Eddie owned. The Gibson pickup was screwed into the bridge position slightly offset from perpendicular to compensate for the different string spacing between the Gibson pickup and the Fender bridge. Later the ES-335 pickup was replaced by a Seymour Duncan. 

Eddie removed all tone and volume controls wiring the pickups in a simple circuit. He placed a tone knob on the volume pot. Then used a vinyle record he had shaped into a pick guard. A strip of double sided masking tape was added to the body to hold spare picks. To confuse imitators Eddie installed a 3 way switch sideways into the middle position cavity intended to house a single coil pickup A Mighty Mite single coil pickup was installed in the neck cavity. Years later Eddie admitted they were not connected to anything. It was just to confuse imitators. 

The Fender logo was sanded off the headstock and the Gibson logo was added for awhile. 

Also bicycle reflectors were added to the back of the guitar so he could flip over the body and reflect the stage lights into the eyes of people in the audience. 

And lastly Eddie repainted the guitar a third time with red Schwinn bicycle paint and Eddie said that surprisingly gave the guitar even more pop. 

Eddie was worth 100 million dollars at his death. His estate declined to say how much the Frankenstrat is worth.

Anybody want to chime in? Probably at least one million? 

And what kind of guitar is it? Probably technically a Stratocaster. But I'm not sure. Canadianmule calls it Eddie's guitar and said Eddie never played a Strat.  Jimmy Herring has a Fender Stratocaster with big Gibson style pickups with Fender Stratocaster still on the headstock.  

Can Dale Earnhardt, Jr. modify a Ford to the point it is no longer a Ford but an Earnhardt?

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Posted : November 26, 2020 12:46 pm
CanadianMule
(@canadianmule)
Peach Extraordianire
Posted by: @robertdee

Okay this is what is on line about Eddie's former number one. 

The Fender logo was sanded off 

And what kind of guitar is it? Probably technically a Stratocaster. But I'm not sure. Canadianmule calls it Eddie's guitar and said Eddie never played a Strat.  Jimmy Herring has a Fender Stratocaster with big Gibson style pickups with Fender Stratocaster still on the headstock.  

Can Dale Earnhardt, Jr. modify a Ford to the point it is no longer a Ford but an Earnhardt?

Blackie

 

First off - don't believe everything you read on the internet. That is good advice.

The reason Canadianmule says that EVH didn't use a Strat is simple. He didn't use one in the club/backyard party days. He didn't use one in VH.

I have been re-reading 45 years worth of guitar magazines. Alan Paul deserves his own thread here as a side topic. I never actually realized how many of the articles that I liked over the years were written by Al. Off topic but it really blows me away. Thanks Alan.

But while taking my son for his training today, I grabbed a few mags as with Covid I can't enter the gym.

As fate would have it, one of the handful I grabbed was a Guitar World (Jan. 1987) has an article entitled Edward Builds His Ax. It is part of the Authorized Biography Of Edward Van Halen that Eddie did with Steven Rosen who EVH picked to write it.

I won't write it all out and I imagine that if you Google a better source than might get the full article story. Was also in the book so that is another source.

But Eddie goes through in detail everything he did. On the first one and on others.

But a few points. 

The body was a Linn Ellsworth body sold by his company Boogie Bodies. Body was built 75-76. There were holes for the neck and middle pickups but not the bridge pickup. EVH carved it out as he had no router. It came with the pickguard and one vol already.

Your online thing is right about the 335 pickup but it was switched out soon after as some kid reached up and pulled it out. He would end up melting pickups trying to wax them and having the wax too hot. 

The neck was also an Ellsworth that he bought from Charvel. He also used a couple of "no name" brand necks as he was learning the fretting. He then made a deal with Kramer who would make the necks and put Gibson frets on them. 

The electronics were taken from a Les Paul Jr. that he had for parts.

The guitar cost him about $150. He paid $50 for the body which was on the bottom of a pile. He paid $80 for the neck.

The only part Fender on the guitar was the tremelo system. Eddie got that from an old 62 strat that never worked properly. Later when Floyd Rose gave him a new system, EVH still used Fender tremelo for a while but did switch for live and still used the Fender whammy in the studio.

So in response - Eddie's guitar is not a Fender. In fact in the article, he talks about playing Gibson's before and didn't like the thin Strat sound. The Fender Logo was never taken off the neck as it was never a Fender.

 

Herring plays a Strat with a changed pickup. Obviously a Fender. Big difference with EVH. EVH only had a Fender Whammy bar - do we call it a Fender?

So if Dale is driving a Ford - can you call it a Dodge?

