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Author: Subject: 40 min Loan Me A Dime!

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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 01:12 AM
This is extracted from a 1973 ZigZag interview with Boz Scaggs.

If this is still in a can at Muscle Shoals, I want to hear it!!!


"MUSCLE SHOALS

Boz finally left The Steve Miller Band in September 1968 and played around San Francisco in places like The Stardust Lounge on the corner of Hayes and Laguna, which was a small black R & B bar, but had met his next door neighbour, Jann Wenner, who had just started up Rolling Stone magazine. Eventually their friendship turned to the possibility of making a record together, and before Boz knew where he was, he was signed to Atlantic Records, and in April 1969, they headed for Muscle Shoals, Alabama. 'That album is probably my favourite record - it exudes an unselfconscious warmth and beauty from every track and you can actually share the musician's delight in each other, and in the music that they are making, an altogether fabulous record.

ZZ: What was the attitude to Muscle Shoals when you decided to record there?

Boz: Atlantic had been sending people down to Muscle Shoals for a longtime. Aretha, Sam and Dave.

ZZ: How many studios were down there?

Boz: There's about five studios and like two main R & B studios. There was one that was built from money that Percy Sledge made from 'When A Man Loves A Woman'. That was one studio. And then there was this cat called Rick Hall, he really started it. Its three cities in the one area. They were built in the thirties during the depression by the Tennessee Valley Authority, which was a thing set up in the New Deal to give jobs to that part of the country. They build these dams and also the three towns that make up Muscle Shoals, Florence Alabama, Sheffield Alabama and Muscle Shoals Alabama, but they're basically one huge town. I mean there's about 180- 200 thousand people, but it looks like a town of five thousand people. It's really just like any small town. The reason that there was a studio there in the first place was because of gospel music. Those sleeve photos were taken at Otis Redding's ranch, not in Muscle Shoals. So were the ones of Duane, which came from the Allman's first album.

ZZ: That message, about a yesful orgy, what does that mean?

Boz: Jann wanted something to describe the event, because it's a totally magic experience. Anyone who has ever been down there goes through it. It's almost a religious experience. We just wanted to write something that would be a good memory of what it was like. We had a pretty high time. We put a lot of effort and thought into making the album, but the actual event took place just like that. It only involved ten days in all. We arrived on Friday night and we'd finished the album by the next Friday night. It was just a flash and there was the album.

ZZ: Had you written the material?

Boz: I'd written some and I had a pretty good idea what we wanted. We did two other songs that weren't on the album. It was all finalised in the studio, but I'd done a few demos of stuff.

ZZ: What made you pick the Jimmie Rodgers song 'Waiting For A Train'?

Boz: Jimmy Johnson - one of the guitarists - came up to me in the studio with this single. And he'd been a Jimmie Rodgers freak for years, a real follower of Jimmie Rodgers, and he just brought this song along. And he was so sweet. He's really modest, and he was very shy about telling me about it. He said real quiet, "I really love your songs and I love what we're doing, man," and he was really apologetic while he was saying this, and he went on, "I really think it would be a gas to do it, just like it is on the record, I think your voice is great for this song". I mean, it was all his idea to do it. And we got hold of this cat at the barber shop to play his fiddle and Duane had his dobros, and everybody got right into it.

ZZ: Now I understand that there's a bit of a story behind Duane and his dobros.

Boz: Oh year. Well, this was a little bit after the album - about four or five months. I went back to the south, to Macon, just to visit people that I'd met there, and I just told my girlfriend to pack up a few suitcases, and we'd stay for a bit. And it was just when the Allmans were getting together. Now I was playing with a few friends of mine called Mother Earth, at weekends and things. Somehow or other, I knew all the people in the band from different sources. Tracy Nelson I was real friends with. And there was this cat up there in Nashville who just travels around - and he's a really famous guy. I mean Tracy has got this most fabulous collection of steels and dobros, he's got everything, and he told me about this cat. And when I went back to Macon I told Duane about it, and he wanted to check it out, because he didn't actually own a dobro at the time. So he and his wife, and myself drive up to Nashville to get the lowdown on this guy. He was living in this little dingy apartment building, that he'd just taken temporarily and he had more dobros that you thought existed. Man, he had dobros stacked against the wall up to the ceiling; I mean, there was hardly any furniture, just dobros everywhere, and it was a really **** ty apartment, covered in dobros. Every sort that you could imagine - inlaid, pearl inlaid, gold inlays, gold plated. His hobby was just dobros, it was also his livelihood. He also had all these snakes, and there was like boa constrictors and rattlesnakes crawling all over the place, and this big dirty aquarium tank full of snakes, and he fed them live mice. A very weird cat. He was a Harvard graduate who'd gone off a bit. Anyway Duane tried them all, and he found this perfect one, just what he'd always wanted. It was more money than he could afford, but it was too good to miss, so he took it.

