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Author: Subject: Trump

Zen Peach



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  posted on 7/11/2016 at 10:16 PM
quote:
Why Do We Hear More About Hillary’s Emails Than Donald Trump’s Rape Charges?



When is the sentencing phase set to begin?

Typically there is a sentencing phase after a trial that results in a guilty verdict.


Since he's been charged when does the trial start?



Besides you, who here has said he's been charged?


It's right there in the Huffington Post headline, posted about six times on this page of the
thread. I guess you didn't see it.




[Edited on 7/11/2016 by alloak41]


I guess you can't read.

This is the headline:


Why Do We Hear More About Hillary’s Emails Than Donald Trump’s Rape Allegations?



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/why-do-we-hear-more-about-hillarys-emai ls-than-donald_us_577979e2e4b0746f564846b4



do you know the difference between being charged and allegations?


Why don't you try reading things and learning rather than making things up.


They changed the headline. Mystery solved. Jeez, talk about missing the point.


Well, thank you for not changing the headline in the article you posted. I know you wouldn't
do something like that. Can't say the same for everybody, though...

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/11/2016 at 10:27 PM
quote:
quote:
Why Do We Hear More About Hillary’s Emails Than Donald Trump’s Rape Charges?



When is the sentencing phase set to begin?

Typically there is a sentencing phase after a trial that results in a guilty verdict.


Since he's been charged when does the trial start?



Besides you, who here has said he's been charged?


It's right there in the Huffington Post headline, posted about six times on this page of the
thread. I guess you didn't see it.




[Edited on 7/11/2016 by alloak41]


I guess you can't read.

This is the headline:


Why Do We Hear More About Hillary’s Emails Than Donald Trump’s Rape Allegations?



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/why-do-we-hear-more-about-hillarys-emai ls-than-donald_us_577979e2e4b0746f564846b4



do you know the difference between being charged and allegations?


Why don't you try reading things and learning rather than making things up.


They changed the headline. Mystery solved. Jeez, talk about missing the point.


Well, thank you for not changing the headline in the article you posted. I know you wouldn't
do something like that. Can't say the same for everybody, though...


Says the moron who only quotes part of what people post to change the context to suit his own purposes.

 

True Peach



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  posted on 7/11/2016 at 10:32 PM
quote:
quote:
Why Do We Hear More About Hillary’s Emails Than Donald Trump’s Rape Charges?



When is the sentencing phase set to begin?

Typically there is a sentencing phase after a trial that results in a guilty verdict.


Since he's been charged when does the trial start?



Besides you, who here has said he's been charged?


It's right there in the Huffington Post headline, posted about six times on this page of the
thread. I guess you didn't see it.




[Edited on 7/11/2016 by alloak41]


I guess you can't read.

This is the headline:


Why Do We Hear More About Hillary’s Emails Than Donald Trump’s Rape Allegations?



http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/why-do-we-hear-more-about-hillarys-emai ls-than-donald_us_577979e2e4b0746f564846b4



do you know the difference between being charged and allegations?


Why don't you try reading things and learning rather than making things up.


They changed the headline. Mystery solved. Jeez, talk about missing the point.


Well, thank you for not changing the headline in the article you posted. I know you wouldn't
do something like that. Can't say the same for everybody, though...

You mean like the way Trump keeps saying stuff then denying he ever said it?

17 times Donald Trump said one thing and then denied it:
http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2016/jul/06/17-things-donal d-trump-said-and-then-denied-saying/

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 7/11/2016 at 11:13 PM
quote:
They changed the headline. Mystery solved. Jeez, talk about missing the point.


Well, thank you for not changing the headline in the article you posted. I know you wouldn't
do something like that. Can't say the same for everybody, though...

You mean like the way Trump keeps saying stuff then denying he ever said it?

17 times Donald Trump said one thing and then denied it:
http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2016/jul/06/17-things-donal d-trump-said-and-then-denied-saying/



Well, ________________ does the same thing. Right?

 

True Peach



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  posted on 7/12/2016 at 07:15 AM
quote:
quote:
They changed the headline. Mystery solved. Jeez, talk about missing the point.


Well, thank you for not changing the headline in the article you posted. I know you wouldn't
do something like that. Can't say the same for everybody, though...

You mean like the way Trump keeps saying stuff then denying he ever said it?

17 times Donald Trump said one thing and then denied it:
http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/article/2016/jul/06/17-things-donal d-trump-said-and-then-denied-saying/



Well, ________________ does the same thing. Right?

If you say so.

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 7/13/2016 at 12:39 PM
In an interview with CNN, a former Trump University instructor admits that his main job wasn't to teach real estate, it was to sell real estate seminars. http://cnn.it/29ChF9R

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 7/14/2016 at 07:02 AM
Dueling Claims on Crime Trend

President Barack Obama said there have been “huge drops in the murder rates” in cities like New York, Los Angeles and Dallas. Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump said “violent crime has increased in cities across America.” Which is it? We’ll score this one for Obama.

The long-term trend is a decline, not only in the murder rates per population, but the total number of murders in the cities Obama mentioned, and nationwide. The same goes for violent crime. Trump was referring to a recent year-over-year increase in murders in some cities.

For example, the number of murders in Dallas peaked at 500 in 1991, but dropped to nearly half that (231) in 2000, according to data from the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Statistics, which is based on voluntary reporting by local police departments. By 2012, the number had dropped further, to 154. That’s not adjusted for population — it’s the sheer numbers of murders and nonnegligent manslaughter reported.

