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Author: Subject: President Trump has the U.S. Economy growing at the strongest rate in over 13 years

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 01:44 PM
quote:
My financial improvements this year are due to an external source (Trump/economic policy), not a result of my personal decisions.


You didn’t choose your career?

quote:
--As tax rate drops, my net income goes up. <- tax rate decrease is NOT a result of my action or personal decision, it's a result of policy.


You didn’t choose your career?

quote:
--As stocks continue to go up, my portfolio "income" increases <- the increase is NOT a result of my action or personal decision, it's a result of economic condition.


Were you forced to buy stocks?

quote:
--As household income improves throughout the economy, my wife (a realtor) has greater labor demand which leads to greater potential earnings <- again not the result of an action or personal decision by my wife, this is a result of economic condition


Who chose her profession? Who forced her to get a real estate license? Who tells her wake up each morning and make calls?

I’m not trying to argue with you. I’m just surprised that someone can bust their butt their whole life to be successful, make your own life choices, and then credit politicians for it. I’ve seen friends and relatives get very rich in the past 10 years by opening their own businesses. To suggest it’s about Trump is funny to me.

 

Peach Pro



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 02:32 PM
quote:
quote:
My financial improvements this year are due to an external source (Trump/economic policy), not a result of my personal decisions.


You didn’t choose your career?

quote:
--As tax rate drops, my net income goes up. <- tax rate decrease is NOT a result of my action or personal decision, it's a result of policy.


You didn’t choose your career?

quote:
--As stocks continue to go up, my portfolio "income" increases <- the increase is NOT a result of my action or personal decision, it's a result of economic condition.


Were you forced to buy stocks?

quote:
--As household income improves throughout the economy, my wife (a realtor) has greater labor demand which leads to greater potential earnings <- again not the result of an action or personal decision by my wife, this is a result of economic condition


Who chose her profession? Who forced her to get a real estate license? Who tells her wake up each morning and make calls?

I’m not trying to argue with you. I’m just surprised that someone can bust their butt their whole life to be successful, make your own life choices, and then credit politicians for it. I’ve seen friends and relatives get very rich in the past 10 years by opening their own businesses. To suggest it’s about Trump is funny to me.


I totally agree and get what you're saying but I think there is a little misunderstanding. Nowhere did I credit Trump for my initial successes (college/finding a career/wife finding a career). I am strictly talking about my improvements financially this year, as stated in my original post. Trump didn't find my job for me or complete my MBA for me or turn my wife into a realtor. That is a result of our personal decisions and hard work. I simply credited Trump and our economic policy for the tax rate drop, rise in some stocks, and wife's current professional demand due to economic condition. Those three things cannot be controlled by myself or my wife. They are a result of real-world economics and monetary policy.

--I, myself, chose my career path but cannot take credit for the tax reduction as it was not a result of something I did.

--I, myself, chose to buy stocks but I, myself, did not make their value increase.

--My wife chose to be a realtor, but she did not decide to improve the demand of the housing market.




 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 02:57 PM
quote:
I simply credited Trump and our economic policy for the tax rate drop, rise in some stocks, and wife's current professional demand due to economic condition. Those three things cannot be controlled by myself or my wife. They are a result of real-world economics and monetary policy.

--I, myself, chose my career path but cannot take credit for the tax reduction as it was not a result of something I did.

--I, myself, chose to buy stocks but I, myself, did not make their value increase.

--My wife chose to be a realtor, but she did not decide to improve the demand of the housing market.


I can see your point about the taxes I guess, but you’re not selling me that the stock market and housing market is because of Trump. Stocks go up and down constantly - will you fault Trump when the stock market goes down in the future? Do you blame George W Bush for the housing collapse? I don’t.

 

Peach Pro



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 03:10 PM
quote:
quote:
I simply credited Trump and our economic policy for the tax rate drop, rise in some stocks, and wife's current professional demand due to economic condition. Those three things cannot be controlled by myself or my wife. They are a result of real-world economics and monetary policy.

--I, myself, chose my career path but cannot take credit for the tax reduction as it was not a result of something I did.

--I, myself, chose to buy stocks but I, myself, did not make their value increase.