ZZ: You had to put him in the toilet during 'Loan Me A Dime' didn't you?

Boz: That track was one of the only tracks where we had all the musicians in the studio at the same time, where they were all blowing away. We had five horn players, and the whole rhythm section and Duane's style - the way he gets his sound - is to wind up that energy level, and he sounds really loud. Now the other cats use tiny little Fender amps, that's just the way they play. And they freaked when old Duane cranked his guitar up, so we had to move him into the other room otherwise he would have filled up the whole room and his stuff would have leaked onto all the other tracks. So we put Duane's amplifier in the bathroom, no actually we put Duane himself into the toilet which was only about as big as this table - 3 by 3. And he was crammed in there with his headset and amp, and just wailed away. And man he played... wheeeeew.

ZZ: Was the other guitarist on 'Loan Me A Dime' you?

Boz: No, Duane.

ZZ: It sounds like there's a bit of lick trading going on there.

Boz: That was Eddie Hinton and Duane.

ZZ: I remember when you were over here a couple of years ago you told me that the track was a jam, and that it was a very rare thing to hear those Muscle Shoals cats to that.

Boz: We came to the end of the number and they knew that they were going to do it. The drummer, Roger Hawkins, said "Lets break into a slow boogaloo, and play out the chords and just have a jam," and we were going to let it just fade out, like just a sniff of what we were doing. And they broke into a little boogaloo, and the little boogaloo broke into a slow shuffle and the slow shuffle turned into a swinging shuffle and they just went right on. And Duane started soloing, and Barry Beckett started soloing and they just took it from there. Rarely do they come back in to listen to the playbacks, I mean those guys have been in the studio for years and they don't have to go back into the room to listen, they know what they've played. But they came in to hear what they'd played. And while they were listening to it they were looking at each other and going, "God, man" and grinning at each other. The first time we did it it lasted 25 minutes, and everyone thought it was such a gas that they trouped back in and did it again and it ended up with about 40 minutes of "Loan Me A Dime" and we wanted to use at least 20 minutes of it, but we had to use the shorter version, but that music is in the can somewhere in Muscle Shoals, and Duane was really rockin' out.

ZZ: He was a fantastic musician because among other things he would fill out a number, rather than dominate it.

Boz: Oh absolutely. Any great musician’s strength is his ability to play with other musicians, to support them. That's, number one, and it's a quality that's there in all great music. And number two; he grew up a lot in Muscle Shoals as a session man, at The Rick Hall (also known as Fame) Studios, playing with other session musicians, and that's the way they play, very clean and very laid back. They're in the studio every day for hours and hours, they have this tremendous amount of experience, and Duane had that. When you play in a studio you have to change your style to fit in, you have to be very versatile, and every note has got to be played perfectly and that's how he could play so well.

ZZ: Were you aware that you'd made such amazing music?

Boz: We didn't know what we'd get really, because we'd put a lot of elements in and at the end we weren't too sure what we had, but we liked it. It all happened so fast. Bang! We had the album in our hands. It didn't get too much promotion and most of the people who got it were friends, and they liked it, so that pleased us, that gave it a real kick.

ZZ: Has anyone ever recorded, say 'I'll Be Long Gone', because, by my standards it's a beautiful song.

Boz: That particular song was recorded by Cissy Drinker. I was going through the south checking out all the studios in MS, The Sweet Inspirations were there doing an album, and Cissy Drinker was there and I played it for her in another studio, and Tom Dowd was producing them, and they liked it and did it, so they were really the first to do it, but it was never on an album, because they didn't use it.

