Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread ><<  1    2    3    4  >>Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: ...

Sublime Peach





Posts: 7168
(7166 all sites)
Registered: 4/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 05:03 PM
.

[Edited on 8/6/2008 by jerryphilbob]

 
Replies:

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19483
(19497 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 05:33 PM
No more than associating with somebody like Pastor John Hagee and his relentless anti-catholic bigotry, or Pat Robertson basically saying the same thing about America bringing 9/11 and Katrina on itself, or honoring a place like Bob Jones University while it was racist, or hearing Billy Graham's anti-semitic words while talking to President Nixon in the White House.

quote:
The following statement was released by the Barack Obama campaign Friday in response to criticism over sermons delivered by his pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr.:

On My Faith and My Church

The pastor of my church, Rev. Jeremiah Wright, who recently preached his last sermon and is in the process of retiring, has touched off a firestorm over the last few days. He’s drawn attention as the result of some inflammatory and appalling remarks he made about our country, our politics, and my political opponents.

Let me say at the outset that I vehemently disagree and strongly condemn the statements that have been the subject of this controversy. I categorically denounce any statement that disparages our great country or serves to divide us from our allies. I also believe that words that degrade individuals have no place in our public dialogue, whether it’s on the campaign stump or in the pulpit. In sum, I reject outright the statements by Rev. Wright that are at issue.

Because these particular statements by Rev. Wright are so contrary to my own life and beliefs, a number of people have legitimately raised questions about the nature of my relationship with Rev. Wright and my membership in the church. Let me therefore provide some context.

As I have written about in my books, I first joined Trinity United Church of Christ nearly twenty years ago. I knew Rev. Wright as someone who served this nation with honor as a United States Marine, as a respected biblical scholar, and as someone who taught or lectured at seminaries across the country, from Union Theological Seminary to the University of Chicago. He also led a diverse congregation that was and still is a pillar of the South Side and the entire city of Chicago. It’s a congregation that does not merely preach social justice but acts it out each day, through ministries ranging from housing the homeless to reaching out to those with HIV/AIDS.

Most importantly, Rev. Wright preached the gospel of Jesus, a gospel on which I base my life. In other words, he has never been my political advisor; he’s been my pastor. And the sermons I heard him preach always related to our obligation to love God and one another, to work on behalf of the poor, and to seek justice at every turn.

The statements that Rev. Wright made that are the cause of this controversy were not statements I personally heard him preach while I sat in the pews of Trinity or heard him utter in private conversation. When these statements first came to my attention, it was at the beginning of my presidential campaign. I made it clear at the time that I strongly condemned his comments. But because Rev. Wright was on the verge of retirement, and because of my strong links to the Trinity faith community, where I married my wife and where my daughters were baptized, I did not think it appropriate to leave the church.

Let me repeat what I’ve said earlier. All of the statements that have been the subject of controversy are ones that I vehemently condemn. They in no way reflect my attitudes and directly contradict my profound love for this country.

With Rev. Wright’s retirement and the ascension of my new pastor, Rev. Otis Moss, III, Michelle and I look forward to continuing a relationship with a church that has done so much good. And while Rev. Wright’s statements have pained and angered me, I believe that Americans will judge me not on the basis of what someone else said, but on the basis of who I am and what I believe in; on my values, judgment and experience to be President of the United States.


 

____________________

 

Sublime Peach



Karma:
Posts: 7168
(7166 all sites)
Registered: 4/7/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 05:58 PM
SPIN SPIN SPIN....OBAMA should have left this church YEARS ago. Not just denounce his beliefes. Why did he stay in this church? Was he hard of hearing. I don't have to listen to much of the crap to know I wouldn't want any part of this church.
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 17361
(17416 all sites)
Registered: 9/9/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 06:39 PM
Clinton and Obama talked briefly on the senate floor Thursday about recent statements by their respective supporters.

“They approached one another and spoke about how supporters for both campaigns have said things they reject,” said Phil Singer, a spokesman for the Clinton campaign. “They agreed that the contrasts between their respective records, qualifications and issues should be what drives this campaign, and nothing else.”


That makes plenty of sense to me.

 

____________________
Ask not for whom the bell tolls

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 69448
(69809 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 06:47 PM
quote:
SPIN SPIN SPIN....OBAMA should have left this church YEARS ago. Not just denounce his beliefes. Why did he stay in this church? Was he hard of hearing. I don't have to listen to much of the crap to know I wouldn't want any part of this church.



Maybe you should read it again. He explained it. Third paragraph from the bottom.

