Thread: What is Prog Rock to you all?

canuckABBfan - 2/2/2020 at 10:41 AM

With the recent passing of Neil Peart I've been re-discovering what bands are Prog to me... I know the term is vast and wide.

Here are some bands I'd call prog..... I'll list my ten to start things off:

1) Pink Floyd
2) Emerson. Lake & Palmer
3) Rush
4) Yes
5) King Crimson
6) Jethro Tull
7) Genesis - Peter Gabriel era
8) Atomic Rooster
9) Alan Parsons Project
10) Asia


Stephen - 2/2/2020 at 04:07 PM

Good topic, your list just about nails it - the Mahavishnu Orchestra, the 2 LP Focus III album - also the one-off Intergalactic Touring Band, from 1977 - even albums (CDs) like Col Bruce & ARU, Frogwings, people like Al Dimeola kind of sound like it to my ears

Side I of Tarkus is my all time fave - it’s a whole ‘concept’


BrerRabbit - 2/2/2020 at 06:35 PM

OP got the leading lights. Endless genre.

Gentle Giant

Nektar

Todd Rundgren

Steve Hillage


Weird weird early proto prog deep cut, not one guitar in the group:

"Copper Sunset" by Aardvark, from early Canterbury Scene where a lot of proggers spawned.

The Jon Lord sonic signature will leap out at you - So striking that I dug deep into the webs to learn who first did this B3 overdrive. Deep Purple was from that same Canterbury scene but they werent doing this yet - the organ on "Hush" sounds like a guy doing kung fu on a Wurlitzer - nothing like this overdriven infernal growling beast sound - early Pink Floyd pretty much straight organ . . . this sound first hit on "Machine Head" that was 1972, this is from 1970.

I think Lord caught this group at a club, or picked up this record before it immediately tanked, and reverse engineered this sound:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oB51dig1a0Q







[Edited on 2/2/2020 by BrerRabbit]


crazyjoe - 2/2/2020 at 07:02 PM

Great question! To me Prog Rock would mean hearing my dad listening to early Genesis, King Crimson, ELP, Zappa, etc. and realizing it was kinda cool but, just not my thing, it meant staying up late to catch some of these acts on late night rock tv, it meant digging that cool ELP album cover?...............Peace...........joe


Sang - 2/2/2020 at 07:22 PM

I have been listening to a lot lately - Porcupine Tree, Steven Wilson solo, and Riverside. Also Steven Hackett solo stuff. Don't really remember Atomic Rooster, but I sure listened to all the others on your list. Steven Wilson has remastered most of King Crimson, Tull, and Yes to surround sound, so I have been buying all of those. He also did some of the XTC and Gentle Giant albums. The surround sound adds so much - especially Tull and Yes.....


JimSheridan - 2/2/2020 at 09:07 PM

I love prog. Some prog is proggier than others! I also think at times there is a fine line or an overlap between prog and fusion.

So, Mahavishnu Orchestra: prog or fusion? Zappa: prog or fusion?

The answer doesn't change my enjoyment, but I think there are interesting discussions around the terms.


canuckABBfan - 2/2/2020 at 11:26 PM

quote:
I love prog. Some prog is proggier than others! I also think at times there is a fine line or an overlap between prog and fusion.

So, Mahavishnu Orchestra: prog or fusion? Zappa: prog or fusion?

The answer doesn't change my enjoyment, but I think there are interesting discussions around the terms.


Very true... I was thinking the exact same thing regarding Zappa!

.... another is Hawkwind, Lemmy's early band!


Marley - 2/3/2020 at 12:17 AM

A guy I went to college with wrote a book about what prog is and what it meant! The genre's never going to be my cup of tea, but I enjoyed reading about it through the eyes of a fan and seeing someone defend it instead of just mocking its supposed failings and excesses: https://www.amazon.com/Show-That-Never-Ends-Rise/dp/0393242250


bird72 - 2/3/2020 at 03:43 AM

I don't like prog and love ELP. Confused I know. Saw ELP in 74 and they were mind blowing.


JimSheridan - 2/3/2020 at 03:48 AM

bird72, if you don't mind my asking, I'll ask: how does ELP end up being likable or avoiding those things that you dislike about prog?

(Despite being a prog fan, I do recognize that there are plenty of inherently goofy things about it)


bird72 - 2/3/2020 at 03:50 AM

quote:
bird72, if you don't mind my asking, I'll ask: how does ELP end up being likable or avoiding those things that you dislike about prog?

(Despite being a prog fan, I do recognize that there are plenty of inherently goofy things about it)


I think that they mixed the manic with the melodic quite well, if that makes sense. They were ying and yang in one soup. At least that is what I liked.


Lee - 2/3/2020 at 01:11 PM

quote:
I have been listening to a lot lately - Porcupine Tree, Steven Wilson solo, and Riverside. Also Steven Hackett solo stuff. Don't really remember Atomic Rooster, but I sure listened to all the others on your list. Steven Wilson has remastered most of King Crimson, Tull, and Yes to surround sound, so I have been buying all of those. He also did some of the XTC and Gentle Giant albums. The surround sound adds so much - especially Tull and Yes.....