Now that all comes from EVH himself and the article is in much greater detail. Talks about all the guitars and he made a guitar with Steven with pics of him doing it.

Blackie

Didn't mean to get your back up - I just know that you never saw him play a Strat - no one outside some when they were teens at a party maybe and even then I don't think so. It is ok to not remember every guitar that you have seen played in 60 years. Wiki/Google are fun and I know that you like to go read it and then come write about it. Which is cool and some enjoy. But not everything is true that is out there. When you search Google Images for EVH with a Strat - I was shocked that I couldn't find a single one. Not even just holding one - there must be some out there but he didn't play them. He was a double coil high gain monster.

 

I couldn't believe it when I flipped the page and the article was there. Yngwie Malmsteen is on the cover. I call him Wiggly Hamstrings as he is an asshole. Read a latter installment of Canadianmule Almost Beat Rude Swede. 40 years of "rock stars" - dealt with many amazing human beings, lots of egotistical morons, wasted drunken,drugged out near corpses but I only ever almost beat two of them. Wiggly Hamstrings and Billy Idol - Idol seemed OK until I saw him absolutely make a disabled kid cry, insult/embarrass his entire family making a huge scene about not saying hello and taking pics with the kid. This was back stage and had been organized. Poor kid in a wheelchair all decked out in Billy Idol merch to the max. He screams and yells "I am not talking to some f'n retarded kid". Right in front of the kid and his family. I nearly killed him and I had nothing to do with it. His guitarist Steve Stevens told him what an assh*le he was. The next night Stevens and Idol had a fist fight and Stevens left the band for years after it.

 

Can we call it right if it is wrong, Blackie?

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Posted : November 27, 2020 1:00 am
robertdee
(@robertdee)
Extreme Peach

Thanks for all the info. Actually I Googled "Eddie Van Halen mid 1970's" not Eddie Van Halen with a Strat and if you zoom in on the headstock it is the Stratocaster distinctive design and the logo looks rubbed out. 

I discovered Charvel headstocks for their superstrats are the Strat design. Back when guitar companies were taking other guitar makers to court, the judged ruled the headstocks can't be exactly copied but bodies have more leeway.  So how can Charvel get away with the Strat design on their headstocks? Fender ownes Charvel. 

Apparently Eddie was endeavoring to build his version of a Strat thus the name "Frankenstrat".

It seems Eddie spent $150.00 to. $200.00 on parts for his Frankenstrat and now the value of that guitar is probably $1 million.

Hope you, your son and family have a great holiday season this year dispite the virus and the severe economic challenges that come with it.

I'm lucky in away. I get a nice Social Security check,  a retirement check and have a 401K. So my economic situation hasnt changed. But on the negative side I wake up every morning with a 74 year old body complete with bad knees and other aches and pains. Plus I always wear a mask out, try to stay away from others and wash my hands many times a day. My doctor said at my age Covid 19 could kill me.

It's damn irritating to be in the supermarket or Walmart or McDonald's and see a few without masks even now. Everybody has to know what is going on so I guess it's some political statement they are making and a dangerous one. And these places of business all have signs declaring "Masks and social distancing required". 

Loneliness so far is my challenge from Covid.  

But the net, old movies and music is a big help. Someone mentioned Alice's Restaurant.  I watched it again yesterday. 

Again Happy Holidays to all ABB fans and members of this site and to people who don't like the ABB. I love those people too! But I don't love people who don't like ice cream. They have to be dangerous:)

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Posted : November 27, 2020 6:44 am
Chain
(@chain)
Peach Extraordianire

Recently a poster at VHlinks.com posted a home video clip of EVH jamming backstage at a show it would seem he attended..It appears to be early 90’s.  Anyway, Ed is playing a Fender Stratocaster!   

It was posted on 9/25 and is titled “Rare video of Ed jamming.” I just watched it again but can’t seem to cut and paste the link.  Anyway, it’s pretty cool as he’s intrigued by his Jeff Beck style whammy bar bending up stuff he’s playing along with the guys he’s playing with...

https://www.vhlinks.com/vbforums/threads/65906-Rare-video-of-Eddie-jamming!?highlight=playing+strat

This post was modified 2 months ago 2 times by Chain
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Posted : November 27, 2020 7:40 am
jszfunk
(@jszfunk)
World Class Peach

I always thought or assumed all of Ed's guitar with the "strat" style body's, before Kramer, where actually Fender Strats that were heavily moded. Did not know for sure.

I always liked the one with Circles and his rasta. I think Dweezil has it now.

