Don't click or your IP will be banned


Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band Forum
You are not logged in

< Last Thread   Next Thread ><<  1    2    3  >>Ascending sortDescending sorting  
Author: Subject: The Cicadas are coming-Brood X

Zen Peach





Posts: 19467
(19481 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 06:21 PM
...to the tune of 5 billion-plus. They come every 17 years, and it is a trip, to say the least.
Folks go nuts, especially the ones that are freaked out by anything natural or woodsy. Bus stops are particular worth checking out. These puppies hit the core of the city though, so it is fun to watch. They are not the usual green and black Cicadas either. None of my nieces or nephews have seen them, so they are just laughing them off. What is odd is that the area is split in half, with the eastern side getting their 17 year brood one year later. The countdown begins;



http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2004/03/0329_040329_cicadas.html#ma in



quote:
Cicada Invasion: Eastern U.S. Braces for Bug Swarm

John Roach
for National Geographic News
March 29, 2004


Get ready, Brood X is coming.
This May billions of black, shrimp-size bugs with transparent wings and beady red eyes will carpet trees in the U.S. from the eastern seaboard west through Indiana and south to Tennessee. By the end of June they'll be gone, not to be heard from or seen again for 17 years.

"Many people view them with horror or as an aberration and don't appreciate that they are a natural part of our eastern forests," said John Cooley, a cicada expert at the University of Connecticut in Storrs.

The bugs belong to the largest group, or brood, of periodical cicadas—insects that spend most of their lives as nymphs, burrowed underground and sucking sap from tree roots. They emerge once every 17 years, transform into adults, do the business of reproduction, and then die.

The cacophony of their courtship ritual disturbs suburban tranquility, and their nests can kill young tree branches. Females make slits in the branches and deposit their eggs inside. The process leaves many treetops with brown, dangling limbs flapping in the wind.

In addition to being a nuisance, the mass emergence aerates the soil, provides a feast to thousands of predators, prunes the treetops, and provides a pulse of nutrients into the environment, scientists say.

There are at least 12 broods of 17-year cicadas plus another three broods that emerge every 13 years. "A brood is a class year, like the graduates of 2004 who will be graduating this May," said Gene Kritsky, a biologist and cicada expert at the College of Mount St. Joseph in Cincinnati, Ohio.

A brood emerges almost every year somewhere, sometimes overlapping with others. But none of the emergences matches the pure size of Brood X, which includes three cicada species: Magicicada septendecim, Magicicada cassini, and Magicicada septendecula.

Keith Clay, a biologist at Indiana University in Bloomington is engaged in a long-term study of the Brood X cicadas. He said people's reaction to the 17-year phenomenon runs from disgust to awe.

"Some people leave town and go west where there are no cicadas. Other people plan camping trips timed in the middle of the outbreak, because they want to experience it in its full intensity," he said.



Cicada parties;
http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/03/12/loc_downs12.html

Cicadas could make your pet sick;
http://www.channelcincinnati.com/news/2983745/detail.html

Cicadas to screw up springtime weddings;
http://www.channelcincinnati.com/news/2980184/detail.html

Derek H

 

____________________

 
Visit User's Homepage
Replies:

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4269
(4273 all sites)
Registered: 12/4/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 06:26 PM
Cool.

 

____________________

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8042
(8056 all sites)
Registered: 1/20/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 06:35 PM
Oh no! I remember last time, it sounded like electric current outside, buzzing.
And they're just ugly! lol

 

____________________
"The two most important things in life are to find God and Love - everything else can wait"-George Harrison
"Whatever happiness is in the world has arisen from a wish for the welfare of others; whatever misery there is has arisen from indulging self"

 
E-Mail User

A Peach Supreme



Karma:
Posts: 2485
(2485 all sites)
Registered: 7/30/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 06:41 PM
I can't wait. The have a good taste to them!

 

____________________
Woke Up This Morning, Had Them Statesboro Blues.

 
E-Mail User

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 396
(399 all sites)
Registered: 12/17/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 06:46 PM
We had ours last year. They pose no threat to humans, unless a thumb-sized red-eyed bug hitting you in the face bothers you. They're clumsy as hell.

We could walk down to the edge of the woods on our property and see thousands of them. You wouldn't see them until you got close enough, then they were everywhere, covering every branch, not moving. You could touch them, get right up in their face, and they wouldn't move, except maybe to crawl a step or two if pushed. My three-year-old son and I had a lot of fun throwing rocks at the trees and watching them swarm around. Our dog thought they were mighty tasty.