Is Porcupine Tree that band that Chad and I went to at The Vic?


jszfunk - 2/3/2020 at 01:56 PM

Good topic. I actually have been on the lookout for some newer current prog rock stuff.

Someone mentioned Steve Wilson and Porcupine Tree . I have only
heard of him as an engineer working with Tulls re-releases, and trashing Greta Van Fleet. But not his band.

Maybe a case for some of these at time?
Flying Mastodon(heavy prog meta)
Wishbone Ash
Flying Colors
BOC
Marillion
Fairport Convention
Dream Theater
Fish
Kings X
Emerson Lake and Powell- dont forget that version!


[Edited on 2/3/2020 by jszfunk]


Stephen - 2/3/2020 at 02:45 PM

“Some prog is proggier than others” - best sentence of the thread! Kinda speaks to bird72’s about the melodic/manic - ELP is my tops all-time also of this ‘ilk’ - guessing Keith went aerial w/his grand piano at that show in ‘74?

Was real keen to hear what Cozy Powell would sound like instead of Carl, a grower it was not for me tho - tried to think of the album cover crazyjoe was referring to, maybe Brain Salad Surgery?

[Edited on 2/3/2020 by Stephen]


bird72 - 2/3/2020 at 03:35 PM

quote:
“Some prog is proggier than others” - best sentence of the thread! Kinda speaks to bird72’s about the melodic/manic - ELP is my tops all-time also of this ‘ilk’ - guessing Keith went aerial w/his grand piano at that show in ‘74?

[Edited on 2/3/2020 by Stephen]


Keith went aeriial! This was pre internet, of course, so there was no pre-word of what to expect. There was great red columbo in New Mexico then, and we got very primed for show. Along with the show was a cloud of smoke. So when that grand piano went in the flippin' air, everyone freaked out. The memories of live were incredeible beyond that. Greg Lake alone with an acoustic in the spotlight, 'you can be the strings on my guitar".... you could have heard a pin drop. Coupled with Keith Emerson going manic on the keyboards (Tarkus and more) was the melodic / manic thing I talked about.


stormyrider - 2/3/2020 at 04:34 PM

putting labels on music is often difficult.

Personally, I wouldn't call Tull prog rock. I would say RnR with some British folk influences, and a flute
Zappa, Mahavishnu I would call fusion
Phish has some "proggy" moments, but would not call them a prog rock band, any more than playing Rocky Top makes them a bluegrass band

open to interpretation


crazyjoe - 2/3/2020 at 05:48 PM

Indeed it was the cover of Brain Salad, that I always thought was so cool as a youngster! And by the way, after i showed this thread to my dad, he did chew me out, stating Zappa was definitely more an eclectic fusion of music, rather than prog rock!!!.........Peace......joe


gotdrumz - 2/3/2020 at 06:44 PM

quote:
I don't like prog and love ELP. Confused I know. Saw ELP in 74 and they were mind blowing.


They headlined my very first concert, Cal Jam


Sang - 2/3/2020 at 06:47 PM

quote:
quote:
I have been listening to a lot lately - Porcupine Tree, Steven Wilson solo, and Riverside. Also Steven Hackett solo stuff. Don't really remember Atomic Rooster, but I sure listened to all the others on your list. Steven Wilson has remastered most of King Crimson, Tull, and Yes to surround sound, so I have been buying all of those. He also did some of the XTC and Gentle Giant albums. The surround sound adds so much - especially Tull and Yes.....


Is Porcupine Tree that band that Chad and I went to at The Vic?



Yes - King's X was the backup, and the sound wasn't great for them. You left before Porcupine Tree.....or right at the start.

Steven Wilson has quite the career - he was in Opeth, and then No-Man. Then he had Porcupine Tree, and did Blackfield at the same time (Blackfield is not prog, but very good). He has been doing solo since PT, but just put out a new No-Man album. In his spare time he re-masters a lot of albums to surround sound. No-Man was with Tim Bowness, and Blackfield was with Aviv Geffen, who wrote most of the songs.


Lee - 2/3/2020 at 07:17 PM

quote:

Emerson Lake and Powell- dont forget that version!




That was a great album they put out. I think I was in high school at the time.


Regarding ELP, I saw them open for Deep Purple in like the early 90s. Kind of a strange show. Don't recall who was in Deep Purple at the time but it was fun.


BIGV - 2/3/2020 at 08:06 PM

quote:

1) Pink Floyd
2) Emerson. Lake & Palmer
3) Rush
4) Yes
5) King Crimson
6) Jethro Tull
7) Genesis - Peter Gabriel era
8) Atomic Rooster
9) Alan Parsons Project
10) Asia



During my time on this planet, I've owned exactly 1 (album/CD) from this group.

