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Author: Subject: What are your jazz recommendations?

Peach Pro



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  posted on 6/5/2019 at 02:23 PM
Also check out Chick Webb. Ella Fitzgerald was in his band when she was young.

Buddy Rich said Chick Webb was a great drummer and one of his influences.

In the 1970's Buddy Rich year after year would lead the Drummer World best drummer readers poll.
Steve Gadd, John Bonham, Keith Moon were among the rock band drummers below Buddy Rich usually in the top 25. Butch Trucks and Jaimoe never made the cut that I can remember. Jaimoe on Standback on Eat A Peach should have gotten Jaimoe on that poll.

There are several ABB album tracks that have only Butch on drums. But Standback is the only one with just Jaimoe on drums. Butch said that was his idea as he thought Jaimoe's style was perfect for the song and Butch wanted, if you will, Jaimoe play lead drums. Butch decided to just play percussion on that track.

Back in 1972 during the 5 man band tour, we use to hear Standback was originally an instrumental Berry Oakley came up with he called The Road To Calico. Gregg got hold of it, wrote some changes and lyrics and it became Standback. Oakley shares the writing credit with Gregg on that. And the album sold over 1 million copies. Oakley had to be making $$$ off that but sadly as Butch said, he just lost his desire to live in 1972 if it was to be in a world that didn't have Duane Allman in it

Dickey could be moody and a loner back then but Dickey was so close to Duane and Berry. When the original band played, Duane, Dickey and Berry were the ones making eye contact and making gestures to each other and often would form a simi circle. And Butch's eyes usually stayed locked on them. By December 1972 my how that band had changed.

 

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  posted on 6/5/2019 at 04:31 PM
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John Coltrane! You're already there with Kind of Blue, so maybe im stating the obvious. Great place to start is "A Love Supreme"


Last night the Los Angeles High School Jazz Band opened up the Dead & Company show at the Hollywood Bowl by playing John Coltrane's "A Love Supreme" with the band that segued into Shakedown Street. Really, really awesome!

 

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  posted on 6/6/2019 at 08:51 AM
Miles and Coltrane have gotten a lot of reccomendations and justly so. You might consider Cannonball Aderley, Chet Baker (mentioned previously) and Wayne Shorter just to give you a couple of more avenues to pursue. Enjoy!
 

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  posted on 6/7/2019 at 10:42 PM
Pat Metheny, Jaco, John McLaughlin, Miles Davis, Coltrane, Bill Evans, Wayne Shorter, Sonny Rollins, and Thelonious Monk.

 

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  posted on 6/8/2019 at 06:39 PM
HELP HELP ive been loistening to jazz music since the late 60.s.. have enoyed so manty artists and live shows. to small clubs... MY SUGGESTION GO TO PANDORA.. AND TRY DIFFERENT TYPES... CLASSIC JAZZ... ACOUSTIC JAZZ. BIG BAND JAZZ.. PUT IN AN ARTIST .. MILES DAVIS,,, JOHN COLTRANE...CHICK COREA.. OSCAR PETERSON ETC AND JUST LISTEN . LISTEN

 

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  posted on 6/8/2019 at 10:19 PM
Three albums I just purchased on vinyl come to mind.

Kind of Blue - Miles Davis
Idle Moments - Grant Green
Alone in San Francisco - Thelonious Monk

[Edited on 6/9/2019 by 74Jer]

 

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  posted on 6/10/2019 at 06:40 PM
If you explored the discographies of just SOME of the musicians in Miles' bands from the late Fifties on---Evans, Hancock, Carter Williams, Coltrane, Corea, Jarrett, Holland, JUST TO NAME A FEW----you'd have a large and VERY diverse jazz collection in no time!
 

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  posted on 6/10/2019 at 07:01 PM
If you are old school like me, hit your local library. Our small town library has some GREAT jazz CDs. I go in there and grab a handful at a time to absorb. Anything on Blue Note from the late 50s early 60s is good!
 

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  posted on 6/11/2019 at 06:29 AM
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I'd say keep working on the Miles catalogue. His different line-ups had wildly different sounds, each worth checking out.

Herbie Hancock's solo stuff is indeed very cool, from his non-electric stuff from the early 1960s to his very electric material from the late 60s early 70s. That Headhunters album is a big one.

I love Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album. Great fusion, basically the thing that spurred Jeff Beck into his fusion period.


As Beck tells it himself in the "Still On The Run" doc, it was hearing Mahavishnu Orchestra that convinced him to go instrumental.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2019 at 09:39 AM
quote:
quote:
I'd say keep working on the Miles catalogue. His different line-ups had wildly different sounds, each worth checking out.