So, the number of murders in Dallas went from 500 in 1991 to 154 in 2012, a decrease of 70 percent. The murder rate, offenses per 100,000 in population, dropped from 48.6 to 12.4 in that same time frame, a 74 percent decrease.

But Trump pointed to a New York Times story on an uptick in 2015 in the number of murders in several cities, including Dallas, as compared with 2014. The Times report showed a 17 percent increase in murders (an increase of 12 murders) in Dallas for January through August 2015 compared with the same time period for 2014.

Indeed, the Dallas Morning News later reported that the total for all of 2015 was a 17 percent increase over the previous year, but noted 2014’s number of murders (116) had been a “historic low” and the murder rate for 2015, according to city officials, was “the city’s fourth-lowest since Dallas police started counting in 1930.”

As criminology and statistics experts told us, we can’t discern a trend from a few years of data.

Both politicians made their claims days after the July 7 shooting in Dallas, in which five law enforcement officers were killed by a sniper who told police he was targeting white officers. This came after police in Minnesota and Louisiana had shot and killed two black men earlier that week.

In a July 9 press conference in Poland after a NATO summit, Obama said:

Obama, July 9: Now, when it comes to crime, generally, I think it’s just important to keep in mind that our crime rate today is substantially lower than it was five years ago, 10 years ago, 20 years ago, 30 years ago. Over the last four or five years, during the course of my presidency, violent crime in the United States is the lowest it’s been since probably the 1960s, maybe before the early 1960s. There’s been an incredible drop in violent crime.

So that doesn’t lessen, I think, people’s understandable fears if they see a video clip of somebody getting killed. But it is important to keep in perspective that in places like New York, or Los Angeles, or Dallas, you’ve seen huge drops in the murder rates. And that’s a testimony to smarter policing, and there are a range of other factors that have contributed to that.


Violent crime has declined over the last five, 10, 20, 30 years, as Obama said, but he went too far in claiming that it’s “the lowest it’s been since probably the 1960s.”

As this graph of violent crime rates for the nation shows, the rate is lower than it has been since 1970. And the rate has been on a steady decline since it peaked at 758.2 in 1991. It was less than half that, 365.5 in 2014. But it was lower in the 1960s than it has been in recent years. (The FBI describes its data as “estimated,” and as we mentioned it comes from voluntary reports from local law enforcement agencies.)



The murder and nonnegligent manslaughter rate nationwide, at 4.5 in 2014, was at its lowest point since at least the early 1960s, when the rate dipped as low as 4.6. (Note the numbers do not include lives lost in the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.):



Trump made his claim in a July 11 speech in Virginia Beach:

Trump, July 11: We must discuss, as well, the ongoing catastrophe of crime in our inner cities. Our inner cities are rife with crime. According to the Chicago Tribune, there has already been more than 2,000, 2,000 shooting victims in Chicago alone this year. This epidemic of violence destroys lives, destroys communities, and destroys opportunity for young Americans. Violent crime has increased in cities across America. The New York Times described “the startling rise in murders,” in our major cities.

Full article: http://www.factcheck.org/2016/07/dueling-claims-on-crime-trend/

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 7/14/2016 at 11:49 AM
You reckon there may be an inverse relationship between gun ownership/the proliferation
of guns in our country and violent crime?

Hmmm

 

True Peach



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  posted on 7/14/2016 at 03:06 PM
quote:
You reckon there may be an inverse relationship between gun ownership/the proliferation of guns in our country and violent crime?

I don't know about that, but the data certainly shows there is a direct correlation between the number of times Trump's lips move and the occurrence of falsehoods.

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 07:24 AM
Know your candidate...

Trump’s Greatest Hits
A compendium of the top false and misleading claims by the Republican presidential candidate
By Lori Robertson
Posted on July 18, 2016

In advance of the Republican National Convention, which begins July 18 in Cleveland, we present a wrap-up of some of the more egregious falsehoods from Donald Trump, who is set to accept his party’s nomination for president later this week.

We focused on claims most relevant for the general election and those that Trump has repeated, or that could likely be repeated by him or others this week. For more on each statement, follow the links to our full stories. And all of our articles on Trump can be found here.

We’ll post an article on claims by Hillary Clinton, the presumptive Democratic nominee, next week in advance of the Democratic convention in Philadelphia.

Claims About Clinton

Trump repeatedly has claimed in stump speeches and interviews that Hillary Clinton is going to “raise your taxes very substantially.” But almost all of the tax increases she has proposed would apply to the top 10 percent of taxpayers, according to analyses by the nonpartisan Tax Policy Center and pro-business Tax Foundation. “[T]he bottom 95 percent of taxpayers would see little or no change in their taxes,” the TPC said.

“Trump on Clinton’s Tax Plans,” June 28

Trump told a group of evangelical Christian leaders that there’s “nothing out there” about Clinton’s religion. That’s false. Her religious practice as a Methodist has been well-documented in news reports, by Clinton herself and even in a book. “In fact, we know enough about Hillary’s faith that I was able to write a 334-page book titled God and Hillary Clinton way back in 2007,” author Paul Kengor, executive director of the Center for Vision & Values at the conservative Grove City College, told us in an email.

“We Know Plenty About Clinton’s Religion,” June 22

Trump falsely claimed that U.S. Ambassador to Libya Chris Stevens “was left helpless to die as Hillary Clinton soundly slept in her bed.” In an NBC interview, Trump later acknowledged he had no evidence to support his claim, saying, “who knows if she was sleeping … she might have been sleeping.” Two emails from Clinton show that she was awake after she knew of Stevens’ death from the 2012 attack in Benghazi.