"Pictures at an exhibition" by ELP


JimSheridan - 2/3/2020 at 10:26 PM

I saw the triple bill of Dream Theater, ELP, and Deep Purple in the 90s when Purple kept doing triple bills (I also saw Nugent/Purple/Skynyrd as well as Edgar Winter / BOC / Purple). ELP put on a great 60-minute set.

jszfunk, I recommend Steven Wilson's "Hand.Cannot.Erase" album to you and to everyone else, really. It is modern melodic prog, not unlike Rush circa "Exit Stage Left" with a little Marillion to it. He brought in guitarist Guthrie Govan, who is like prog's answer to Jimmy Herring. "Hand.Cannot.Erase" is a beautifully moody concept album with very strong melodies. Wilson is not a great singer but good enough, like Steve Hackett.


Another concept album from relatively recent times worth checking out is The Decemberists' "The Hazards of Love." Very underrated. They are a college-rock type band who do dip into proggy territory.


I've heard Radiohead called progressive (not prog) - long moody instrumental passages, odd time signatures, strict avoidance of blues rock cliches. Hmmm.

The difference to me is that Steven Wilson or Marillion consciously echo 1970s progressive rock, whereas some modern progressive bands choose to avoid sounding like previous bands but do embrace the freedom to be indulgent.

My favorite Marillion album is "Clutching at Straws." It is not as heavy on lengthy epics as earlier albums but is very fully realized in terms of melody meeting drama; it's like their "Trick of the Tail."


jszfunk - 2/4/2020 at 12:21 AM

quote:
I saw the triple bill of Dream Theater, ELP, and Deep Purple in the 90s when Purple kept doing triple bills (I also saw Nugent/Purple/Skynyrd as well as Edgar Winter / BOC / Purple). ELP put on a great 60-minute set.

jszfunk, I recommend Steven Wilson's "Hand.Cannot.Erase" album to you and to everyone else, really. It is modern melodic prog, not unlike Rush circa "Exit Stage Left" with a little Marillion to it. He brought in guitarist Guthrie Govan, who is like prog's answer to Jimmy Herring. "Hand.Cannot.Erase" is a beautifully moody concept album with very strong melodies. Wilson is not a great singer but good enough, like Steve Hackett.


Another concept album from relatively recent times worth checking out is The Decemberists' "The Hazards of Love." Very underrated. They are a college-rock type band who do dip into proggy territory.


I've heard Radiohead called progressive (not prog) - long moody instrumental passages, odd time signatures, strict avoidance of blues rock cliches. Hmmm.

The difference to me is that Steven Wilson or Marillion consciously echo 1970s progressive rock, whereas some modern progressive bands choose to avoid sounding like previous bands but do embrace the freedom to be indulgent.

My favorite Marillion album is "Clutching at Straws." It is not as heavy on lengthy epics as earlier albums but is very fully realized in terms of melody meeting drama; it's like their "Trick of the Tail."


Thanks Jim ,will do.

Since reading this thread I have been on a big Asia Spotify binge today!!! Big Wetton fan. Palmer is a beast of a drummer.
Holy War
https://youtube.com/watch?v=9woc0clNlAU


jszfunk - 2/4/2020 at 12:23 AM

quote:
quote:

Emerson Lake and Powell- dont forget that version!




That was a great album they put out. I think I was in high school at the time.


Regarding ELP, I saw them open for Deep Purple in like the early 90s. Kind of a strange show. Don't recall who was in Deep Purple at the time but it was fun.
a


Yeah....Cozy is one of my fav drummers. There is a bootleg floating around of a live show from that era.


BrerRabbit - 2/4/2020 at 02:40 AM

quote:
My favorite Marillion album is "Clutching at Straws."


Never heard Marillion - Will czech em out thx. Always searching for new sounds. I dig the prog epics, Topographic Oceans, Thick As A Brick, Remember the Future


nebish - 2/4/2020 at 04:02 AM

Tangerine Dream


Sang - 2/4/2020 at 04:52 AM

Hey Neb - did you get the new box set from them - I really don't know much about them, but I am going to check them out. The box set also has 3 albums re-mixed by Steven Wilson. It looks pricey ($135-$160) but it is 16 cd's and 2 blu-rays.


Stephen - 2/4/2020 at 04:54 AM

quote:
Indeed it was the cover of Brain Salad, that I always thought was so cool as a youngster! And by the way, after i showed this thread to my dad, he did chew me out, stating Zappa was definitely more an eclectic fusion of music, rather than prog rock!!!.........Peace......joe


can see where your pop’s coming from (that made me smile too) - Frank’s music can’t be labeled (‘demented genius’?) - still got my coolio BSSurgery album w/the folding front covers & poster - vinyl rocks

Yet some of Frank’s stuff, like Zoot Allures, Bongo Fury, Jazz From Hell, Guitar, 1 or 2 others.....sometimes w/Frank, my PROGnosis shifts -


BrerRabbit - 2/4/2020 at 05:53 AM

Amon Düül ll - early German protoprog, from 1969, when the nascent Prog was first creating Its-Elf in the swirling primordial depths of Embryon:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=DT2Pk46nXU8



jszfunk - 2/4/2020 at 12:46 PM


Flying Colors - All Falls Down (Live In Europe)
https://youtu.be/Q76PXgQFQ0k


nebish - 2/4/2020 at 02:26 PM

quote:
Hey Neb - did you get the new box set from them - I really don't know much about them, but I am going to check them out. The box set also has 3 albums re-mixed by Steven Wilson. It looks pricey ($135-$160) but it is 16 cd's and 2 blu-rays.