If you have landscaping around your house (especially trees and shrubs) you can use landscaping fabric or tulle (pronouned "tool" - it's the stuff used in weddings - like the stuff ballet dresses are made of) to cover them up. It lets light and water in but keeps the bugs out. They can do some serious damage otherwise.

 

____________________
http://db.etree.org/jeck

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19467
(19481 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 06:53 PM
Actually, if you can get them just as they shed their outer shell they are pure white and tender.

quote:
http://www.markjcooking.com/recipex.php/59491

Soft-Shelled Cicadas




The indredients are:
60 Freshly emerged 17 year Cicadas 3 cup Flour Salt and pepper to season Flour 4 Eggs, beaten 1 cup Corn oil or slightly salted Butter
The recipe yield is:
4 Servings

They make great campfire cooking fare. For those who are interested, they are kosher! The best way to prepare them is to dip them, still alive, in beaten egg, roll them in the seasoned flour and then gently saute them until they are golden brown. They have a wonderful rich nutty flavor. Preparing them is simplicity itself.



quote:
Cicadas are a delicacy in the city of Shanghai, China, where this creative recipe originated.

Ingredients
Cicadas, anises, salt, rice wine, mashed garlic, celery, turnip greens.

Recipe
1. Boil the cicadas and anises in salted rice wine for five minutes, then remove the cicadas.
2. Sauté the mashed garlic, adding water and rice wine to make a paste.
3. Deep-fry the cicadas, then skewer them with bamboo picks. Arrange them on a plate with the turnip greens, celery, and garlic paste to look like the cicadas are climbing out of a mud pie onto green foliage. Bon appetit!



quote:
Cicadas can be added to stir fry and salads. They can be breaded and deep-fried as well.

Cicada Pie

2 pie pastries, slightly thawed
50 female cicadas
1 pint of cream
About 2 cups of stale bread or bread crumbs
1 tsp rhubarb flavor

Soak the cicadas, bread, cream and rhubarb flavor in a bowl until softened. Prepare the pie crust. Add the cicada mixture. Lattice the second pie crust over the cicada mixture. Cook at 350 degrees until golden brown (about 11 to 14 minutes).


DH

 

____________________

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1075
(1091 all sites)
Registered: 3/27/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 07:09 PM
We have them every year hear in coastal NJ. And along with them the Cicada killer wasps - supposedly don't hurt people, but real scary looking - about 2 inches long. So I wonder if they'll be tons of those wasps this summer. They love the sandy soil.

I've never heard of them only every 17 years. I sit out all summer and listen to them at night. Is that only for certain areas?

PeacHe

 

____________________
We'll all be singin' and we'll all be friends, Back Where it All Begins...

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 07:36 PM
If this thing is supposed to hit the coast I guess I won't be seeing much of it. Personally I like the bugs- that cicada sound really says "summer" to me.

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19467
(19481 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 07:54 PM
Jojpo, we have the normal cicadas here in the midwest every year, the green and black ones. But these are special, they only come every 17 years and are red in nature. 5 billion just in my area alone.

Marley, they will be as far west as Indiana so you might get some.

Strange stuff. KInd of like the fact that firefly/lightning bugs are not found west of the middle of Kansas.

DH

 

____________________

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1075
(1091 all sites)
Registered: 3/27/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 09:01 PM
Oh. I get it. So these are a special breed that is much more numerous. Wow that sounds fun. We live right on the edge of a marsh, just a couple miles from salt water. So we get lots of wildlife. We should have tons of these things.

Mabye those stupid wasps will stay busy in the woods instead of my back yard this year.

PeacHe

 

____________________
We'll all be singin' and we'll all be friends, Back Where it All Begins...

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8718
(8718 all sites)
Registered: 11/12/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 09:58 PM
I did some research on cicadas a few years ago, and trying not to repeat info in the excellent Natl Geographic article Derek linked in his first post, here are some excerpts from what I wrote. (Thanks for the natural history topic, Derek!) Comments today in brackets [/].

The family Cicadidae is represented in the United States and Canada by 166 species in 22 genera. The most important [economically, mostly in terms of tree damage] are the 6 U.S. species of periodical cicadas, all of the genus Magicicada, whose adult populations emerge only at the end of 13- or 17-year life cycles. . . . The common, or annual, cicada species are present every year. [Jojo, this is why in Illinois and where you live, you can hear cicadas every year, even not in the years for the periodical cicada broods, as Derek indicated. Also, even though a Magicicada brood's adults live only about 6 weeks, there are the other species, whose periods of adulthood overlap to fill the summer with cicada song.]