He also wrongly said Clinton would “end virtually all immigration enforcement and thus create totally open borders for the United States.” She supported the 2013 Senate immigration bill that would have created a path to citizenship for those in the country illegally, but also would have invested in border security. Clinton’s campaign website says she would “focus enforcement resources on detaining and deporting those individuals who pose a violent threat to public safety.”

“Trump’s Attack on Clinton’s Character,” June 22

Trump distorted Clinton’s gun control plan, claiming she “wants to take your guns away” and “abolish the Second Amendment.” She proposes restrictions, including a ban on semi-automatic “assault weapons,” but doesn’t call for a ban on all guns. Clinton also calls for expanded background checks. She has talked repeatedly about the need to respect the “constitutional rights of responsible gun owners.”

“Trump Distorts Clinton’s Gun Stance,” May 10

Trump claimed that “Hillary Clinton received a classified intelligence report stating that the Obama administration was actively supporting Al Qaeda in Iraq, the terrorist group that became the Islamic State.” Michael Morell, the deputy director and acting director of the CIA from 2010 to 2013, who also served under the Bush administration, called Trump’s claim “an old conspiracy theory … that has no place in our public discourse.”

“Trump’s ISIS Conspiracy Theory,” June 16

Foreign Policy and Trade

Trump has repeatedly claimed that he opposed the Iraq War before it began on March 19, 2003, but there’s no evidence of that. In a February debate, Trump claimed, “I said it loud and clear, ‘You’ll destabilize the Middle East,'” and in a September 2015 debate he said he could provide “25 different stories” to prove his opposition. More recently, in June, Trump told CNN, “I think there is evidence. I will see if I can get it.” But his campaign has yet to produce one such example, and we couldn’t find any. In fact, Trump in September 2002 told radio shock jock Howard Stern, “Yeah, I guess so,” when asked if he supported going to war with Iraq. It wasn’t until a few months after the war began that Trump expressed concern about the war and, at that time, it was about the cost of the war, not the stability of the region.

“Donald Trump and the Iraq War,” Feb. 19

In a June interview on CNN, Trump wrongly claimed that Iran is “taking over the oil” in Iraq. Experts told us Iran doesn’t control any Iraqi oil fields. “Iraq’s oil is still the property of the people of Iraq,” said Jim Krane, a fellow at the Center for Energy Studies at Rice University and an expert in geopolitical aspects of energy. In fact, Iraq produced and exported a record amount of crude oil last year.

“Trump Wrong on Iraqi Oil,” June 7

In a late April speech on foreign policy, Trump claimed that “now ISIS is making millions and millions of dollars a week selling Libya oil.” Claudia Gazzini, a senior analyst for Libya with the International Crisis Group, told us there’s no evidence of that. Gazzini said that the Islamic State’s strategy thus far has largely been to disrupt oil operations in Libya rather than to try and make a profit off of them. (Syria is a different story: In December, the State Department estimated ISIS was making $500 million a year on oil from fields it controlled in Syria.)

“Trump’s Foreign Policy Speech,” April 28

Early in his campaign, Trump got two facts wrong about birthright citizenship — a provision of the 14th Amendment that grants citizenship to babies born in the United States even if their parent or parents are living illegally in the country. Trump claimed Mexico doesn’t have a policy like that, but indeed it does. “Mexico currently has a system that is nearly identical to that of the United States,” Emilio Kourí, director of the Katz Center for Mexican Studies at the University of Chicago, told us. “What we call birthright citizenship, their constitution calls nationality.”

Trump also said “birthright citizenship” is the “biggest magnet for illegal immigration.” Actually, research shows the biggest magnet is economic opportunity, or jobs. Estimates on the number of immigrants in the U.S. illegally also reflect the economy, with the number rising or falling along with shifting economic conditions.

“Trump on Birthright Citizenship,” Aug. 25, 2015

“Trump’s Immigration Plan,” Aug. 20, 2015

Trump said he “got to know” Russian President Vladimir Putin “very well because we were both on ’60 Minutes,’ we were stablemates, and we did very well that night.” Both men were interviewed for the Sept. 27, 2015, episode, but separately, in different countries — Putin in Moscow and Trump in his Manhattan penthouse. Trump also has claimed repeatedly that Putin had called him a “genius.” Russian language experts told us in May that Putin used a word meaning “colorful” or “bright,” depending on the translation. Putin clarified in June that he called Trump “flamboyant.”

“Trump vs. Fiorina: Who Knows Putin Best?” Nov. 11, 2015

“Putin Did Not Call Trump a ‘Genius'” May 6

On trade, Trump has continuously exaggerated the U.S. trade deficit with China, saying it’s $505 billion. It’s not — the trade deficit with China was $367 billion for 2015. Trump’s figure is close to the $532 billion net trade deficit with all countries. He also has repeatedly, and falsely, said that the U.S. has a negative trade balance with every country with which it does business. The U.S. has positive trade balances with Brazil, Netherlands, Belgium, Singapore, Australia and Argentina, among others.

“FactChecking the 11th GOP Debate,” March 4

Trump has called the North American Free Trade Agreement “Bill Clinton’s disastrous and totally disastrous NAFTA” and said that Clinton “signed it” and it was “his baby.” Actually, the agreement was negotiated and signed by President George H.W. Bush. President Clinton later signed the bill enabling NAFTA in 1993, but it took Republican congressional support to get the legislation to his desk.

“Trump’s Attack on Clinton’s Character,” June 22

“Groundhog Friday,” July 1

Trump also claimed that NAFTA “literally emptied our states of our manufacturing and our jobs,” but economic studies say NAFTA’s net impact on U.S. jobs has been small. A 2015 report from the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service, for instance, called the net impact “relatively modest,” noting that it was difficult to gauge the overall impact due to other economic factors.