I've actually never listened to them much. Just wanted to say they are pretty proggy!


Stephen - 2/4/2020 at 03:30 PM

quote:



Weird weird early proto prog deep cut, not one guitar in the group:

"Copper Sunset" by Aardvark, from early Canterbury Scene where a lot of proggers spawned.

The Jon Lord sonic signature will leap out at you - So striking that I dug deep into the webs to learn who first did this B3 overdrive. Deep Purple was from that same Canterbury scene but they werent doing this yet - the organ on "Hush" sounds like a guy doing kung fu on a Wurlitzer - nothing like this overdriven infernal growling beast sound - early Pink Floyd pretty much straight organ . . . this sound first hit on "Machine Head" that was 1972, this is from 1970.

I think Lord caught this group at a club, or picked up this record before it immediately tanked, and reverse engineered this sound:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=oB51dig1a0Q



[Edited on 2/2/2020 by BrerRabbit]


Dig that Copper Sunset, & have you ever heard the band Death Organ - grinding heavy duty organ that hits like a sledgehammer - their CD “Universal Stripsearch” from 1997 is the one I have, it’s awesome, & even has an occasional guitar solo - it crushes, including the take of Tom Sawyer - maybe not ‘prog’ per se, more perhaps like, organ style heavy metal? - fans of Jon Lord/Purple etc would dig

[Edited on 2/4/2020 by Stephen]


peccles - 2/4/2020 at 07:02 PM

A couple of good prog sites are progarchives.com and progessiveears.org/. The comtempory prog I like quite a bit are

Magenta
Big Big Train
Transatlantic
Anathema
Brother ape
The Flower Kings
Frost*
IZZ
The Pineapple Thief

ELP fans should checkout Carl Palmer's ELP Legacy. It replaces Keith's keyboard with a guitarist. Carl at almost 70 still brings it.


BrerRabbit - 2/4/2020 at 08:28 PM

quote:
Death Organ - grinding heavy duty organ . . .


. . . ok . . . lol



Will look em up - yeah that electroshock organ is cool, hits you in the guts. Similar though far milder effect as when I stuck a kitchen knife in a wall socket at age six - threw me across the room.



[Edited on 2/4/2020 by BrerRabbit]


Sang - 2/4/2020 at 09:02 PM

OK, so I listened to some Tangerine Dream last night from Amazon Music - I think it was a best of. No vocals, all electronic - sounded like the same song over and over again - not for me - although it could be used to go to sleep....

I have these Sleep phones - they are bluetooth headphones that are in a headband. You can wear it anytime, but they are designed for sleeping - the speakers are about as wide as a quarter. With the headband they don't slip much when you move around, and with no wires you don't get tangled up. (I think they sell them with wires and bluetooth). I got the model where you set them on a magnetized square to charge the battery instead of having to fight to plug then into a usb. They are great for trying to sleep - podcasts, music, sounds like the ocean, etc. I have tinnitus, and the buzzing is really loud at night when the house is quiet. Tangerine Dream wasn't too bad for that purpose - but for me to crank up my stereo to just listen too - think I'll pass. Guess I like some lyrics to help differentiate songs......

I also like Pineapple Thief - their new drummer is the guy from Porcupine Tree and King Crimson - Gavin Harrison.

Someone also mentioned Dream Theater. I bought one of their later albums and really liked it. Got tickets to see them in Chicago with one of the Crimson Projects. I was sick the day of the show and couldn't go, so my son went. I have only been too sick to go to 3 concerts - Derek Trucks Band when they recorded Songlines, Dream Theater, and Wilco. My brother and son liked Dream Theater, and I bought one of their live dvd's. I like some of their stuff, but they fit more notes into a song than any group I know - to the point of it getting tiring.......

[Edited on 2/4/2020 by Sang]


JimSheridan - 2/4/2020 at 09:55 PM

Brer Rabbit wrote: "Never heard Marillion - Will czech em out thx. Always searching for new sounds. I dig the prog epics, Topographic Oceans, Thick As A Brick, Remember the Future"


I dig Marillion but they have moved away from epics and have a more modern prog sound a la latter day Rush rather than 70s epics.


Some questioned Jethro Tull being prog. I guess the term is fluid, but they do have a lot of work that used odd time signatures, classical elements, epic-length songs, high drama - those elements.

Plus, they wore tights.

I can loosely fit some early Procol Harum under the progressive umbrella. "In Held Twas I" qualifies, I think.

Anyone listen to Caravan? Goofy old school "Canterbury school" progressive rock - not abrasive or edgy, just quirky, almost Monty Pythonish at times, though every old album would have one epic with a massive keyboard solo.


canuckABBfan - 2/5/2020 at 04:04 AM

It's great to see everyone's thoughts on Prog... lots of bands for me to check out!