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20735
(20820 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 07:12 PM
quote:
Again, Obama shows he does not have good judgement and there is no way I will vote for this guy for President.

Why do I have the feeling you weren't voting for him anyway?

We have a lot of religious people on this site, so I don't know why people have trouble with the idea that a man can disagree with his church or his pastor. Do all of you agree with all the views of your respective churches? Apparently this is what's going on in politics now: nobody wants to hear what the candidates' ideas are, they just want to pore over everything ever said by anyone connected to them, then hold the candidates responsible for things they didn't say themselves. What a waste of time.

All this makes me feel lucky. I'm a Pope and there's nobody to speak for me.

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 29948
(30044 all sites)
Registered: 1/26/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 09:24 PM
but wott about the "pope on a rope" story?

 

____________________
People Can you Feel It?

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 9082
(9082 all sites)
Registered: 2/25/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 09:37 PM
Any rational person would have walked out of that church after hearing that nonsense. All the rest of political b.s. Oy vey, and you thought the last 8 years were bad.
 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1140
(1140 all sites)
Registered: 7/23/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 10:45 PM
Could spmeone explain how the words of Rev. Wright are different from the words of Fohn Hagee. I mean other than John McCain actively seeking Hagee's endorsement while knowing Hagee's positions. Both of these preachers seem guilty of the same level of intolerance to me.
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 69448
(69809 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 10:57 PM
quote:
Any rational person would have walked out of that church after hearing that nonsense. All the rest of political b.s. Oy vey, and you thought the last 8 years were bad.


Again, if you read the article, none of this was said at church services....


and yes, I thought the last 8 years were bad........

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 16027
(16019 all sites)
Registered: 10/13/2007
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:01 PM

Listen to this man speak. Then ask yourself why there is still so much hatred among the "oppressed and downtrodden." Unbelievable. No wonder Obama's wife looks down her nose at the USA. His sermons seemed to have affected her.

This post has nothing to do with his relationship with Barack..He's a big boy. But, I know that this church should lose it's tax-exempt status now. They are not allowed to back political candidates and stay tax free..

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 69448
(69809 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:19 PM
By Alex Johnson
Reporter
MSNBC
updated 8:09 p.m. CT, Fri., March. 14, 2008

Sen. Barack Obama, D-Ill., condemned racially charged sermons by his former pastor Friday and urged Americans not to reject his presidential campaign because of “guilt by association.”

Obama’s campaign announced that the minister, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright Jr., had left its spiritual advisory committee after videotapes of his sermons again ignited fierce debate in news accounts and political blogs.

Obama did not clarify whether Wright volunteered to leave his African American Religious Leadership Committee, a loose group of supporters associated with the campaign, or whether the campaign asked him to leave

“I think there was recognition that he’s obviously on the verge of retirement, [that] he’s taking a sabbatatical and that it was important for him to step out of the spotlight in this situation,” Obama said.

Wright was the latest in a series of advisers to Obama and Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton, D-N.Y., who have stepped aside as supporters of both candidates trade racially charged accusations.

Obama rejects comments
Obama spoke warmly of Wright, who retired last month as pastor of Trinity United Church of Christ in Chicago. Wright is a man “I’ve known for 17 years, [who] helped bring me to Jesus, helped bring me to church,” he said.

“I strongly condemn” Wright’s statements, but “I would not repudiate the man,” Obama said. “He’s been preaching for 30 years. He’s a man who was a former Marine, a biblical scholar, someone who’s spoken at theological schools all over the country.

“That’s the man I know,” Obama said. “That’s the man who was the pastor of this church.”

But Obama acknowledged that “there’s no doubt this is going to be used as political fodder, as it has been in the past.”

“What I hope is [that] what the American people will trust is what I believe,” he said, that “my values, my ideas, what I’ve spoke about in terms of bringing the country together will override a guilt by association.”

But the sermons, at least one of which was delivered long before Wright retired last month, revived uncomfortable questions about Obama’s ties to the minister, whom conservative critics have accused of advocating black separatism.

A videotape of one sermon captures Wright using a harsh racial epithet to argue that Clinton could not understand the struggles of African Americans.

“Barack knows what it means, living in a country and a culture that is controlled by rich white people,” Wright said on Christmas Day of last year. “Hillary can never know that. Hillary ain’t never been called a [N-word]!”

In another sermon, delivered five days after the 9/11 attacks, Wright seems to imply that the United States had brought the terrorist violence on itself.

“We bombed Hiroshima, we bombed Nagasaki, and we nuked far more than the thousands in New York, and we never batted an eye,” Wright says. “We have supported state terrorism against the Palestinians and black South Africans, and now we are indignant because the stuff we have done overseas is brought right back in our own front yards.”