“Trump’s Foreign Policy Speech,” April 28

Refugees

Trump has made several false claims about Syrian refugees. Nearly 5 million Syrians have been displaced by the civil war that began in March 2011, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees. The Obama administration plans to accept up to 10,000 this fiscal year, which ends Sept. 30.

Trump suggested in a radio interview in November that the federal government sends Syrian refugees to states with Republican governors, saying, “They send them to the Republicans, not to the Democrats, you know, because they know the problems.” But the government doesn’t place refugees — nongovernmental agencies, such as the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, do, basing the decision on family ties or employment. “The idea that there’s some sort of conspiracy here [to relocate based on the politics of a state], that’s just not the case,” Matthew Soerens, a spokesman for World Relief, an evangelical organization that also resettles the refugees, told us. The stats didn’t back-up Trump, either: We found on average, states with Republican governors had just over 41 Syrian refugees each, and states with Democratic governors had just over 36.

“Facts about the Syrian Refugees,” Nov. 23, 2015

Trump has said that Syrian refugees are entering the U.S. with “no documentation” and “no paperwork.” Some may lack paperwork, but the head of the refugee affairs division of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services told Congress that “in general they have many, many documents.” The State Department says the process to admit a refugee to the U.S. takes 18 to 24 months on average.

“Donald Trump on Orlando Shooting,” June 14

In a January debate, he also said the Syrian refugees were mostly “strong, powerful men,” but at the time, most registered with the United Nations were female (50.7 percent) and males under the age of 12 (20 percent). That breakdown largely holds: Figures as of July 4 say women are 49.7 percent and males under 12 are 20.2 percent.

“FactChecking the Sixth Republican Debate,” Jan. 15

Muslims

It may be his best-known falsehood: In a Nov. 21 speech in Alabama, Trump claimed that he saw on TV “thousands and thousands” of people in New Jersey cheering the fall of the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001. A day later, he again said he saw this and emphasized that in New Jersey, “you have large Arab populations.” But there’s no evidence of such a widespread celebration, or related TV footage. In fact, news organizations in New Jersey and New York tried to track down rumors of celebrations at the time and came up empty. Trump then doubled down on the claim, demanding an apology and citing as support a Washington Post story about an alleged celebration that was unattributed and unverified, and not televised.

“Trump, Carson on 9/11 ‘Celebrations,'” Nov. 24, 2015

In March, Trump wrongly claimed that a Pew Research Center survey found that “27 percent, could be 35 percent” of the world’s Muslims “would go to war” against the U.S. The Pew Research Center told us it had conducted no survey that asks such a question, and experts we consulted didn’t know of any such survey, either.

“Trump’s False Muslim Claim,” March 16

Pew Research Center surveys prove another Trump claim wrong: He said that assimilation among Muslim immigrants in the U.S. is “pretty close” to “nonexistent.” But Pew concluded in 2011 — based on detailed phone interviews with more than 1,000 U.S. Muslims — that “Muslim Americans appear to be highly assimilated.”

“Trump’s Baseless Assimilation Claim,” June 17

After the mass shooting at an Orlando nightclub in June, Trump said “many people” thought the shooter, Omar Mateen, “was a whack job,” but they didn’t report him. Not true. Mateen’s co-workers in 2013 reported that he boasted of having terrorist ties, and the FBI opened a 10-month investigation. Also, a week after Trump made his claim, a Muslim friend of Mateen stepped forward to say he had reported Mateen to the FBI in 2014.

There’s also no evidence for Trump’s claim about Muslims being complicit in the Dec. 2, 2015, shooting in San Bernardino, California. He said that “many people,” including neighbors of the shooters, saw “bombs all over the floor” of the couple’s apartment, but declined to report it because of concerns about racial profiling. One friend of a neighbor said the neighbor noticed a lot of packages arriving at the house, and that the couple had been doing a lot of work in their garage — and the neighbor didn’t report it due to racial profiling concerns.

“Donald Trump on Orlando Shooting,” June 14

Domestic Policy

Trump claimed that his tax plan, unveiled Sept. 28, is “revenue neutral,” but tax experts say that’s not the case — not by a long shot. Even when the pro-business Tax Foundation assumed the tax cuts in the plan would promote economic growth, it estimated that federal revenues would be reduced by more than $10 trillion over 10 years.

“Is Trump’s Tax Plan Revenue Neutral?” Oct. 1, 2015

Trump said he “heard” the unemployment rate was really 42 percent. It’s nowhere close to that. The unemployment rate was 4.9 percent when Trump made the claim in February, and it still is today. Trump’s figure would include retirees, teenagers, stay-at-home parents and anyone else who doesn’t need or want to work. If Trump wanted to include part-time workers wanting full-time work and those who have given up looking for a job but had searched for one in the past year, he could use 9.9 percent for the unemployed and underemployed rate.

“Trump Wildly Inflates Unemployment,” Feb. 10

Trump claimed the government could save “hundreds of billions of dollars in waste” through negotiating prescription drug prices. But Medicare, which isn’t allowed to negotiate drug prices now, spent well under that — an estimated $77 billion total — on its prescription drug program in 2015. When Fox News’ Chris Wallace pointed out during a debate that Medicare’s drug spending was well under the $300 billion a year savings figure Trump had cited in the past, Trump said he was talking about “saving through negotiation throughout the economy.” But Trump had claimed several times that he could save $300 billion a year through negotiating drug prices. That would be the total amount spent on retail prescriptions, by the government, insurers and consumers in 2014.