Herbie Hancock's solo stuff is indeed very cool, from his non-electric stuff from the early 1960s to his very electric material from the late 60s early 70s. That Headhunters album is a big one.

I love Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album. Great fusion, basically the thing that spurred Jeff Beck into his fusion period.


As Beck tells it himself in the "Still On The Run" doc, it was hearing Mahavishnu Orchestra that convinced him to go instrumental.


I love Mahavishnu "Inner Mounting Flame" Have a friend who love music and it didn't work at all for him. They are a yes/no type of music

and re: what to listen to when asked to describe Jazz Louis Armstrong said: "If you have to ask the question you won't understand the answer."

Personally I just moved (downsized) and sold my record collection; the valuable part of which were c 1950's - 1960's Jazz Records I had bought in High School from my brothers girlfriend's mother (ex husband was a downbeat DJ). Didn't throw vinyl on that often - but missing my kids soetimes

 

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  posted on 6/11/2019 at 11:13 AM
My .02 is to stay away from anything with Vibes. I hate that stuff.

 

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  posted on 6/11/2019 at 11:37 AM


[Edited on 6/12/2019 by Stephen]

 

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  posted on 6/11/2019 at 07:41 PM
Dovetail,

Billy Cobham was the drummer for the Mahavishnu Orchestra; Jan Hammer was the keyboardist. They are both on Cobham's amazing "Spectrum" album from 1973 when they both were still with Mahavishnu. The big difference is that the guitarist was Tommy Bolin, not John McLaughlin, and the album is funkier than Mahavishnu, not as extreme. Beck's work sounds much more like "Spectrum" than like "Inner Mounting Flame."

Here's a solid Beck explanation from a great Guitar Player article:

One person who, after hearing the album, experienced an epiphany that significantly altered the course of his career was Jeff Beck. “Spectrum changed my whole musical outlook,” he once explained. “(It) gave me new life at the time, on top of the Mahavishnu records. It represented a whole area that was as exciting to me as when I first heard ‘Hound Dog’ by Elvis Presley. They were so inspirational to me that I started to adopt that type of music. Tommy’s guitar playing on Spectrum is fantastic, while Jan can flatten you with the first few notes.” The album provided the impetus for Beck’s landmark Blow by Blow, Wired, and the formation of a long and fruitful musical alliance with Hammer, which turned out to be a marriage made in heaven.

https://www.guitarplayer.com/technique/under-investigation-billy-cobhams-sp ectrum

 

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  posted on 6/12/2019 at 10:06 AM
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Joey DeFrancesco did a CD with Bobby Hutcherson, Organic Vibes -- like it well, the blending of the 2 instruments works real nice -- always did dig Lionel Hampton

All the mentions, MahavishnuO, Spectrum, Herbie H, great -- Brain Transplant, Alphonse Mouzon, great fusion stuff -- a San Francisco record was mentioned, another is The Cannonball Adderly Quintet in San Francisco --

one of my faves along more along that line ('regular/classic'(?), not fusion ) -- is the Geri Allen Trio's 21 -- with Ron Carter & Tony Williams -- great 'be-bop' (?) - sounding jazz pianist

Friday Night in San Francisco -- another live one from SF -- McLaughlin, DeMeola & Paco De Lucia -- where does THAT one fall 'categorically' -- right into the ears

The duelling guitars of John McLaughlin & Carlos Santana on their cover of A Love Supreme -- amazing fiery stuff -- love their version

[Edited on 6/11/2019 by Stephen]



The Mouzon release is "Mind Transplant." Also features Tommy Bolin on guitar.

 

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  posted on 6/12/2019 at 03:38 PM
Apologies -- you're right to glean that one word out of my post, and highlight it
Yes, MIND Transplant -- tsk tsk -- and Tommy Bolin is on it? Hadn't known that

Organ Grinder Swing, Jimmy Smith
Full House, Wes Montgomery Live at Tsubo

2 other jazz albums, if recommendations is still the discussion

whoops, make that The Incredible Jimmy Smith with Kenny Burrell and Grady Tate


[Edited on 6/12/2019 by Stephen]

 

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  posted on 6/12/2019 at 10:14 PM
I saw The Buddy Rich show. W/guests like Gerry Mulligan, Stan Getz, Lionel Hampton and others. On PBS from 1982. Great stuff!
 

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  posted on 6/12/2019 at 10:17 PM
Alphonse Mouzon's "Mind Transplant" is a terrific album. It is almost the sequel to Billy Cobham's "Spectrum," giving Tommy Bolin more chances to shine. It is more hypnotic.