In a later sermon, Wright revisits the theme, declaring: “No, no, no, not God bless America — God damn America!”

Obama: I didn’t hear inflammatory sermons
Obama took the title of his 2006 autobiography, “The Audacity of Hope,” from a sermon by Wright, who baptized him and officiated at his wedding. He has called Wright “a sounding board for me to make sure that I am speaking as truthfully about what I believe as possible.”

In his remarks on MSNBC, Obama expanded on a brief posting that was made under his name earlier Friday afternoon on the Huffington Post Web site.

“The statements that Rev. Wright made that are the cause of this controversy were not statements I personally heard him preach while I sat in the pews of Trinity or heard him utter in private conversation,” the posting said, adding that over the years, “Rev. Wright preached the gospel of Jesus, a gospel on which I base my life.

“In other words, he has never been my political advisor; he’s been my pastor. And the sermons I heard him preach always related to our obligation to love God and one another, to work on behalf of the poor, and to seek justice at every turn.”

Obama wrote that he had known of similar statements by Wright over the years, which he strongly condemned. He wrote that he chose to remain in the church because “Rev. Wright was on the verge of retirement, and because of my strong links to the Trinity faith community.”


 

____________________

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6166
(6170 all sites)
Registered: 6/10/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:28 PM
quote:
quote:
Any rational person would have walked out of that church after hearing that nonsense. All the rest of political b.s. Oy vey, and you thought the last 8 years were bad.


Again, if you read the article, none of this was said at church services....




'cuse me while I nitpick...........

"In a sermon on the Sunday after the terrorist attacks on Sept. 11, 2001, Wright suggested the United States brought on the attacks."

"In a 2003 sermon, he said blacks should condemn the United States."

"He also gave a sermon in December comparing Obama to Jesus, promoting his candidacy..."

....I guess I'm confused about your statement, because where I come from if the Pastor is sermonizing it's usually during church services..........maybe it's just my wacky denomination.....



 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 69448
(69809 all sites)
Registered: 11/28/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:31 PM
Sorry. None were said at a sermon Obama was present at, according to Obama. Good clarification.

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20556
(20616 all sites)
Registered: 2/9/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:37 PM
"Pastor Wright wrong for Obama & Country"

Did anyone force Senator Obama to attend this Church?

Wasn't his choice to listen to this .... Pastor?

Think about that

 

____________________


 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6166
(6170 all sites)
Registered: 6/10/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:42 PM
quote:
Sorry. None were said at a sermon Obama was present at, according to Obama. Good clarification.


How convenient.... ......If you believe that I got some Superdelegates to sell ya.

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20556
(20616 all sites)
Registered: 2/9/2006
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:49 PM
MSNBC... Just showed a series of Clips of this "Pastor" speaking that go back to 2000. This is not new....What took Obama so long?

 

____________________


 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6166
(6170 all sites)
Registered: 6/10/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/14/2008 at 11:55 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
Sorry. None were said at a sermon Obama was present at, according to Obama. Good clarification.


How convenient.... ......If you believe that I got some Superdelegates to sell ya.


The man works in Washington, so I believe him to a point. But answer my question about McCain.


It's is no more than Moral Relevantism. Does McCain listen to Hagee every Sunday for 20 years? Did McCain get Hagee to baptise his children? Marry him? Listen to his tapes in college?........It's like saying McCain agrees with Bob Jones because he spent 30 minutes at Bob Jones University to get votes. It doesn't jib with seeking out someone, spending 20 years under their tutelage, writing a book inspired by that person.....but, if you don't grasp it, you don't grasp it.

Who you gonna vote for in November?.....Hillary or McCain?

 

____________________

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6166
(6170 all sites)
Registered: 6/10/2005
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2008 at 12:31 AM
quote:
McCain accepted Hagee's support. Obama rejected Wright's. Can't you wrap your mind around that?


I haven't decided who I will vote for among the three remaining candidates.


Uh, .... Obama didn't reject Wright's support, just like he didn't reject Farrakhan's support. He just tried to exculpate himself from Wright's remarks. I can wrap my mind around that.

Nice try, though...

I haven't decided either.....after this 'revelation', I'm not so sure Obama's the 'messiah' people claim him to be....heard Jessie Ventura's gonna run....

 

____________________

 

Universal Peach



Karma:
Posts: 6009
(6064 all sites)
Registered: 1/19/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2008 at 09:06 AM
Appears that Obama has "officially" cut the Rev. Wright from his campaign. Have to admit it's a "smart move" as many of Rev Wright's remarks are "racially imflamatory".