“FactChecking the 11th GOP Debate,” March 4

In California in June, Trump suggested “there is no drought” in the state, because it has “plenty of water.” California is in its fifth year of a severe “hot” drought, so named by scientists for both the dry and high temperature conditions that are made more likely by global warming. Trump also said water was being shoved “out to sea” to “protect a certain kind of three-inch fish.” Officials primarily release water from reservoirs to prevent salt water from contaminating agricultural and urban fresh water supplies.

“Trump’s Dubious Drought Claims,” June 9

Trump was wrong when he called Common Core “education through Washington, D.C.” and said the education standards had been “taken over by the federal government.” The standards — for what children in grades K-12 should know in math and English — were developed by state officials, and curriculum is still controlled at the state and local school level. As for the federal government, federal money has been used to develop standardized tests for Common Core, and the Obama administration gave states that voluntarily adopted the standards advantages in competing for education grants. That’s far from a federal takeover.

“FactChecking the 12th GOP Debate,” March 11

In late November, Trump retweeted a bogus graphic purporting to show homicide data delineated by race. He told Fox News the graphic came from “sources that are very credible,” but nearly every number in the graphic is wrong. Among the gross inaccuracies: The graphic said 81 percent of white murder victims were killed by blacks; the real figure is 14.8 percent, according to the FBI’s Uniform Crime Reports data for 2014.

“Trump Retweets Bogus Crime Graphic,” Nov. 23

Trump on Trump

Trump claimed that he “predicted Osama bin Laden” in his 2000 book, “The America We Deserve,” saying “I said in that book that we better be careful with this guy named Osama bin Laden” and that the U.S. “better take him out.” There are no such passages in the book. The lone mention of bin Laden in the book refers to him escaping a U.S. jetfighter attack in August 1998, ordered by President Clinton in response to bombings of U.S. embassies in Kenya and Tanzania that month.

“Trump’s bin Laden ‘Prediction'” Dec. 2, 2015

Unlike many other 2016 presidential candidates, Trump has not released his tax returns and claimed “there’s nothing to learn” from them. But experts told us there’s plenty of information to glean from a candidate’s tax returns, including sources of income, effective tax rates, charitable giving habits, conflicts of interest and more. Every major party nominee since the late 1970s has released tax returns before Election Day.

“Trump’s Tax Returns,” May 12

The Better Business Bureau rating for Trump University was a “D-” in 2010, a fact the BBB confirmed in a statement. That was the last year the school accepted new students. But Trump repeatedly insisted it got an “A” rating, even posting a video to YouTube in which he holds up a sheet of paper with an “A” rating. That meaningless rating was for The Trump Entrepreneur Initiative, which was launched in 2010 when Trump University had to change its name since it wasn’t a licensed university. The BBB reviews are based on the last three years of complaints and information, so the “A” rating would have been from 2014, years after the school stopped taking new students.

“Trump University’s D- Rating,” March 8

Trump said he started his business career with only $1 million from his father. That undervalues his father’s contributions, which included “considerable financial and political clout,” Gwenda Blair, author of “The Trumps: Three Generations of Builders,” told us. Fred Trump co-guaranteed a construction loan and lent millions on another occasion, Blair said.

“FactChecking the 11th GOP Debate,” March 4

Trump claimed Ford changed its plans to build new manufacturing facilities in Mexico because of his criticism of the deal on the campaign trail, which included the threat of putting a high import tax on the company. But Ford said it hadn’t changed its plans at all. One of Trump’s tweets pointed to a story on a separate deal, credited to Ohio Gov. John Kasich and dating to 2011, to move some production from Mexico to Ohio.

“Trump’s Bogus Boast on Ford,” Oct. 26, 2015

— By Lori Robertson, with the staff of FactCheck.org

Editor’s Note: Lori Robertson will be in Cleveland covering the Republican convention for FactCheck.org from July 18 to July 21.

http://www.factcheck.org/2016/07/trumps-greatest-hits/

 

____________________
I pledge and support the elimination of the derogatory use of the r-word from everyday speech and promote the acceptance and inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities. http://www.r-word.org/

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 11:50 AM
I find it strange that the same people who go on and on about Obama and/or Hillary blaming a video for Benghazi don't have any problems at all with Trump's constant lies. Lying is nothing new to politicians, but Trump takes it to a whole new level. There has never been anything like him before. His lying is like an art and his supporters seem to ignore it all.
 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 04:40 PM
quote:
I find it strange that the same people who go on and on about Obama and/or Hillary blaming a video for Benghazi don't have any problems at all with Trump's constant lies. Lying is nothing new to politicians, but Trump takes it to a whole new level. There has never been anything like him before. His lying is like an art and his supporters seem to ignore it all.


Trump lies. Hillary lies. It's a push, and it's debatable whether Trump "takes it to a new level."
Highly debatable. He's probably fact checked more but that's another story.

 

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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 05:34 PM
quote:
quote:
I find it strange that the same people who go on and on about Obama and/or Hillary blaming a video for Benghazi don't have any problems at all with Trump's constant lies. Lying is nothing new to politicians, but Trump takes it to a whole new level. There has never been anything like him before. His lying is like an art and his supporters seem to ignore it all.


Trump lies. Hillary lies. It's a push, and it's debatable whether Trump "takes it to a new level."
Highly debatable. He's probably fact checked more but that's another story.


And you lie as well. (Cox, Strasburg). You are probably not the one to comment on this. Just sayin'.

 

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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 05:58 PM
said this evening on MSNBC......Far Out

REP. STEVE KING (R-IA): This whole white people business though does get a little tired, Charlie. I mean, I would ask you to go back through history and figure out where are these contributions that have been made by these other categories of people that you are talking about, where did any other subgroup of people contribute more to civilization?