Mouzon was a monster drummer. If you can find any albums by Eleventh House, check them out. It wa Mouzon with Larry Coryell. Great fusion!!!

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 08:38 AM
Kind of Blue is both incredible and accessible. Great starting point. I'd stay in the 1955-1965 to start.

Blue Note has some "best of" CDs that are a great band for the buck to pick up another half dozen. Get one from Lee Morgan, John Coletran, Art Blakely. 1960's Herbie Hancock.

Dave Brubeck Time Out (you'll recognize Take 5)

For some vocal stuff, Ella & Loius is a classic.

Stay with the accessible stuff to start before you head into the 1970s electric stuff.

And I find it better listening around the house than in the car for some reason. Enjoy!

 

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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 01:25 PM
hotlantatim wrote:
"Stay with the accessible stuff to start before you head into the 1970s electric stuff."

I half agree with this. Jazz from the 1950s in particular is very melodic and thus very accessible.

However.....my background is rock. Rock, rock, rock, rock. Guitar rock, blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal rock, jam rock. That was my gateway to jazz. Mainly, it was Jeff Beck's 70s instrumental stuff that then got me to Herbie Hancock and Mahavishnu. When I first started trying to listen to real jazz, Miles in particular, the lack of guitar in his 1950s stuff threw me off. Thus, for me, his electric stuff made more sense. "Bitches Brew" was and is a sprawl, but "Jack Johnson" and "In A Quiet Way" were right up my alley.

 

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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 05:29 PM
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Dovetail,

Billy Cobham was the drummer for the Mahavishnu Orchestra; Jan Hammer was the keyboardist. They are both on Cobham's amazing "Spectrum" album from 1973 when they both were still with Mahavishnu. The big difference is that the guitarist was Tommy Bolin, not John McLaughlin, and the album is funkier than Mahavishnu, not as extreme. Beck's work sounds much more like "Spectrum" than like "Inner Mounting Flame."

Here's a solid Beck explanation from a great Guitar Player article:

One person who, after hearing the album, experienced an epiphany that significantly altered the course of his career was Jeff Beck. “Spectrum changed my whole musical outlook,” he once explained. “(It) gave me new life at the time, on top of the Mahavishnu records. It represented a whole area that was as exciting to me as when I first heard ‘Hound Dog’ by Elvis Presley. They were so inspirational to me that I started to adopt that type of music. Tommy’s guitar playing on Spectrum is fantastic, while Jan can flatten you with the first few notes.” The album provided the impetus for Beck’s landmark Blow by Blow, Wired, and the formation of a long and fruitful musical alliance with Hammer, which turned out to be a marriage made in heaven.

https://www.guitarplayer.com/technique/under-investigation-billy-cobhams-sp ectrum


Well aware of the lineage you describe, Mr. Sheridan, and I note with great interest El Becko's reference to McLaughlin & co. in the quote!?

 

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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 06:46 PM
Totally. El Becko even toured with Mahavishnu. I think he was on a McLaughlin album in the early 2000s also.

However, I think Beck never sounded like Mahavishnu Orchestra but sounded a lot like Spectrum. The MO had strains of Indian and classical sounds, had violin, and had a big, precise, composed sound, whereas Spectrum was looser, bluesier, funkier, more playful. Those adjectives fit what Beck did.

 

Peach Master



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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 07:09 PM
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Totally. El Becko even toured with Mahavishnu. I think he was on a McLaughlin album in the early 2000s also.

However, I think Beck never sounded like Mahavishnu Orchestra but sounded a lot like Spectrum. The MO had strains of Indian and classical sounds, had violin, and had a big, precise, composed sound, whereas Spectrum was looser, bluesier, funkier, more playful. Those adjectives fit what Beck did.


And Jeff has played "Stratus" regularly for years (besides having guitarist Tommy Bolin and his band tour with him in 1976).

 

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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 07:25 PM
Marcus King played Stratus in Brooklyn.....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbTUzViOuJ4

 

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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 09:07 PM
Indeed. The late lamented Tommy Bolin died tragically after opening for Jeff Beck in Miami, Dec 1976. Had he lived and gotten his act together, I think Tommy would have been like Beck, an eclectic genius. So sad.

Both Warren Haynes and Prince have tackled "Stratus" also. It is like fusion's own "Goin Down" in terms of many folks tackling it live.

Here is a treat - another great song on Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album is the song "Red Baron," and Derek got the chance to tackle it with Oteil and Kofi and friends:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7-lLoI7NJo

 

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  posted on 6/13/2019 at 09:23 PM
Anything from Miles Davis 1952 - 1972

 

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