--My wife chose to be a realtor, but she did not decide to improve the demand of the housing market.


I can see your point about the taxes I guess, but you’re not selling me that the stock market and housing market is because of Trump. Stocks go up and down constantly - will you fault Trump when the stock market goes down in the future? Do you blame George W Bush for the housing collapse? I don’t.


Touché, maybe I need to take the political blinders off regarding the stock/housing argument.Trying to do the whole "take a look from the other side" thing, but as you know its not that easy.

 

Universal Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 03:19 PM
quote:
will you fault Trump when the stock market goes down in the future? Do you blame George W Bush for the housing collapse? I don't


There it is.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 03:40 PM
The economy has been growing since 2010. If one wants to say that the growth hasn't been large enough or fast enough, there is that, sure.

On the housing market, existing inventory is hot but a correction is overdue. Demand remains steady to high, but construction loans and broker activity remain flat. A whole lotta houses got built before 2008, and with the rapidly aging boomers, there's going to be a huge over-inventory in housing sooner or later.

People have been trying to correlate politics and the stock market for a very long time, with very different conclusions.

BTW, anyone else noticing the stealth inflation at the gas pump and grocery store?

 

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Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 03:51 PM
quote:
Article today from Terry Savage. Her previous article was about personal debt rising to over $1 trillion in the US. At my financial adviser's last meeting they said inflation was up 2.8% (including gas and food). They said they thought the fed was raising rates even though the numbers don't support it, because if we go into a recession they won't have any tools available to them if the rates are already low.


The economy has always reminded me of one of those squishy toys that children so enjoy. If you squeeze the middle, the ends get distorted. If you squeeze one end, the other end bulges and changes shape. Same thing with the economy: If you change trade policy or interest rates or tax rates, the results are felt far from the part you squeezed.

That’s exactly what’s happening now. And as a result you’re going to hear more about subjects that haven’t been in the economic headlines for at least a decade, like inflation, rising prices and the value of the dollar. It’s time to get prepared.

Inflation on its way

The simplest definition of inflation is rising prices — although economists will tell you it’s all about money creation. We are definitely starting to see rising prices as the result of tariffs. When we put taxes on imports — whether they come from China or any other part of the world — those taxes are passed on to consumers in the form of higher prices.

Manufacturers that import everything from computer parts to tires to washing machines will try to hold prices steady so consumers aren’t turned off. But in the end they will raise prices just to stay in business. Whether it’s raw materials (think fresh vegetables from Mexico) or telephone handsets, prices will move higher.

And as the higher prices deter consumer buying, the slowdown will be felt by retailers and manufacturers alike. Instead of saving jobs, the tariffs will cost jobs. But it will take a while for the effects to be felt.

In the end, inflation is a monetary issue. Because if you fear that prices will be higher in the future, it means that your dollar will buy less. So workers will demand higher wages to pay for the increased cost of living. And higher wages mean more money chasing after things to buy, pushing prices even higher.

In the end, no one is better off with inflation. Just ask Venezuela, which is suffering with a 46,000 percent — yes forty-six thousand! — inflation rate this month. There are no basic supplies of food and water available at any price for worthless Venezuelan currency. And Venezuela has the largest oil reserves in the world, so the country should be wealthy. But it can’t pay workers to keep its refineries operating.

Higher interest rates follow

Future inflation expectations inevitably drive interest rates higher. It’s not just the Fed announcing small rate hikes that drives rates. It’s the marketplace where lenders of dollars, fearing that inflation will result in less buying power for the dollar, will demand higher interest rates to compensate.

Politicians can blame the Fed for their small increases. But once the global marketplace decides that the United States dollar is losing value because of inflation, there will be no way to stop rates from rising. After all, we have so much debt — more than $20 trillion — that we must keep borrowing, and paying the price in higher interest rates.

On a personal basis, debt will become a huge burden as monthly payments rise. Think of your credit card bills and your adjustable rate mortgage or home equity loan.

Downside of a strong dollar

But there is another negative aspect of higher interest rates. If U.S. rates move higher than those in other countries, our currency will become more attractive and rise in value against other countries. This “strong” dollar makes our exports more expensive because foreign buyers will have to scrape together more Euros, for example, to buy one dollar’s worth of our manufactured goods. As a result, sales of U.S. products are likely to drop, resulting in layoffs at our factories. Obviously, that was not the intended result when tariffs were imposed.