ZZ: What about some of your other songs?

Boz: Well that's really down to the music publisher. You submit a lot of material - demos, and lead sheets and they send them around to specific producers and artists - well that's the way it should be done, but I've never done that. It's not a deliberate thing. I've never had time to do it, to keep my eye on the publishing side of things. Writing songs is how I earn a living, but that part of it I can't see as a business per se, you know, pushing tunes. Other people have done my songs, but not because there was someone pushing them - Tracy Nelson did 'I'll Be Long Gone', and a new group called Blood has just done it. And also a black gospel group in Detroit, called The Vance Allan Group have done it.

ZZ: What was their version like?

Boz: It was really funny, funny as hell. They're basically a gospel group, and I think they should be popular over here soon. But he takes these songs that he hears - really obscure material, and he changes the words around and gives them a Christian message. That's what he did with 'I'll Be Long Gone', he changed it to give it a religious meaning. And it said written by Vance Allan, but we straightened it out very easily. But I've really lost out on that side. When I left, Mary Travis wanted to do 'I'll Be Long Gone' and 'We Were Always Sweethearts' and I was to send lead sheets, but somehow I just didn't get it together.

ZZ: What was Jann Wenner's role on that album?

Boz: Well he just helped me to get the whole thing together. I'm a great procrastinator. Jann just has a way of pushing, you know. "Do you have a song ready for me I'd like to hear it" and I'll say "Sort of, but I don't have all the words yet, there's one chorus that still needs to be done," and he'll go, "Well sit down and here's some paper and a pen, just sit down and do it, write it down, and when you've done that we'll get some musicians together and go into the studio, and make a demo, and have a listen to it." Or he'll come in and say "We've got to listen to them all tonight. We're going to use Muscle Shoals, and we're going to listen to them all, and pick the guys we like - and we're going to do it tonight," and somehow we do it. He's a producer in the sense that he's like a film producer, he takes all the elements and makes all the arrangements.

ZZ: Is the M.S.S. Horns credited on the 'My Time' sleeve the same as the guys on the early album?

Boz: No, one of them is. Ben Cauley on trumpet was the head of the section that we used for 'My Time'.

ZZ: What about the two girls that we don't know about? Jeannie Greene is on Elektra now. Donna Thatcher is in the Dead. What about Sue Pilkington and Mary Holliday?

Boz: Mary Holliday is around Muscle Shoals. She lives in Memphis, and she plays around there. Sue Pilkington wasn't actually on the record - that's the only existing photograph of all the other chicks, and she happens to be in it.

ZZ: And the other guys?

Boz: Well Eddie Hinton, besides being an amazing guitar player is a fantastic songwriter and singer. He made an album which Atlantic didn't release, last year, and it's great. He's half Paul McCartney and half Burt Bacharach, and he sings like Joe Cocker and Ray Charles. He went to Nashville to do it and he's in Nashville now. The rest of the cats are still there. They still live there and come over for the Traffic gigs."

http://www.bozscaggs.info/82129/html/page.html






 
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Peach Master



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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 06:47 AM
I'd LOVE to hear these two jams!

Thanks for posting the interview.

 

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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 09:23 AM
Great post thx...Would love to hear those jams..they must be somewhere!
 
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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 09:28 AM
We saw the ABB play a smokin version on 8-25-00 at the Madsion Blues Fest


Aug 25, 2000 (Fri)
The Allman Brothers Band
Madison Blues Festival
Madison, Wisconsin
1.Trouble No More
2.Black Hearted Woman
3.Stand Back
4.Jessica
5.Franklin's Tower
6.What's Done Is Done
7.Midnight Rider
8.Don't Want You No More
9.It's Not My Cross To Bear
10.Mountain Jam
11.Loan Me A Dime
12.Feel So Bad
13.Dreams
14.Les Brers In A Minor
15.Revival
Encore:
16.One Way Out

Delbert McClinton opened
Jimmy Herring subbed for Dickey

 

True Peach



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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 10:54 AM
Thanks for posting this. I'd love to hear that too.
 