I have Porcupine Tree Deadwing, I'll dig it out and take a listen.

Regarding Frank Zappa being prog or not, I'll need to dig deeper into his albums... I tend to only listen to Apostrophe and Zoot Allures.

Someone I do think had some prog moments was David Bowie, particularly the "Berlin Trilogy" produced by Brian Eno... Low, Heroes and Lodger.


Stephen - 2/5/2020 at 05:12 AM

quote:
quote:
Death Organ - grinding heavy duty organ . . .


. . . ok . . . lol




Only wish was smart enough to post a sample - it’s loud and bombastic yes, but musical & melodic too - Swedish band, think they did 1 or 2 other CDs, unsure - it. is. sla. min’


jszfunk - 2/5/2020 at 08:00 AM

Not sure which genre ,prog or hippy dippy jam bands have the most unique band names( I am trying to be nice!)


jparadise - 2/5/2020 at 04:29 PM

Personally, I thought the Super Bowl halftime show was a perfect example of Progressive Rock.


crazyjoe - 2/5/2020 at 05:18 PM

quote:
Personally, I thought the Super Bowl halftime show was a perfect example of Progressive Rock.


I really enjoyed some of the "innovative" camera angles............Peace.......joe


JimSheridan - 2/5/2020 at 07:31 PM

Well, the Super Bowl show did not feature cliched blues licks....maybe some tongue waggling but no licks!


Stephen - 2/5/2020 at 07:37 PM

quote:


"innovative" camera angles


“progressive” you mean - yep what was it prog-rocker Frank Zappa said - Shiek Yerbouti


hotlantatim - 2/5/2020 at 11:39 PM

I love some prog rock, but probably on whole dislike more than I like.

Thinking about it, I love about 20 Yes tunes (but they have a whole lot more that probably aren't my thing!), probably 20 Genesis tunes up through 3 Sides Live (plenty of prog after Gabriel left the band including my favorite Duke), the big 4 Floyd albums of the '70s plus another probably 10 total songs.... some Kansas when they got proggy, most of Rush's material up to 1981, few Asia & ELP tunes, Alan Parson's greatest hits etc etc.

That said, I was watching a Yes video from a tour about 15 years ago doing a more obscure extended suite and it just wasn't my thing at all. I've also seen Yes in concert twice and based on those setlists they were great shows.

So, i'm a prog fan, but have my limits!


dobro - 2/6/2020 at 05:08 PM

Finally! A nod to Kansas.


dobro - 2/6/2020 at 05:10 PM

Finally! A nod to Kansas.


Fujirich - 2/7/2020 at 12:31 AM

Given the venerable history represented here, I'm surprised we're this far into the thread and no one's mentioned Camel.

For those not familiar, they're UK-based and go back to the early 70's. They were definitely part of the golden age of prog, and despite leader Andy Lattimer's bouts with health issues (and member changes over time), have toured ever since. They recently released a DVD/Blu-ray of their last tour in 2018, with a show from the RAH. Its an excellent production (I had tickets, but due to some conflicts didn't end up going). They do the whole Moonmadness LP, plus assorted old and new classics. Anyway, here's a promo and some classics...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M0SqfOSdDsQ

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TakazuzJVPc

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_ttIdgbKBg

For my money, Andy Lattimer is one of the most melodic and expressive guitarists of the last 50 years, but has never received widespread recognition due to the genre.

Anyway, I've loved prog since its earliest. ELP in 74 was my first big show, and I've seen most of them since. Somebody mentioned Steven Wilson earlier - saw his Hand.Cannot.Erase tour at the Beacon and was really impressed. Wish I could have seen Riverside before Piotr passed away. I've got tickets for the Genesis tribute band Musical Box in March and can't wait. And I hope to get to Steve Hackett in NJ in March too. It might not be like the heyday of the golden age of prog, but its still out there if you look for it.


JimSheridan - 2/7/2020 at 02:04 AM

Good call, Fujirich. The only Camel I know is their all-instrumental "Snow Goose" album, but it is gorgeous music. I will check out your videos.

I look forward to reading your feedback to upcoming shows. Steve Hackett is a delight; at this point when many of my older heroes have been plagued by age, Steve Hackett really proves the exception. What a great show he puts on.

And The Musical Box! Oh man. I'll be seeing them on April 1st, no fooling. Can't wait.


Sang - 2/7/2020 at 02:23 AM

Seeing Musical Box (again) on April 11.......


BrerRabbit - 2/7/2020 at 02:27 AM

quote:
Finally! A nod to Kansas.


Little Yes On the Prairie

I love Kansas - saw them open for Hot Tuna in 1974, before they broke thru. performing in ripped jeans and tshirts. Phenomenal.