All these impacts, and we haven’t even mentioned retaliatory tariffs. They pose the potential to cost jobs everywhere from the farm belt to manufacturing to technology to retailing. The tariffs could be the biggest “squish” of all!

That’s the thing with economics. Our economy and the global economy are indeed inter-connected, like a giant squishy toy — with bulges and odd results taking place far from the original squeeze. And that’s The Savage Truth.


https://www.terrysavage.com/squishing-the-economy/


There is a lot there that I agree with, and a little I don't. Prices will be going up, that's for sure. The tariffs on imported goods, as well as raw materials for goods made in the US, will be passed on to customers. I read that prices for Maytag washing machines have have already increased 20% due to increased aluminum prices from the tariffs, and this is from a company that initially applauded the tariffs.

With inflation will come increased interest rates, and along with that it will cost even more to service the national debt (because everyone wants their tax money to go to paying interest instead of actually doing something useful with your money).

The part I disagree with is the strong dollar issue. Yes, a weak dollar makes US goods cheaper overseas. However, traditionally the US economy has does better during periods when the dollar was strong. Regardless, I think countries are going to start having second thoughts about lending the US unlimited money to service our debt. Didn't Trump once even say that maybe the US should default on our debt? Would you lend money to someone who even in passing suggested defaulting on a loan?

 

Universal Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 03:54 PM
"Stealth" ? Maybe kind of stealth for gas, but food prices are an outright kick in the teeth, climbing every week.
 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 04:14 PM
quote:
Touché, maybe I need to take the political blinders off regarding the stock/housing argument.Trying to do the whole "take a look from the other side" thing, but as you know its not that easy.


I applaud you! I hope Trump does help you somehow, but you deserve the credit, not anyone else, IMO.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 05:00 PM
quote:
quote:
Pathetic


quote:
I will exchange ideas and thought with anyone at anytime, until it becomes argumentative. One should be able to share a thought and hear an opposing view. If you disagree, you should be able to depart, knowing you've made the attempt. Seeing and hearing frustration because you will not continue to engage when there is no possibility in your mind of finding common ground is the red flag that tells me the attempt at conversation has come to an end. It's OK to just, walk away.


LOL, ok! You sound like one conflicted dude.

“Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views.”

- William F. Buckley


I did not bring up the color of one's skin, you did and I repeat, that is pathetic

 

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Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 05:11 PM
quote:
I did not bring up the color of one's skin, you did and I repeat, that is pathetic


I never said you brought it up, take it easy. I stated I believe race is at the root of hatred for Obama, just sharing a thought. You call it pathetic, after posting that you “exchange ideas until it becomes argumentative, and one should be able to share a thought.” You crack me up is all I’m saying.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 05:21 PM
quote:
quote:
I did not bring up the color of one's skin, you did and I repeat, that is pathetic


I never said you brought it up, take it easy. I stated I believe race is at the root of hatred for Obama, just sharing a thought. You call it pathetic, after posting that you “exchange ideas until it becomes argumentative, and one should be able to share a thought.” You crack me up is all I’m saying.


You are certainly entitled to your opinion

quote:
"I stated I believe race is at the root of hatred for Obama"


Could his politics have anything to do with it? Great orator and that is it, nothing, zip, nada to do with the color of his skin.

"Exchanging" ideas with you has proven to be an exercise in futility. This will be proven soon as your need to get the last word in will overcome any sensible rebuttal to the "thought" you've so graciously shared here.

Enjoy the day, I am "walking away".

 

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Peach Master



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 05:36 PM
quote:
quote:
THIS IS ANOTHER LIE by trump and muleturd. Trump still has the smell of putins balls on his breath.


Are you on public assistance or a monthly fixed income? How else can you be such a blockhead?


I am on social security and that fat orange **** wants to let his eunuch minions like Ryan cut that plus Medicare to reduce the debt they incurred with a tax bill that largely benefits the wealthy and/or those jerking their chains on the stock market....