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2008/03/14/AR200803140 4218.html?hpid=topnews

 
E-Mail User

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1140
(1140 all sites)
Registered: 7/23/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2008 at 09:34 AM
For clarification....John McCain has actively sought the endorsement of Hagee. Doesn't matter if he attended Hagee's church or not, he has pursued the endorsement. That's an absolute reversal of position for McCain, who once called these hatemongers "agents of intolerance". Now, if you're a Democrat that's called "flip-flopping" and is casuse for immediate dismissal of all ideas and positions. So, I guess that means if John McCain is elected all Catholics will be rounded up and detained. Hagee calls the Catholic church "the great whore" and "a bastard religion". So, based on this thread, John McCain hates Catholics. Now, can we move on and discuss McCains illegitimate black child he fathered while married to another woman. It has to be true because W's folks said so back in 2000. Got it in an e-mail, so there's your verification.
And while we're at it, we should revoke the tax exempt status of a lot of Southern Baptist churches who preached from the pulpit in 2004 that W was "God's chosen candidate". Strangely, not one SBC church has been prosecuted for that. Wonder why.

 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4772
(4786 all sites)
Registered: 12/5/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2008 at 12:17 PM
One of the panelists on CNN Anderson Cooper I forget his name brought up the point that this type of preaching style is actually more prevalent in some black churches than people realize and it's kind of an old school thing where they mix politics with their social plight into their sermons that many preachers use this style and it has carried forward going back as far as Frederick Douglass.

Since I'm not African American and haven't had to deal with any of the injustices that African Americans have had to deal with, I'm struggling with the concept of how I can judge Wright on this preaching style and message since I can't put myself in an African Americans shoes and see it fully from an African Americans perspective. Knowing my personality I would most likely be just as angry. By all accounts the guy has done some very inspiring positive work also.

I also see how this preaching style is very scary.

I do think Obama handled the questions from Anderson Cooper pretty well. And I strongly doubt he himself subscribes to the views and posesses the mindset of Wright.



[Edited on 3/15/2008 by Peachypetewi]

 

____________________
"Capitalism is the extraordinary belief that the nastiest of men for the nastiest of motives will somehow work for the benefit of all". John Maynard Keynes

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 29948
(30044 all sites)
Registered: 1/26/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2008 at 12:32 PM
quote:
For clarification....John McCain has actively sought the endorsement of Hagee. Doesn't matter if he attended Hagee's church or not, he has pursued the endorsement. That's an absolute reversal of position for McCain, who once called these hatemongers "agents of intolerance". Now, if you're a Democrat that's called "flip-flopping" and is casuse for immediate dismissal of all ideas and positions. So, I guess that means if John McCain is elected all Catholics will be rounded up and detained. Hagee calls the Catholic church "the great whore" and "a bastard religion". So, based on this thread, John McCain hates Catholics. Now, can we move on and discuss McCains illegitimate black child he fathered while married to another woman. It has to be true because W's folks said so back in 2000. Got it in an e-mail, so there's your verification.
And while we're at it, we should revoke the tax exempt status of a lot of Southern Baptist churches who preached from the pulpit in 2004 that W was "God's chosen candidate". Strangely, not one SBC church has been prosecuted for that. Wonder why.



I can't stand Hagee and the other hate mongers. I caught a Hagee broadcaast channel surfing and all he talked about was
the "millions of muslims all wanting to kill us" He paints Islam as evil, He is every bit as wrong as
islamic extremists . Preachers of hate and fear should be avoided and ignored.

But McCain is trying to unite the republicans for the election, and to get Karl Rove's constituency he
has to swim with some snakes.


 

____________________
People Can you Feel It?

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19483
(19497 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2008 at 01:13 PM
quote:
One of the panelists on CNN Anderson Cooper I forget his name brought up the point that this type of preaching style is actually more prevalent in some black churches than people realize and it's kind of an old school thing where they mix politics with their social plight into their sermons that many preachers use this style and it has carried forward going back as far as Frederick Douglass.




Wow, folks do need to get out more. It is times like this when I am reminded that there are not nearly enough Black folks and otherwise on this site. More inter-action needs to happen. A good way to start is to listen to Urban Talk Radio. Here is a good place to start, listenig to Lincoln ware weekdays 10am to 2pm eastern at www.1230thebuzz.com. There is nothing new about any of this.