Dino - 2/7/2020 at 02:53 AM

Great thread .. enjoying everyone's take. It forced me to break out the following:

Kings X - Gretchen Goes to Nebraska ( i'm pretty sure this record is perfect )
Yes - Close to the Edge ( I know for a fact this record is perfect )

Now, prog rock? i always assumed if you loved Robert Fripp, you were a fan of prog rock...
( WTF is Dino talking about? )


CanadianMule - 2/7/2020 at 03:57 AM

quote:
Great thread .. enjoying everyone's take. It forced me to break out the following:

Kings X - Gretchen Goes to Nebraska ( i'm pretty sure this record is perfect )
Yes - Close to the Edge ( I know for a fact this record is perfect )

Now, prog rock? i always assumed if you loved Robert Fripp, you were a fan of prog rock...
( WTF is Dino talking about? )


Kings X is a good example of blurred lines between genres. Definitely on the heavy side. Awesome album either way.

Bands like Dream Theater? Absolutely Prog but absolutely metal. There are many of those types of bands that combine elements of various genres.

Yes - Drama is almost their "Heavy" peak and I love that album. Same goes for Relayer which I like as it is darker and rarely got played so it always sounded fresher to me.

Crossover from Prog to Pop
Alan Parsons Project - I love Tales Of Mystery And Imagination but I can't stand the later "radio friendly" stuff.


canuckABBfan - 2/8/2020 at 12:37 AM

quote:
quote:
Finally! A nod to Kansas.


Little Yes On the Prairie

I love Kansas - saw them open for Hot Tuna in 1974, before they broke thru. performing in ripped jeans and tshirts. Phenomenal.



I'm listening to the first Kansas album today.... excellent prog!!!

Anybody agree with me on the Bowie "Berlin Trilogy" albums?


Fujirich - 2/8/2020 at 01:27 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Finally! A nod to Kansas.
Little Yes On the Prairie

I love Kansas - saw them open for Hot Tuna in 1974, before they broke thru. performing in ripped jeans and tshirts. Phenomenal.
I'm listening to the first Kansas album today.... excellent prog!!!

Anybody agree with me on the Bowie "Berlin Trilogy" albums?
Saw them in the Capital Theater, Passaic, NJ a few weeks after Leftoverture was released. They tore that place to shreds - the crowd was going wild all the way to the last row. To this day, I've never seen a band play so tight. One of the best shows of my life!


canuckABBfan - 2/8/2020 at 07:26 AM

A more modern prog classic...

Queensryche Operation: Mindcrime


BrerRabbit - 2/8/2020 at 08:03 AM

This would be boss, Cruise To the Edge, March 2020



https://cruisetotheedge.com/the-bands/

mentioned this prog cruise to my brother, he texted back:

Close to the edge
Down in the water
Now we're forgotten
In Davy Jones locker


BrerRabbit - 2/8/2020 at 08:12 AM

Wow just saw Gong in that cruise line up! I love Gong.


canuckABBfan - 2/8/2020 at 11:42 PM

quote:
This would be boss, Cruise To the Edge, March 2020



https://cruisetotheedge.com/the-bands/

mentioned this prog cruise to my brother, he texted back:

Close to the edge
Down in the water
Now we're forgotten
In Davy Jones locker



Looks like a fun cruise!!!


Stephen - 2/9/2020 at 03:37 AM

Could the Moody Blues have prog leanings - wasn’t Days of Future Passed sort of, in retrospect, a prog sort-of opus recording - A Question of Balance, On The Threshold of a Dream.....I know the later ones, To Our Children’s Children’s Children, up to Seventh Sojourn

Neo-classical, quasi-space music, pseudo-new age....Their music invites labels galore, yet one of their big ones is I’m Just A Singer In A Rock n Roll Band


BrerRabbit - 2/9/2020 at 05:33 AM

^ For sure, Moodys. I would throw it in protoprog, the weird stuff that was brewing before anyone knew what prog was.

Really strange looking into what led to prog, where the rift happened - am thinking Iron Butterfly, Electric Prunes, the fringe music.

[Edited on 2/9/2020 by BrerRabbit]


Stephen - 2/9/2020 at 04:12 PM

Yes, & those mentions bring to mind the Beau Brummels, Amboy Dukes, The Main Ingredient....those type of bands which prog really grew off of/evolved/morphed into

Very cool looking cruise alight, gosh a 3 hour tour it is not tho w/that many bands, yow come one come all


Bhawk - 2/9/2020 at 06:54 PM

quote:
What is Prog Rock to you all?


When I was younger, the answer would have been "music you get made fun of for listening to."


Bhawk - 2/9/2020 at 07:07 PM

I once spent a good month of used-CD bin searching and listening to all the Van der Graaf Generator I could find.

I'm by no means the biggest metal freak, but Opeth is absolutely amazing.

Folks have mentioned Steven Wilson, that's how I found my way to Opeth. The Pineapple Thief, too.

Porcupine Tree is gone forever, but the Live At Tilburg DVD is in my top three live shows to watch, ever.