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/30/2018 at 05:50 PM
quote:
Could his politics have anything to do with it? Great orator and that is it, nothing, zip, nada to do with the color of his skin.

"Exchanging" ideas with you has proven to be an exercise in futility. This will be proven soon as your need to get the last word in will overcome any sensible rebuttal to the "thought" you've so graciously shared here.

Enjoy the day, I am "walking away".


Wow! Where do I start....Your first paragraph made me think you wanted to share ideas. But then the last paragraph says you are walking away. Am I supposed to engage or not? You seem to be flustered a little.

As for your first paragraph, I do think conservatives genuinely oppose his politics, no doubt. I remember the Clinton bashing - it was a Disney movie compared to what I saw and heard about Obama. The criticism I heard about Clinton was rational. But if can’t say the same about the criticism I’ve heard about Obama, so I have always asked myself why that is. I don’t think it’s hatred for black people, but rather an insecurity that black people were “taking over” and they got scared, panicked, and developed crazy paranoia thoughts as a result. I never said that opposition to Obama means a hatred for blacks, nor do I think it makes someone a racist. When I say that I believe race is at the root of the issue, I’m referring to the insecurities I mentioned before....not that they are racists. Just sharing ideas,...take it easy.

And as for your second paragraph, whatever makes you feel better.

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 06:11 AM
Adding more mystery to intent behind the curtain at the Fed, raising interest rates now just so they can lower them later when necessary. I haven't heard that one Sang, but could be a valid point.

The threat of inflation is always there in a growing economy. Impacts from tariffs are just one component, admittedly avoidable. No need for me to go into another defense of their use on principle here I don't think. I would say that when people are buying more 'stuff' and companies are producing more 'stuff' for the higher demand in a growing economy prices for raw and finished materials can go up absent of tariffs. Tariffs can escalate that, but too many people I hear are failing to acknowledge there are other reasons for prices to rise, tariffs are simply not the only reason even though that is the only reason most point to lately. It is like saying that gas and diesel prices are higher because of increased state taxes. There are other variables that effect those prices outside of taxes, just as there are other variables that effect other product prices including steel and aluminum.

When my advisors have always told me to be more aggressive because "you have to beat inflation", as I often do, I take a different view. Yes inflation is an invisible force that lowers the value of our dollar, however we control our spending. In terms of fuel, we can drive less, we can car pool, we can invest in more fuel efficient autos. We can use less energy in our homes, we can invest in more efficient appliances. We can change our food buying habits and possibly grow some of our own food. As producers and sellers pass on their higher costs, we can defer some purchases making existing goods last longer and therefor getting more value out of them. So as prices go up due to inflation, or whatever else, we can control to a point how much we spend, when we spend and what we spend it on and what that means for our ultimate purchasing power.

My brokers have always said "unless you are getting 3% return you are losing". Sure I want more than 3% return on my munis or stocks, but I also just opened a 19 month 2.7% CD for some close to home safe money. If rates are higher in 19 months I might roll that over for another term. Everyone has to figure out their own deal. I like figuring out my own thing instead of following guidance more often than not. If I fail on my own accord I can live with that. If I fail listening to somebody else's advise I can't handle that.

[Edited on 7/31/2018 by nebish]

 

Peach Pro



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 07:14 AM
quote:
"Stealth" ? Maybe kind of stealth for gas, but food prices are an outright kick in the teeth, climbing every week.


Yeah, Kroger has hit me in the wallet here lately. A lot of this is due to the ELD mandate and trucker shortage we are going through right now, and its only going to get worse through Christmas. Trucks that cost me $4600 last month to get to KY from Long Beach are costing me $6000 this month. Craziness.
Also, the ELD has hurt the "new home" market as building materials and lumber are outrageous due to trucking costs.

 

Peach Master



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 07:40 AM
quote:


When my advisors have always told me to be more aggressive because "you have to beat inflation", as I often do, I take a different view. Yes inflation is an invisible force that lowers the value of our dollar, however we control our spending. In terms of fuel, we can drive less, we can car pool, we can invest in more fuel efficient autos. We can use less energy in our homes, we can invest in more efficient appliances. We can change our food buying habits and possibly grow some of our own food. As producers and sellers pass on their higher costs, we can defer some purchases making existing goods last longer and therefor getting more value out of them. So as prices go up due to inflation, or whatever else, we can control to a point how much we spend, when we spend and what we spend it on and what that means for our ultimate purchasing power.
[Edited on 7/31/2018 by nebish]


You are completely correct here. In reality most people forget this advise and borrow the difference.