CHRIS HAYES (HOST): Than white people?

KING: Than Western civilization itself that's rooted in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the United States of America, and every place where the footprint of Christianity settled the world. That's all of Western civilization.

 

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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 06:19 PM
LOL my friend in Australia asked me why Scott Baio and the guy from Duck Dynasty were speaking at the convention. I told her Clint Eastwood and Ted Nugent were busy.

ROFL......she just asked if the Empty Chair was busy too.

[Edited on 7/18/2016 by LeglizHemp]

 

____________________
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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 09:05 PM
quote:
said this evening on MSNBC......Far Out

REP. STEVE KING (R-IA): This whole white people business though does get a little tired, Charlie. I mean, I would ask you to go back through history and figure out where are these contributions that have been made by these other categories of people that you are talking about, where did any other subgroup of people contribute more to civilization?

CHRIS HAYES (HOST): Than white people?

KING: Than Western civilization itself that's rooted in Western Europe, Eastern Europe, and the United States of America, and every place where the footprint of Christianity settled the world. That's all of Western civilization.

Remember back in Jan and Feb when Iowa was the center of the political universe? Same place the elected this guy to the US Senate. Just sayin.

 

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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 09:08 PM
quote:
LOL my friend in Australia asked me why Scott Baio and the guy from Duck Dynasty were speaking at the convention. I told her Clint Eastwood and Ted Nugent were busy.

ROFL......she just asked if the Empty Chair was busy too.

[Edited on 7/18/2016 by LeglizHemp]

It's a fair question. At least the Dems will get a few A-listers.

 

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  posted on 7/18/2016 at 09:42 PM
Tony Schwartz, the ghost-writer for Donald Trump’s “The Art of the Deal,” tells Jane Mayer of the New Yorker (link below): “I put lipstick on a pig. I feel a deep sense of remorse that I contributed to presenting Trump in a way that brought him wider attention and made him more appealing than he is. I genuinely believe that if Trump wins and gets the nuclear codes there is an excellent possibility it will lead to the end of civilization.”

If he were writing “The Art of the Deal” today, Schwartz said, it would be a very different book with a very different title. Asked what he would call it, he answered, “The Sociopath.”

http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2016/07/25/donald-trumps-ghostwriter-tell s-all

 

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  posted on 7/19/2016 at 11:19 AM
For the third time, Donald Trump, U.S. is not 'highest taxed nation in the world'
By Louis Jacobson, Linda Qiu on Sunday, May 8th, 2016 at 5:43 p.m.

Donald Trump released a tax plan in September that would give huge tax cuts to the top 0.1 percent and bloat the deficit by at least $10 trillion over the next decade. But after he became the GOP’s last man standing and presumptive nominee, Trump said this week he’s considering raising taxes on the rich.

"Should we assume that most of your plans, then, we shouldn’t take you at your words, as sort of that they’re floors?" Meet the Press host Chuck Todd asked Trump.

"It is called life, Chuck. It’s not my word, of course. I put in a proposal. You know what they are? They're really proposals. People can say it’s a tax plan. It’s really a tax proposal. Because after I put it in, and I think you know the Senate and Congress, you know as much as anybody, they start working with you and they start fighting," Trump responded. "But I’m not under the illusion that that it’s going to pass. They’re going to come to me. They’re going to want to raise it for the rich more than anybody else."

He then explained why, despite that, he’s still sticking to his guns and giving "a massive" tax cut to businesses: "We’re the highest taxed nation in the world. Our businesses pay more taxes than any businesses in the world. That’s why companies are leaving."

This is a version of one of Trump’s oft-repeated talking points, and it’s inaccurate.

When we looked at this claim in the past, we compared the United States to the 33 other industrialized nations in Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

Data from 2014, the most recent year available, shows that the United States wasn’t the most highly taxed by the typical metrics and actually places near the bottom or around the middle of the pack.

Trump specified this time that he was talking about business taxes, but the essential data doesn’t back him there, either.

Trump would have been more accurate if he had been more specific. The United States does have one of the highest top marginal corporate tax rates in the world. However, companies pay less in practice because they can take deductions and exclusions. When we look at the actual tax burden on U.S. companies, it’s far from highest in the world.

Here’s a chart breaking it down:



The World Bank’s data for 2012 — the last year for which it has complete figures — also placed the United States near the bottom in tax revenue as a percentage of GDP. Nations with lower percentages were two OECD members (Japan and Spain), a couple of oil-rich countries (Oman and Kuwait) and few impoverished states (like Afghanistan and the Central African Republic).

We also looked at a 2016 report by the World Bank and PricewaterhouseCoopers that assessed the total tax burden for a case study company in different places around the world. The total tax rate — which includes not only income taxes but also labor taxes, property taxes, profit taxes, etc. — is expressed as a percentage over the total profit.

By this metric, the company would have a total tax rate of 43.9 percent in the United States, placing it at No. 64 out of 189 countries.

That’s lower than the rates the company would have paid in the two countries Trump says the United States loses to, China (67.8 percent) and Mexico (51.7 percent). Moreover, it’s nowhere near the top.

Our ruling

Trump said, "We're the highest taxed nation in the world."

By all metrics we looked at, the United States is far from the most taxed nation overall and for businesses.