Sang - 2/10/2020 at 12:34 AM

https://progreport.com/top-30-prog-albums/

Top 30 prog albums 2000-2019 according to the Prog Report

30. Symphony X – V: The New Mythology Suite (2000)
29. The Mars Volta – De-Loused in the Comatorium (2003)
28. Opeth – Ghost Reveries (2005)
27. IQ – Dark Matter (2004)
26. The Pineapple Theif – Dissolution (2018)
25. Anathema – We’re Here Because We’re Here (2010)
24. Ayreon – The Human Equation (2004)
23. The Dear Hunter – Act IV: Rebirth in Reprise (2015)
22. Pain of Salvation – Remedy Lane (2002)
21. Dream Theater – Octavarium (2005)
20. Flying Colors – Second Nature (2014)
19. The Flower Kings – Unfold the Future (2002)
18. Riverside – Shrine of New Generation Slaves (2013)
17. Frost* – Milliontown (2006)
16. Porcupine Tree – Fear of a Blank Planet (2007)
15. Big Big Train – English Electric Pt.2 (2013)
14. Rush – Clockwork Angels (2012)
13. Tool – Lateralus (2001)
12. Transatlantic – Bridge Across Forever (2001)
11. Devin Townsend – Empath (2019)
10. Porcupine Tree – In Absentia (2002)
9. Spock’s Beard – Snow (2002)
8. Marillion – Marbles (2004)
7. Haken – The Mountain (2013)
6. Opeth – Blackwater Park (2001)
5. Neal Morse Band – The Similitude of a Dream (2016)
4. Steven Wilson – The Raven That Refused To Sing (2013)
3. Dream Theater – Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence (2002)
2. Steven Wilson – Hand.Cannot.Erase. (2015)
1. Transatlantic – The Whirlwind (2009)


BrerRabbit - 2/10/2020 at 01:27 AM

What about Dixie Dregs, was that Southern Prog?


BrerRabbit - 2/10/2020 at 03:38 AM


CanadianMule - 2/10/2020 at 04:49 AM

I guess there is crossover but I consider at least half of that Top 20 to be Metal.

Dream Theater's Six Degrees is a great album. A freaking musical workout for sure. Opening song The Glass Prison is almost 14 minutes long with enough notes to fill a thousand albums. But it is 100% Heavy Metal. Real good heavy metal but undeniable Metal.

I have seen them many times and they hold the record for the longest show that I have seen any band do. Just under 5 hours and not a single cover in the mix. The last encore of the night was Change Of Seasons and was just shy of 37 minutes.

The Glass Prison - Starting at about 9:30 - they just go off the charts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8h81PggfE8I


canuckABBfan - 2/10/2020 at 06:01 AM

quote:
I guess there is crossover but I consider at least half of that Top 20 to be Metal.

Dream Theater's Six Degrees is a great album. A freaking musical workout for sure. Opening song The Glass Prison is almost 14 minutes long with enough notes to fill a thousand albums. But it is 100% Heavy Metal. Real good heavy metal but undeniable Metal.

I have seen them many times and they hold the record for the longest show that I have seen any band do. Just under 5 hours and not a single cover in the mix. The last encore of the night was Change Of Seasons and was just shy of 37 minutes.

The Glass Prison - Starting at about 9:30 - they just go off the charts.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8h81PggfE8I





Seems like a lot of crossover with metal now in prog.... I've been surprised at all the metal drummers praising Neil Peart as a huge influence in their playing.

I have some early Dream Theater and really enjoy them.... their early drummer Mike Portnoy was a friend of Neil's.

I'm looking forward to checking out his new release Sons Of Apollo MMXX..... quite a band with Billy Sheehan and Derek Sherinian.


Bhawk - 2/10/2020 at 01:10 PM

quote:
I guess there is crossover but I consider at least half of that Top 20 to be Metal.


Well, there are 34,183 sub-genres of metal now, progressive metal is indeed one of them.


Rusty - 2/10/2020 at 01:39 PM

I'd accept the Moody Blues as "prog". What about Procol Harum? If Kansas is "prog" - what about Styx? I always found Styx to be a cheesey, top-40, poor man's version of Yes. Rick Wakeman's son - who filled in for his dad with Yes (briefly) cited Styx as an influence.


BrerRabbit - 2/10/2020 at 05:38 PM

I would classify Styx as "Schwog".


JimSheridan - 2/10/2020 at 11:40 PM

The term does get loose.

Did Styx have songs with long instrumental passages and classical flourishes that went far outside of blues rock cliches? Yeah, but at the time, they seemed like tame versions of what someone like Yes had done. As time went on, of course, they got very mainstream, so noone called them progressive.

I'm told early Journey (pre-Steve Perry) had more of a Santana / fusion sound. I dig Boston's "Foreplay" intro, which is like prog lite.


I think that terms like psychedelia and fusion had some overlap with progressive rock.

Someone mentioned Bowie's late 1970s stuff - those albums had Fripp and then Belew on them and focused on ambient sounds rather than virtuosity. I think they can be called progressive even if they don't sound like Yes. They can be seen as the precursor to what Radiohead does. They were wildly experimental


BrerRabbit - 2/11/2020 at 01:44 AM

Uriah Heep? They at least had Roger Dean cover art. Let's face it, Lawrence Welk would be prog if he had Roger Dean cover art.


gotdrumz - 2/11/2020 at 02:10 PM

Listened to Camel slot way back when


jszfunk - 2/12/2020 at 03:40 PM

quote:
The term does get loose.