 

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Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 08:09 AM
quote:
Could his politics have anything to do with it? Great orator and that is it, nothing, zip, nada to do with the color of his skin.

"Exchanging" ideas with you has proven to be an exercise in futility. This will be proven soon as your need to get the last word in will overcome any sensible rebuttal to the "thought" you've so graciously shared here.



“Liberals claim to want to give a hearing to other views, but then are shocked and offended to discover that there are other views.”

- William F. Buckley

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 08:48 AM
I found this post below to be fascinating, so I thought I’d break it down and provide my feedback.

quote:
I will exchange ideas and thought with anyone at anytime, until it becomes argumentative.


Notice he doesn’t mention what types of ideas and thoughts, just that he will exchange them. In my case in this thread, he exchanged his idea and thought that my post was pathetic.

“until it gets argumentative”.....again, no mention of who initiated the argument or who even decides that it is an argument, leaving it open ended. He isn’t saying who caused it, just that it is now an argument.

quote:
One should be able to share a thought and hear an opposing view. If you disagree, you should be able to depart, knowing you've made the attempt


Made the attempt at what? He doesn’t say. It’s vague, maybe intentionally. In our exchange, he departed, but only attempted to call it pathetic before saying he is departing. This leads me to believe he was referring to himself when he wrote this post....he should’ve been able to make a civil “attempt” at discussion, but alas, he got flustered and departed.

quote:
Seeing and hearing frustration because you will not continue to engage when there is no possibility in your mind of finding common ground is the red flag that tells me the attempt at conversation has come to an end.


Here he is warning everyone. He wouldn’t continue to engage with me, because there was no possibility for him to find common ground with my opinion about race. He noticed his own red flag, and recognized the conversation should end, and so he departed.

quote:
It's OK to just, walk away.


Yes it is brotha, yes it is. Took me a while to understand, but I think I get it now.


 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 11:23 AM
Reading back through the thread I thought Bhawk mentioned something I have not thought about, the housing market related to baby boomers and when those homes will be coming on the market. More homes on the market, more competition, definitely creates downward pressure on listing and sales prices.

The oldest boomers, ones that I know, have already moved and downsized into condo type places, while others still are in their life-long home and then the younger ones just entering retirement or on the cusp and haven't made that move yet. Wondering what somebody from the industry might think about this? I have a realtor friend, will have to ask next time I see him.

It seems at one time the stories read that millennials were not interested in home ownership, although as time has gone on, the great recession is further behind us and they get older some of that is changing.

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 11:30 AM
Some say 70%+ of employment costs are comprised of wages and beneifts.

quote:
U.S. Employment Costs Increase From Year Ago by Most Since 2008
By Sho Chandra
July 31, 2018, 8:30 AM EDT

U.S. employment costs accelerated in the second quarter from a year ago by the most in this expansion on faster growth in worker pay and benefits, according to Labor Department data released Tuesday.

Highlights of Employment Cost Index (2Q)

Employment cost index rose 2.8% y/y, the most since 3q 2008, after 2.7% gain

ECI climbed 0.6% m/m (est. 0.7%) after 0.8% increase

Wages and salaries rose 2.8% y/y, also the biggest gain since 3q 2008; benefits costs jumped 2.9% y/y, most since 4q 2011

Private-sector wages and salaries advanced 2.9% y/y for a second quarter

Key Takeaways

The latest results indicate employers are offering better compensation packages to workers amid an ongoing shortage of qualified workers. In another sign of broad-based demand for labor, the ECI showed increases in manufacturing, construction and service-related industries.

While labor costs are rising, there are few signs that they'll trigger heightened inflation pressures. Economists expect the Federal Reserve will still raise interest rates gradually this year.

The government’s quarterly read on the ECI -- covering employer- paid taxes such as Social Security and Medicare in addition to the cost of wages and benefits -- offers a comprehensive look at how American workers are being compensated.