True Peach



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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 11:22 AM
Great read!

The article reinforces (or alludes to) the fact that the entire music/recording industry just dropped the ball on Eddie Hinton. Obviously, everybody - every PLAYER who ever worked or recorded with him got him. Eddie probably didn't make great life or career decisions, but I think the industry just ignored him to some degree. I've read so many articles where producers thought he was going to be the next big thing. Disco, substance abuse and record companies just failing to understand what they had on their hands contributed to his obscurity.

 

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Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 11:57 AM
Thanks for sharing this article.

 

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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 02:42 PM
Many, many years ago dj Michael Tearson on Phillys WMMR played Loan Me a Dime and commented afterward that the song kept going and going but on the record they just fade out after 12 minutes or so. I called him later to ask for more info but he acted like he never said that. The 70s, go figure...

I always wondered if that tape existed and how great it would be to hear it. Nothing like Duane burnin' it up.

Steve


 

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  posted on 6/25/2014 at 11:37 PM
quote:
Great read!

The article reinforces (or alludes to) the fact that the entire music/recording industry just dropped the ball on Eddie Hinton. Obviously, everybody - every PLAYER who ever worked or recorded with him got him. Eddie probably didn't make great life or career decisions, but I think the industry just ignored him to some degree. I've read so many articles where producers thought he was going to be the next big thing. Disco, substance abuse and record companies just failing to understand what they had on their hands contributed to his obscurity.


Agree X 2. Here is a clip from a documentary about Eddie. It was never released in the US, only the UK. His mother had rights his estate and objected to the fact that it alluded to drug use and mental illness. Poor Eddie couldn't even catch a break after death in his home country. Warning, there are three video on this site for some reason all three start to play at once. the film is called Dangerous Highway and is the second clip.

http://marabiproductions.com/marabiproductions.com/Doc_Clips.html

 

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A Peach Supreme



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  posted on 3/28/2015 at 09:28 AM
Edsel have just released a 2 CD set of the original 1969 mix and the 1977 remix of Boz Scaggs.

Couldn't they have included the full Loan Me A Dime (or was 40 mins an exaggeration of Butch Trucks proportions?!)?

Unfortunately, they have mislabelled them so 1969 is actually the 1977 and vice-versa!

£8.99 from Amazon UK if your hearing is still good enough to tell the difference!





[Edited on 3/28/2015 by Shavian]

 

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  posted on 3/29/2015 at 01:56 PM
Rusty I agree with you about Eddie Hinton. I remember buying his Capricorn album and being completely go smacked. Patterson Hood has been doing the work of the angels keepng Eddie's music alive. It was such a rush hearing them do Everybody Needs Lcve on TV during the GoGo Boots tour. If you haven't seen the vids you should check it out

 

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  posted on 3/29/2015 at 02:20 PM
quote:
Great read!

The article reinforces (or alludes to) the fact that the entire music/recording industry just dropped the ball on Eddie Hinton. Obviously, everybody - every PLAYER who ever worked or recorded with him got him. Eddie probably didn't make great life or career decisions, but I think the industry just ignored him to some degree. I've read so many articles where producers thought he was going to be the next big thing. Disco, substance abuse and record companies just failing to understand what they had on their hands contributed to his obscurity.


Great artist. Too bad many more didn't hear of him. Below is a link that you should enjoy. The tune was also covered on the Capricorn Rhythm Section CD cut a few years back (Alive at 2nd Street Music Hall). That too was a great compilation of music from some our favorite musicians.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t8DNzfJMaYk

 

A Peach Supreme



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  posted on 4/4/2015 at 11:50 AM
quote:
Edsel have just released a 2 CD set of the original 1969 mix and the 1977 remix of Boz Scaggs.





According to the Jann Wnner interview in the booklet accompanying this, there was two versions of LMAD - the 12/ 13 minute one on the record and a shorter, tighter one!!!

So much for 25 and 40 min versions mentioned in Scaggs' 1973 Rolling Stone interview!

Wenner also says that he played LMAD over the phone to Jerry Wexler whose reaction was to call back an hour later to say, "Get those guys out of there, they're spending too much money"!!!






 
 


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