We rate Trump’s claim False.



http://www.politifact.com/truth-o-meter/statements/2016/may/08/donald-trump /donald-trump-us-not-highest-taxed-nation-in-world/

 

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  posted on 7/20/2016 at 04:32 PM
Donald Trump said he “recommended” that the Republican National Convention be held in Ohio. But Trump announced his presidential run a year after Cleveland had been selected for the site of the convention.

http://www.factcheck.org/2016/07/trump-recommended-ohio-for-convention/

 

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  posted on 7/21/2016 at 01:20 PM
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/07/20/did-the-trump-cam paign-violate-federal-law-by-using-a-trump-organization-speechwriter/?posts hare=521469036580007&tid=ss_tw

Did the Trump campaign violate federal law by using a Trump Organization speechwriter?

By Philip Bump July 20

"My name is Meredith McIver," it began, "and I'm an in-house staff writer at the Trump Organization." McIver explains how she was working with Melania on the speech when the candidate's wife read out some passages from Michelle Obama's 2008 convention speech. Those passages were then accidentally included in the draft Trump used, for which McIver, later in the note, apologizes. Done and done; the truth has come out.

But there's another problem. Notice the letterhead of the statement: The Trump Organization, which is to say Donald Trump's personal business. And notice how McIver describes herself: As an employee of the Trump Organization, not the campaign.

If Trump used corporate resources to write a political speech, that could be illegal.

"On the face of it, this looks like a corporate violation," explained Lawrence Noble, general counsel for the Campaign Legal Center. And that is "a violation of federal law. It can result in civil penalties to the corporation and the campaign." If the campaign used corporate resources "willingly and knowingly," the offense is a criminal one.

Noble notes, however, that the campaign has regularly used corporate staff for the campaign -- but have properly accounted for that use by paying the staff from the campaign. Trump's campaign can use Trump Organization staffers if those staffers are paid for that work by the campaign.

"It's very hard to tell exactly what's going on," Noble said, "but it's possible that what they're doing is paying in advance for the use of staff." Campaign filings show that the Trump campaign has done this frequently; as long as the staff are paid for their campaign work -- by the campaign, and in advance -- it's allowed. The campaign also has to compensate the corporation for any resources used: A computer, a printer, a desk. If Trump For President anticipated using McIver and then wrote a check to Trump Org for her time and electricity and so on, that angle is covered. (The way that campaign finance reports are filed, though, it's hard to know if this is what happened, even after the fact.)

That the letter is on Trump Organization letterhead is also problem by itself. "The Trump Organization should not be providing anything to the campaign that it's not getting paid for," Noble said -- including letterhead. It also reinforces the idea that McIver wasn't working for the campaign at all, as legally required. The letter contains no suggestion that McIver was a campaign employee at any point. Noble points out that she offered to resign her position, but which position? For it to have been legal, she was working for the campaign -- but it seems clear that she offered to resign from her theoretically unrelated Trump Organization job. What we would have expected is a letter on campaign letterhead talking about how McIver as a campaign employee accidentally included parts of Obama's speech. None of that is the case.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

True Peach



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  posted on 7/21/2016 at 01:24 PM
quote:
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/07/20/did-the-tru mp-campaign-violate-federal-law-by-using-a-trump-organization-speechwriter/ ?postshare=521469036580007&tid=ss_tw

Did the Trump campaign violate federal law by using a Trump Organization speechwriter?

By Philip Bump July 20

"My name is Meredith McIver," it began, "and I'm an in-house staff writer at the Trump Organization." McIver explains how she was working with Melania on the speech when the candidate's wife read out some passages from Michelle Obama's 2008 convention speech. Those passages were then accidentally included in the draft Trump used, for which McIver, later in the note, apologizes. Done and done; the truth has come out.

But there's another problem. Notice the letterhead of the statement: The Trump Organization, which is to say Donald Trump's personal business. And notice how McIver describes herself: As an employee of the Trump Organization, not the campaign.

If Trump used corporate resources to write a political speech, that could be illegal.

"On the face of it, this looks like a corporate violation," explained Lawrence Noble, general counsel for the Campaign Legal Center. And that is "a violation of federal law. It can result in civil penalties to the corporation and the campaign." If the campaign used corporate resources "willingly and knowingly," the offense is a criminal one.

Noble notes, however, that the campaign has regularly used corporate staff for the campaign -- but have properly accounted for that use by paying the staff from the campaign. Trump's campaign can use Trump Organization staffers if those staffers are paid for that work by the campaign.

"It's very hard to tell exactly what's going on," Noble said, "but it's possible that what they're doing is paying in advance for the use of staff." Campaign filings show that the Trump campaign has done this frequently; as long as the staff are paid for their campaign work -- by the campaign, and in advance -- it's allowed. The campaign also has to compensate the corporation for any resources used: A computer, a printer, a desk. If Trump For President anticipated using McIver and then wrote a check to Trump Org for her time and electricity and so on, that angle is covered. (The way that campaign finance reports are filed, though, it's hard to know if this is what happened, even after the fact.)

That the letter is on Trump Organization letterhead is also problem by itself. "The Trump Organization should not be providing anything to the campaign that it's not getting paid for," Noble said -- including letterhead. It also reinforces the idea that McIver wasn't working for the campaign at all, as legally required. The letter contains no suggestion that McIver was a campaign employee at any point. Noble points out that she offered to resign her position, but which position? For it to have been legal, she was working for the campaign -- but it seems clear that she offered to resign from her theoretically unrelated Trump Organization job. What we would have expected is a letter on campaign letterhead talking about how McIver as a campaign employee accidentally included parts of Obama's speech. None of that is the case.


I saw Trump's campaign manager on the Today Show this morning say that he had no idea who McIver is until after the fact and that he had no idea she was involved in writing the speech, and his previous denials about plagiarizing we based on talking to the campaign speech writers. So unless he changes his story again, I'm guessing that the campaign hasn't paid her anything.