Average hourly earnings, a separate monthly measure of private- sector wages that can be influenced by shifts in industry employment and hours worked, have been rising moderately in this expansion relative to the strength of the job market.

Other Details

Employment costs for manufacturers rose 2.9 percent from a year ago; construction up 3 percent and private service providers up 2.9 percent

Benefit costs in private industry rose 2.8 percent from second quarter of 2017, after increasing 2.5 percent

Employers costs for health benefits increased 1.6 percent from a year earlier

— With assistance by Chris Middleton

https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2018-07-31/u-s-employment-costs-inc rease-from-year-ago-by-most-since-2008


 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 01:25 PM
The economy has been on a steady incline since 2009, period. Great job by Obama to turn around the disaster created by the Republican administration of W Bush, who bankrupted the country. Not only did Obama reverse course on Bush’s stumbling mess, but he turned it around all while being sabotaged along the way by white people who melted down over a half black President. Trump is just riding Obama’s wave, as usual. Trump has even admitted this....I’ve heard a dozen separate instances of Trump justifying his policies by saying, “Obama did the same thing when he was in office”. I think the President has a man crush on Obama. It’s funny to watch Trump and Putin tremble like b*tches at the mere mention of Obama’s name, let alone seeing him face to face. Ever see the photos of both Trump and Putin looking down in shame as they shake Obama’s hand, while Obama stares them down right to their face? Priceless!




[Edited on 7/31/2018 by BoytonBrother]

 

Peach Pro



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  posted on 7/31/2018 at 01:30 PM
quote:
Reading back through the thread I thought Bhawk mentioned something I have not thought about, the housing market related to baby boomers and when those homes will be coming on the market. More homes on the market, more competition, definitely creates downward pressure on listing and sales prices.

The oldest boomers, ones that I know, have already moved and downsized into condo type places, while others still are in their life-long home and then the younger ones just entering retirement or on the cusp and haven't made that move yet. Wondering what somebody from the industry might think about this? I have a realtor friend, will have to ask next time I see him.

It seems at one time the stories read that millennials were not interested in home ownership, although as time has gone on, the great recession is further behind us and they get older some of that is changing.


A supply of available homes here in Central KY is non-existent while the demand is booming. As for the whole "baby boomer sell off", the industry did expect this to happen over the last half-decade or so but unfortunately it never transpired. Boomer's are actually now considered the least likely age group to sell their homes. Where I live there are very few "buildable" lots left but unfortunately construction costs are through the roof and with down payment requirements, etc. many millennials are still being forced to rent.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 8/1/2018 at 05:55 PM
quote:

My brokers have always said "unless you are getting 3% return you are losing". Sure I want more than 3% return on my munis or stocks, but I also just opened a 19 month 2.7% CD for some close to home safe money. If rates are higher in 19 months I might roll that over for another term. Everyone has to figure out their own deal. I like figuring out my own thing instead of following guidance more often than not. If I fail on my own accord I can live with that. If I fail listening to somebody else's advise I can't handle that.




Good for you. With all the volatility, my guys have been suggesting only going out 6 months at a time instead of locking in for a longer period. Mostly because I am investing instead of needing it to live, I have been doing that. Just got a 6 month cd for 2% - with the hope that in 6 months the rate will be higher.

 

Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 8/1/2018 at 06:48 PM
quote:
quote:

My brokers have always said "unless you are getting 3% return you are losing". Sure I want more than 3% return on my munis or stocks, but I also just opened a 19 month 2.7% CD for some close to home safe money. If rates are higher in 19 months I might roll that over for another term. Everyone has to figure out their own deal. I like figuring out my own thing instead of following guidance more often than not. If I fail on my own accord I can live with that. If I fail listening to somebody else's advise I can't handle that.




Good for you. With all the volatility, my guys have been suggesting only going out 6 months at a time instead of locking in for a longer period. Mostly because I am investing instead of needing it to live, I have been doing that. Just got a 6 month cd for 2% - with the hope that in 6 months the rate will be higher.


Sang - Exactly the right strategy. With the Fed expected to increase rates several more times, if one is purchasing CD's, the prudent strategy is short term with expectations to roll over into a higher rate upon maturity.

 
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