Did Styx have songs with long instrumental passages and classical flourishes that went far outside of blues rock cliches? Yeah, but at the time, they seemed like tame versions of what someone like Yes had done. As time went on, of course, they got very mainstream, so noone called them progressive.

I'm told early Journey (pre-Steve Perry) had more of a Santana / fusion sound. I dig Boston's "Foreplay" intro, which is like prog lite.


I think that terms like psychedelia and fusion had some overlap with progressive rock.

Someone mentioned Bowie's late 1970s stuff - those albums had Fripp and then Belew on them and focused on ambient sounds rather than virtuosity. I think they can be called progressive even if they don't sound like Yes. They can be seen as
the precursor to what Radiohead does. They were wildly experimental


Good points.... I concour, the term does get loose.

Folks might disagree, but I have felt on some occasions that Govt Mule can get a little progy.


Fujirich - 2/13/2020 at 12:46 PM

New prog from one of the originals - Rick Wakeman...

https://ultimateclassicrock.com/rick-wakeman-the-red-planet/


Sang - 2/13/2020 at 09:48 PM

Starcastle was also a great prog band - from central Illinois no less. Their first 2 albums were excellent...


Bill_Graham - 2/14/2020 at 02:47 PM

I have read Qeensryche described as Prog metal especially their "Operation Mindcrime" albums. Definately not your typical 80's hair metal bands.


canuckABBfan - 2/15/2020 at 08:14 AM

From an interview with Ian Anderson...

"Progressive rock is a purely British phenomenon. And these days all of us and include the likes of ELP here, know that there was a sense of fun about it. Privately, we all saw the silly side, we were like John Cleese in a bowler hat lampooning the bureaucrats, while revelling in it."

"Any spoof done well enough enhances the perpetrators and intended victims, think of Spinal Tap and the heavy metal genre. But, surely if it's done too well then it becomes indistinguishable from the real thing?"

How does Anderson react to the fact that Thick As A Brick is frequently cited as the ultimate prog rock album?

" Job done, I'd say. We set out to make the mother of all concept records, as I stated earlier, and if that's the way people see the album after all these years, then we achieved the ambition. It is hard sometimes to differentiate what's serious and what's a send-up. But for me, that's the beauty of prog rock. it must have both."


Rusty - 2/15/2020 at 03:14 PM

John Wetton once said that much of the inspiration for what is known as "Prog" was rooted in English church music. If you think of all the organ, and the Catholic imagery (spells, darkness, light etc.) it makes sense. Upon being passed by the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, Chris Squire said that Yes' music had nothing to do with Rock and Roll.


Fujirich - 2/15/2020 at 04:43 PM

quote:
John Wetton once said that much of the inspiration for what is known as "Prog" was rooted in English church music.
Case in point...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73LmEiqXhOc


BrerRabbit - 2/15/2020 at 05:12 PM

Very churchlike. Choirboys on acid. Prog is basically classical jazz. Chris Squier said in his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame speech that Yes had nothing to do with rock.


canuckABBfan - 2/17/2020 at 07:56 PM

quote:
Very churchlike. Choirboys on acid. Prog is basically classical jazz. Chris Squier said in his Rock and Roll Hall of Fame speech that Yes had nothing to do with rock.


That's interesting.... when I was young I had a friend who was only into Pink Floyd, Rush, King Crimson, Atomic Rooster, Yes and Genesis..... I'd say to him, why don't you play some real rock!

.... now I love all those bands!


JimSheridan - 2/18/2020 at 04:28 AM

I like the consideration of how English church music shaped British prog. You can hear it in early Genesis, Yes, Procol Harum.

You can certainly NOT hear it in Rush. There are waves of prog, and Rush is definitely second wave. I mean that as no insult whatsoever, but it is telling that the first wave had that big Mellotron & organ sound, while the slightly later bands from North America did not, and King Crimson got rid of that element too.


BrerRabbit - 2/18/2020 at 04:47 AM

"Waves of prog?" Do you realize how weird this conversation would sound to all but a very few people? We might as well be speaking Westron in Middle Earth.


JimSheridan - 2/18/2020 at 05:08 AM

Hey, it’s not terminology that I invented. People discuss The Who as part of the second wave of the British Invasion or Iron Maiden as part of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal, and it makes sense.

If you follow prog rock classification, Marillion are (were) considered “neo prog” rather than prog as they imitated Genesis rather than actually progressing. The band IQ gets put in the same category.


CanadianMule - 2/18/2020 at 06:02 AM

Beware the Waves Of Prog and the perils that they bring.


This thread come from : Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band
https://allmanbrothersband.com/

Url of this website:
https://allmanbrothersband.com//modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&file=viewthread&fid=126&tid=149205