As for Reverend Wright, it is a generational thing. Wright is stuck in the Malcolm X mindset before Malcolm's enlightenment that happened torwards the end of his life. The book, "The Autobiography of Malcom X," should be a must read for all peoples, especially if read all of the way to the end. What Obama should have said regarding Farakhan was to go farther than to just rebuke him. The first thing he should have done was to bring Malcolm X into the conversation and point out his life and transformation near the end of his life after his trip to Egypt and Mecca. The US government, no doubt, wanted Malcolm quieted and suppressed, to put it mildly. But, ultimately it was the Nation of Islam, from which Malcolm broke after discovering the lameness of the teachings, Yacub etc, and the unseemingly behavior of Elijah Muhammad, that had Malcolm murdered, and Farakhan was right there in the leadership when they had him taken out. Farakhan has even talked, especially in a speech in 1993, about Malcolm being a cancer in the Nation and they had to remocve it. He has not atoned for this neary enough, and I won't forget it, and that should be the focus of Obama's comments. Yes, despite how wack it is, the Nation of Islam does do some good. When I talk to a young Nation brother and buy a copy of the Final Call newspaper that he is selling along a street in a suit and tie, they have always been polite and courteous and they are in a better way than being a murdering thug. But, Farakhan is ridiculous.

When I think of Rev. Wright's trip to Africa with Farakhan to hobnob with Qaddafi, the first thing I think of is why did he ignore modern day slavery happening right now in the Sudan, in Mauritania, in northern Africa and the servitude still going on in the arab nations??? If you are going to give speeches about how bad America was in the old days, why ignore people of color being enslaved right this f*cking second??

At the same time, I do understand the holdover of the speeches where the bad of America is brought forth. No, I do not believe, as Rev. Wright and others assert, that America invented aids to kill Africans. Yet, that mindset comes out of real American history where things like that happened. One obvious example, Black men were unknowlingly injected with syphilis in the Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment and left untreated for 40 years so they could be studied. They never knew that they were injected with syphilis by our American government. Folks, this 'experiment' not only really happened, but lasted all of the way up until 1972- well within my lifetime. http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/health/may97/tuskegee_5-16.html. Nothing is impossible.

On the other hand, with each new generation, change and improvement does happen. A Black man is a true contender for the office of the president of the United States. But, here we are with subtle race baiting being thrown out there, by Democrats of all people, and leaders like Rev. Wright veering off into what I call race hustling and poverty pimping. Racism still exists, without a doubt. But, you can make it in America if you believe you can and work to make it happen. Both Obama and his wife went to Ivory League schools. I didn't. When I hear Rev. Wright's speeches, it doesn't deal with Black kids in the neighborhoods not showing yup for school on any given day. 'Because of racism back in the day, I'm not going to school this week.' Bullsh*t. 'Education is a white thing. Educated brothers are sellouts.' Bullsh*t. ' 'Black kids can't properly learn that 2 plus 2 equals 4 because it isn't taught in an Afrocentric way.' Bullsh*t.

America's ills should never be ignored or swept under the rug, and America's history, good and bad, should never be forgotten. But, you have to take advantage of the progress that has been made, and Rev. Wright blaming America for 9/11 is ridiculous. From these speeches, it is almost as if Wright doesn't want Obama to succeed. Why?? Because leaders like that want Folk to keep coming to them, to keep giving them money, to not be aware that you can make it in America. Look at the flak that Bill Cosby gets for telling like it is, 'airing dirty laundry,' and all of that sh*t, yet all folks have to do is look at the Black murder rate in Philly to know what is up. Other communities are trying to deal with it, and the murder rate drop here in Cincinnati is one example. That only happens when you admit that things are f*cked up. It is time to get passed this, to never forget the past, but to move forward and let these new generations move the bar even further in a positive way.

And as I said before, Mccain didn't repute Hagee's endorsement, or Rod Parsley's lame ass. In a sense, I agree with Obama in this way- I have had older family members, most dead now, who never got past the 'N' word and negative views about Black folks, etc. You could talk to them until you were blue in the face, but they wouldn't budge. All other aspects of their life were fine, I loved them and they were good people in every other way but that subject, and you didn't kick them to the curb even though you disagreed with them vehemently. The same with Obama and Wright- let the older generation die out, and let the newer generations work to get it right.

DH



[Edited on 3/15/2008 by DerekFromCincinnati]

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20735
(20820 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 3/15/2008 at 10:55 PM
Yeah- to give credit where it's due, I agree with almost all of that post also.

 

____________________

 
<<  1    2    3    4  >>  


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software

Privacy | Terms of Service | Report Infringement | Personal Data Management | Contact Us
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com