See the source image

See the source imageSee the source image

 

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Topic starter Posted : November 27, 2020 8:00 am
CanadianMule
(@canadianmule)
Peach Extraordianire

Cool video - Chain. Thanks

See how rare that is and EVH is laughing as if he never played one. Making his "Beck" noises.

 

He also never called it a Frankenstrat - others did. He was just a guy slapping parts together. Cheaper the better. 

You never hear about all the ones he made that were crap. LOL

He gave a buddy one of his Peavey model Wolfgang guitars. Beautiful. Not my thing but it plays like a dream.

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Posted : November 27, 2020 1:19 pm
Chain
(@chain)
Peach Extraordianire

@canadianmule

 

You’re welcome, Canadian.....I enjoyed it too.  It’s neat watching his expressions as he bends up to get those Beckish notes...I also thought it was cool that he kept mentioning how good they all sounded together.  

And you can’t go wrong jamming out, in my opinion, one of VH’s greatest songs...There’s something about the song “Mean Street.”  I’ve loved it since I first heard it and it never gets tired. 

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Posted : November 27, 2020 4:31 pm
robertdee
(@robertdee)
Extreme Peach

I have never figured out how the famous guys get such a big, loud and powerful sound out of single coil pickups.

Maybe that stack of Marshall amps I see behind him?

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Posted : November 28, 2020 6:12 am
Zambi
(@zambi)
Extreme Peach

I couldn't remember where this thread was on history of EVH guitars.  I saw it before Thanksgiving and then "lost it".  But in the interim, CanadaMule nailed it.  Before the Kramer endorsement deal around 1983 or so, EVH got a bunch of stock from Boogie Bodies which i think later merged into Charvel.  Bodies and necks. Up until the mid or late 1980s, a lot of knock-off Strats and Les Pauls copied the headstocks.  That's why EVH's striped guitars pre-Kramer days looked like Fender Strats.  But they were Boogie Bodies/Charvel.

 

When EVH parted ways with Peavey in 2004, he took his EVH Gear brand to Fender.  Fender had acquired Charvel, so that's why all the retro-striped EVH Gear that began showing up on the 2004 Hagar reunion tour is now "allowed" to have the Strat headstock shape even though it is marketed as EVH Gear and not as Fender.

 

Going off memory, EVH left Kramer in the mid-to-late 1980s but continued playing his main Kramer "5150" guitar through the OU812 tour in 1988-89.  The Ernie Ball/Music Man deal started around 1990 and lasted until 1995-96.  Those were the 'nicest' guitars of his various signature series, but production volume was low and couldn't be increased from such a small shop, so he left during the Balace tour for Peavey where they were already making the original 5150 amps.  If you see clips of the Balance tour, he was playing his main "5150" Music Man, but in the music videos and on late night TV he played the newly-introduced Peavey Wolfgangs. There are various rumors why EVH left Peavey, but they went their separate ways in 2003-04 time frame and that's when EVH created the "EVH Gear" brand and expanded beyond guitars and amps into effects pedals and other merch.  But he took the Wolfgang guitars and 5150-series amps over to Fender Musical Instruments for production and marketing around 2003-04 and that's where it remains today.

 

Also, EVH did play a Fender Strat on the OU812 arena tour in 1989.  It was a sunburst Strat with single coils, 2 knobs (master tone) and perhaps a fixed tailpiece.  He played it on Finish What Ya Started for the thin country-ish sound.  Not sure if he also played it on the Monsters of Rock tour that preceded the much smaller OU812 arena tour. Fender offered a 2-knob Strat (that was otherwise traditional Strat) for a couple years in the 1970s or possibly early 1980s, similar to the Fender Bullet line at the time.

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Posted : November 28, 2020 4:21 pm
Zambi
(@zambi)
Extreme Peach

Here is another fun EVH doing some 'out' Hendrix cover.  No video, but fun audio:

A">

 

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Posted : November 28, 2020 4:26 pm
Zambi
(@zambi)
Extreme Peach

Re: sunburst Strat:

around the 53 minute mark here: 

might have a Fender wiggle-stick on it after all, beginning around 45:15 here:

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Posted : November 28, 2020 5:38 pm
jszfunk
(@jszfunk)
World Class Peach
image
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Topic starter Posted : November 28, 2020 10:26 pm
jszfunk
(@jszfunk)
World Class Peach

https://www.evhgear.com/tribute/bumblebee

image

During the process of recording 1979 album Van Halen II, Eddie Van Halen sought something fresh to play other than his original "Frankenstrat," which at the time was being heavily copied by just about every major guitar company in the world.