Beginning at dusk huge numbers [of last-stage nymphs] clamber up tree trunks or other vertical supports, anchor themselves, and split open the nymphal skin to emerge as adults, all within several hours. The dried husk can persist anchored in place for days like a large ghost insect. [These might startle you, because at first you think they're alive and are going to fly into your face. They might look decorative, clinging to a stick or a stalk, and I've brought them inside and "planted" the stick and skin with houseplants!]

Because it has wings, this one's an adult



The adults of the various species range from 1/2 to 4 inches in length. . . . The Magicicada species are about 3/4 to 1-1/4 inches. [Can you imagine a 4-inch cicada winging it through your yard?!]

The adults fly up into the treetops to sing and mate. They create the pulsating or clacking stridulation (a unique song for each species) on a pair of drumlike organs near the abdomen base. [You ever hear the racket made by a cicada stuck on its back on the sidewalk? I don't know how much of that is stridulation or just the wings against the concrete, but as it's furiously "backstroking" around on the sidewalk, it can't right itself. After a moment of being amused, I'll offer it a stick or a leaf to grab onto and get oriented.]

Cicada that's gotten oriented



 

____________________
"This is an old true story;
this is called 'I Must Have Did Somebody Wrong.'
(I wonder who.)"

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19467
(19481 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 10:08 PM


Note: Red areas indicate well established records. Green areas indicate less well established records. All boundaries are approximate. For more detailed maps, consult Simon (1988) or Marlatt (1907).

DH

[Edited on 4/8/2004 by DerekFromCincinnati]

 

____________________

 

True Peach



Karma:
Posts: 14274
(14326 all sites)
Registered: 12/20/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 10:15 PM
Hmmm. Scratching my head . . . I think we had a big rush of them about 12 years ago . . . Sang, you remember? Lefty? There were so many dead cicadas along LaGrange Rd. that they looked like fall leaves filling the gutters.

 

____________________

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 1075
(1091 all sites)
Registered: 3/27/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 10:39 PM
That's a neat map. The red area on the far right that overlaps PA, NJ, etc. - the far right point of that area is my town. And we do have cicadas, no doubt - wild.

PeacHe

 

____________________
We'll all be singin' and we'll all be friends, Back Where it All Begins...

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13909
(15926 all sites)
Registered: 3/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 11:34 PM
wow..this brings back some bizzare memories..in 1987 I was delivering bottled water..my 2 week route was in a heavily wooded area..those little suckers were everywhere...for those of you in the chicago area I was in Palos Park...LOL...remember how the street looks when they get smashed by cars?...
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13909
(15926 all sites)
Registered: 3/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/7/2004 at 11:42 PM
Actually, we get them too..It was 17 years ago Top..(see my previous post)...LaGrange Road was swarming with them....crunch crunch..you guys really eat those things?
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 20685
(20770 all sites)
Registered: 11/26/2001
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/8/2004 at 02:00 AM
Actually, the first name of the band I was in in high school was Cicada Invasion, and it came from a TV news story just like the one in this thread.

 

____________________
http://www.tylersmusicroom.org

 
E-Mail User

Peach Master



Karma:
Posts: 516
(517 all sites)
Registered: 7/10/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/8/2004 at 06:54 AM
Try riding a motorcycle with those things flying around!

 

____________________

 

Ultimate Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3142
(3143 all sites)
Registered: 11/4/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/8/2004 at 08:33 AM
It is pretty wild to say the least. Very Hitchcock-like.
 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 13909
(15926 all sites)
Registered: 3/14/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/8/2004 at 08:44 AM
I never even thought of riding a bike in that mess..we play a lot of biker functions...wonder if the boys will be a bit edgier this year..
 

Peach Extraordinaire



Karma:
Posts: 4269
(4273 all sites)
Registered: 12/4/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/8/2004 at 11:04 AM
quote:
Cicadas can be added to stir fry and salads. They can be breaded and deep-fried as well.

Cicada Pie

2 pie pastries, slightly thawed
50 female cicadas
1 pint of cream
About 2 cups of stale bread or bread crumbs
1 tsp rhubarb flavor

Soak the cicadas, bread, cream and rhubarb flavor in a bowl until softened. Prepare the pie crust. Add the cicada mixture. Lattice the second pie crust over the cicada mixture. Cook at 350 degrees until golden brown (about 11 to 14 minutes).