 

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  posted on 7/21/2016 at 02:48 PM
For some reason the Trump folks seem scared of any American voters that actually have a conscience...


Trump's campaign manager says Ted Cruz 'made a mistake' by not endorsing the GOP nominee

Donald Trump's campaign chairman Thursday called Sen. Ted Cruz's refusal to endorse the Republican presidential nominee a "mistake," after Cruz's speech to the party's convention tore open old wounds in what was intended to be a unifying week for the GOP.

“Cruz used very bad judgment,” top Trump aide Paul Manafort told NBC’s “Today.” “... He made a mistake. I think he was not respectful of the invitation by the convention to come and speak.”

Manafort called the Texas lawmaker’s move a failure to adhere to the responsibilities of the position he accepted as a GOP leader and speaker at the event.

Cruz, who was a Trump rival during the primary season, instead encouraged voters to come out in November and “vote your conscience," which was the rallying cry of the anti-Trump movement.

“If you love our country and if you love your children as much as I know you do, stand, and speak, and vote your conscience,” Cruz said. “Vote for candidates up and down the ticket who you trust to defend our freedom and to be faithful to the Constitution.”

Full article: http://www.latimes.com/nation/politics/trailguide/la-na-republican-conventi on-2016-trump-manafort-cruz-made-a-mistake-not-1469104746-htmlstory.html

 

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  posted on 7/21/2016 at 03:35 PM
This should not happen in the land of the free. I do believe it is evidence of the Trumping of America and it is definitely not ok...


Mohamed Ahmed Radwan Kicked Off Plane After Flight Attendant Said 'You Will Be Watched'

The easiest way to get kicked off an airplane? Be Muslim.

Mohamed Ahmed Radwan was taking an American Airlines flight from Charlotte, North Carolina, to Detroit, Michigan, in December when he was ejected from the plane.

On Wednesday, with the assistance of the Council of American Islamic Relations, Radwan filed a complaint against the airline for "discriminatory conduct" to the U.S. Department of Transportation.

The complaint, dated July 20, said a flight attendant told Radwan she will be watching him — over the public intercom system.

"As Mr. Radwan took his designated seat, a flight attendant loudly announced: "Mohamed Ahmed, Seat 25-A: I will be watching you," the complaint said. "After approximately one minute, the flight attendant again repeated the announcement, this time stating: 'Mohamed Ahmed, that is a very long name, Seat 25-A: I will be watching you.' For the third time, in a louder and more aggressive tone, she again announced, '25-A: you will be watched.'"

After respectfully inquiring about the several announcements the flight attendant made about him, Radwan was told that he was being "too sensitive" and was asked to come to the front of the plane. From there, "Camille" — a flight attendant — and a male American Airlines employee discussed the incident with Radwan.

Camille then informed Radwan that he had to be removed from the flight. The reason for his removal? The flight attendant was "uncomfortable" with him on the plane.

"It is apparent that American Airlines removed Mr. Radwan from his flight not out of legitimate and credible safety concern or need, but because of his identifiably Arabic and Muslim name," the complaint added.

This is happening all too often.

The complaint pointed out multiple instances in 2016 where flight attendants or airline companies removed passengers this year being Arab or Muslim. For example, on June 16, a bearded man was kicked off of a plane when a passenger said he looked "Arabic and scary."

After requesting another booster seat on United Airlines flight at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, a Muslim mother and her three children were removed from the plane on March 26. A few weeks later, Southwest Airlines removed a university student for speaking Arabic. And on Jan. 18, four men were ejected from an American Airlines flight because the cabin crew — including the captain — did not feel "comfortable" with their presence on the plane. Three of them were Muslim and one of them is Sikh.

When airline companies kick out passengers for speaking Arabic or "looking Muslim," they're criminalizing the Muslim identity. How many more incidents do we need to have before we do something about it?

https://mic.com/articles/149420/mohamed-ahmed-radwan-kicked-off-plane-after -flight-attendant-said-you-will-be-watched#.SNWBI9cQr

 

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  posted on 7/21/2016 at 03:40 PM
quote:
For some reason the Trump folks seem scared of any American voters that actually have a conscience...


Trump's campaign manager says Ted Cruz 'made a mistake' by not endorsing the GOP nominee

Donald Trump's campaign chairman Thursday called Sen. Ted Cruz's refusal to endorse the Republican presidential nominee a "mistake," after Cruz's speech to the party's convention tore open old wounds in what was intended to be a unifying week for the GOP.

“Cruz used very bad judgment,” top Trump aide Paul Manafort told NBC’s “Today.” “... He made a mistake. I think he was not respectful of the invitation by the convention to come and speak.”

Manafort called the Texas lawmaker’s move a failure to adhere to the responsibilities of the position he accepted as a GOP leader and speaker at the event.

Cruz, who was a Trump rival during the primary season, instead encouraged voters to come out in November and “vote your conscience," which was the rallying cry of the anti-Trump movement.

“If you love our country and if you love your children as much as I know you do, stand, and speak, and vote your conscience,” Cruz said. “Vote for candidates up and down the ticket who you trust to defend our freedom and to be faithful to the Constitution.”

Full article: http://www.latimes.com/nation/politics/trailguide/la-na-republican-conventi on-2016-trump-manafort-cruz-made-a-mistake-not-1469104746-htmlstory.html


You know, if Cruz, Romney, the Bushs, and all of the other top GOP members who refuse to back Trump actually came out in a high profile event and backed Johnson, I think he might have a chance.

 
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