Eddie had the idea to build a new guitar with an ash body and black-and-yellow-stripe paint job, with rear-loaded electronics so there would be no pickguard. He tasked Wayne Charvel to make the original guitar, which had a maple neck, maple fingerboard and dot inlays. Other features on the first-incarnation guitar (as pictured on Van Halen II) were a standard nut, single Mighty Mite® humbucking pickup with transparent bobbins, single chrome volume knob, original Charvel® six-screw brass tremolo bridge, and Schaller® tuning keys.

While pleased with the looks of the guitar, Eddie was less impressed with its tone and quickly began tinkering with it, as he was prone to do. He installed a new Boogie Bodies maple neck with a natural headstock, unfinished back (which he has always preferred) and 12"-radius dot-inlay maple fingerboard.

Next to go was the Mighty Mite pickup. After selecting a DiMarzio® Super Distortion humbucking pickup, he swapped out its ceramic magnet for an alnico 2 magnet from a Gibson® PAF. He rewound the pickup by hand, dipped it in paraffin wax and put copper tape around the windings.

Eddie also stripped out the original Charvel bridge, leaving its six screw holes behind. He instead outfitted the instrument with a prototype two-point Floyd Rose® bridge and locking nut with retainer bar, becoming the first professional rock guitarist to use a locking-nut tremolo system. He also swapped out the chrome volume knob with a Strat-style skirted "Tone" knob. After all these modifications, only the original body, striped paint job, screw-eye strap hooks and Schaller® tuners remained from the first version of the guitar.

"Bumblebee," as it would come to be known by fans, debuted on the cover of the 1979 album Van Halen II and was heavily played by Eddie throughout the 1979 world tour.

Although Eddie continued to wrestle with the overall capabilities of the guitar, the black-with-yellow-stripes theme became insanely popular. Bumblebee remains a longtime favorite for Van Halen listeners everywhere.

In an eternal sign of deep respect, Eddie's original Bumblebee guitar was buried alongside Pantera guitarist "Dimebag" Darrell Abbott, who died tragically in 2004. Eddie was Dime's main influence and Bumblebee was Dime's all-time favorite guitar. 40 years later, EVH has meticulously recreated this wildly iconic guitar in the form of the limited edition '79 Bumblebee.

 

he ’79 Bumblebee tribute model features all of the original specs, including an ash Strat® body, bolt-on birdseye maple neck with oiled back finish, straight 12” radius birdseye maple fingerboard with 21 jumbo frets, katalox dots and black side dots, and skirted Strat-style “Tone” volume knob.

True to Van Halen’s pickup recipe, the instrument has been outfitted with an EVH ’79 Bumblebee humbucking bridge pickup. EVH also matched the Bumblebee’s six screw holes, (hidden under the original prototype non-fine tuner locking tremolo bridge that EVH recreated just for this project), along with the original prototype locking nut. All hardware has been reliced, including the custom brass string retainer, screw-eye strap hooks, side output jack and original period-correct Schaller® tuning machines.

Its black-with-yellow-stripes paint job has also been reliced to match the wear and tear from his heavy year of touring in 1979, and the guitar is stylishly finished off with chrome hardware.

Notably, the back of the headstock of each guitar bears Eddie Van Halen’s signature, adding to the value and the once-in-a lifetime collector’s nature of this instrument.

Arriving in a custom-made Anvil® hardshell case, the package also includes '70s-era Fender® Super Bullets strings, Van Halen '70s tortoiseshell picks, an exclusive Bumblebee collector’s booklet, Young Guitar book Van Halen Live Tour in Japan 1978 & 1979, and several autographed items—a certificate of authenticity, 8”x10” 1979 concert photo of Eddie Van Halen and vinyl copy of Van Halen II.

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Topic starter Posted : November 29, 2020 1:00 am
robertdee
(@robertdee)
Extreme Peach

It's fun to listen to famous guitar players explaining why they modify their guitars and  how. And why they use different guitars and quit using certain guitars. They seem to actually never completely satisfied and constantly looking for some setup that may be better. 

But as the above video of Gary Moore Iinked shows, one can get big tone out of a stock Stratocaster with single coil pickups IF you have powerful amps and the right pedals. Alan Paul may correct me but I seem to remember Gary Moore saying he was a Les Paul man but when he wanted to use a whammy bar he liked a Stratocaster. 

I think Leo invented the Stratocaster for western swing and country music and remember reading he was shocked by what Jimi Hendrix was doing with powerful amps and such unorthodox use of the whammy bar. 

 

This post was modified 2 months ago by robertdee
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Posted : November 29, 2020 9:59 am
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