Derek, this recipe calls for FEMALE cicadas. How do I tell the difference between a male and a female, or do I really want to know? I hope it is not like sexing kittens.

 

____________________

 

Maximum Peach



Karma:
Posts: 8718
(8718 all sites)
Registered: 11/12/2003
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/8/2004 at 02:32 PM
quote:
We have them every year hear in coastal NJ. And along with them the Cicada killer wasps - supposedly don't hurt people, but real scary looking - about 2 inches long. So I wonder if they'll be tons of those wasps this summer. They love the sandy soil.
JoJo, here's more on cicada killer wasps:

Cicadas are stung into paralysis and carried back to the nest by the cicada killer (Sphecius speciosus), a large common wasp.









After provisioning each cell with one or two cicadas, the wasp lays an egg on the last one.



Each female cicada killer wasp kills about 30 cicadas a year.

 

____________________
"This is an old true story;
this is called 'I Must Have Did Somebody Wrong.'
(I wonder who.)"

 

Extreme Peach



Karma:
Posts: 3636
(1951 all sites)
Registered: 1/22/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 4/8/2004 at 03:52 PM
i'm sure bush is behind this...or cheney...yeah, that's it...it's cheney...that's the ticket!

 

____________________

 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 19467
(19481 all sites)
Registered: 6/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 5/17/2004 at 11:19 PM
Folks, they showed up.

Finally, in my neck of the woods, the 17-year Cicadas emerged last night. Personally I find it fascinating that an animal has an exacxtly 17 year time clock in their system..Very cool. Now the fun begins as the rest of the 5 billion, literally, come out to play. Bus stops downtown are a good place to see humans react goofily.
But tonight the conditions were finally right. There was some rain that loosened up the ground, and the ground temperature has to 64 degrees or higher. We have been looking , and there would be a stray one here and there, but tonight the trees were full of them as they crawl out of the ground and attach themselves to the trees, then molt their outer skin, dry their wings off, and try and not be eaten by the birds in the morning.

As ususal, the local press has gone off the deep end on these harmless creatures.
http://www.cincinnati.com/freetime/cicadas/

For example,
Workshops aim to calm fears; http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/05/13/tem_cicada13.html

Make your own paper cicadas; http://www.cincinnati.com/freetime/051404_create.html

Some areas brace, others aren't bugged by cicadas;
http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/05/08/loc_cicadaprep08.html

Bug fear sends school events indoors;
http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/05/10/loc_loc3a.html

Cicada Survival 101
http://www.enquirer.com/editions/2004/05/09/loc_cicadasurvive09.html

Goofy, but all in fun. The mating noise will not strat for a hwile, then it gets crazy.

Derek H



 

____________________

 

Peach Pro



Karma:
Posts: 468
(469 all sites)
Registered: 3/28/2004
Status: Offline

  posted on 5/17/2004 at 11:31 PM
Maybe these things only come out every 17 years in some places, but here in Middle Georgia, we see em about every couple of years. They do have a distinctive LOUD sound, but it just blends in with all of the other sounds of nature and folks around here don't pay them much mind. In fact, they leave their shells or exoskeletons all over the pine trees when they die and unless you're paying attention, that's how most folks know it's cicada season again.

 

____________________
Raise your window, baby...I can ease out somethin' slow.

 
<<  1    2    3  >>  


Powered by XForum 1.81.1 by Trollix Software

Privacy | Terms of Service | Report Infringement | Personal Data Management | Contact Us
The ALLMAN BROTHERS BAND name, The ALLMAN BROTHERS name, likenesses, logos, mushroom design and peach truck are all registered trademarks of THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. whose rights are specifically reserved. Any artwork, visual, or audio representations used on this web site CONTAINING ANY REGISTERED TRADEMARKS are under license from The ABB MERCHANDISING CO., INC. A REVOCABLE, GRATIS LICENSE IS GRANTED TO ALL REGISTERED PEACH CORP MEMBERS FOR The DOWNLOADING OF ONE COPY FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. ANY DISTRIBUTION OR REPRODUCTION OF THE TRADEMARKS CONTAINED HEREIN ARE PROHIBITED AND ARE SPECIFICALLY RESERVED BY THE ABB MERCHANDISING CO.,INC.
site by Hittin' the Web Group with www.experiencewasabi3d.com