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Author: Subject: What Drew You In?

Zen Peach





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  posted on 2/1/2002 at 06:36 PM
I don't remember ever seeing a thread like this before. What (song/lick/whatever) first drew you to Duane (and the Brothers)?
For me, it was hearing the original Dreams -- it was actually on Volume 1 of the Anthology, but it was the original album version. That was the summer of '96, and nothing's been the same since then. Peace. --Marley

 

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Peach Head



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  posted on 2/1/2002 at 09:18 PM
mine would be Dont Want You No More after the first time i heard it....

long story- but i have time....

it was my step-dad's b-day... he said he was trying to replace the lps that he loved with the cd format... he asked me if columbia house had Beginnings- i checked and ordered it for him... it came and that night we listened to it- i heard the opening part and i knew right then that my music tastes were changed (before ABB i liked grunge rock)...

 

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  posted on 2/2/2002 at 01:07 AM
As Tom said, nice thread. He is right in that, I listen to the original line up shows more than any other. And the sound don't have to necessarily be a crystal soundboard. I mean, do you want to expereince greatness or not? Like people complaining about a poorly preserved Van Gogh or Vermeer. It's still the REAL thing.

What got me into the ABB was actually Jessica, as I couldn't get enough of the piano solo. I do remember seeing a picture of Duane before I ever got into the Allmans... the one with him playing a guitar on the bed in the hotel. I was shocked that he had been gone since 71'.

Well, when I listened to the other tracks on their greatest hits package, I noticed that the piano player (Chuck) was not present on certain songs, & was replaced by another guitar player. Obviously in reality, the order is the other way around.

LOVED One Way Out, & especially Little Martha. Later on, my ears gained the necessary experience for taking in a song over 5 minutes. Played it on acoustic a few times... led to Layla.....Coltrane.... what the ABB music taught me was to be OPEN MINDED with music. Don't stereotype, & find out for yourself if you dig it or not.

Marley, Dreams was actually one of the last songs I "took in" to. What got me hooked on Dreams was listening to Duane play it live. Arguably, his finest song.

Again, great thread.

 
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Zen Peach



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  posted on 2/2/2002 at 10:40 AM
Tom,
Repeat all you want. I feel much the same way about Duane, I definitely think about him daily. Remarkable guy. The fact that he's touched so many people with his music over the years is an affirmation of the principles he lived. Peace. --Marley

 

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  posted on 2/3/2002 at 03:18 PM
Anything I say here will basically mirror Tom's so even though I'm told I'm good at it,I won't repeat myself.Seriously,though it never ceases to amaze me how many people Duane reached in his short life,to say nothing of his talent.There is never anything negative here and it's always a pleasure to read what Duane's fans have to say. I listen to some Duane every day,like a bunch of folks around here do.

 

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  posted on 2/3/2002 at 04:01 PM
I remember the first time I ever heard Elizabeth Reed from the Fillmore East album. I liked the allman brothers before then; which is to say I had a greatest hits album. A friend of mine loned me Fillmore East and I just about passed out at the peak of Duane's solo on liz reed. I don't think any other work of art (music, or otherwise) has ever affected me like that. Since then I've been listening to anything from the Duane era that I can get my hands on.
 

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  posted on 2/4/2002 at 08:04 AM
Like Finsky I listen to the original lineup more than any other. What drew me in was Idlewild South -- those first few acoustic chords of Revival drew me in and kept me there through the first side. As Marley said in Berry thread, Duane, Dickey and Berry gave an entirely new idiom to the universal language of music.
I agree too brother, that Jessica was special moment too -- Bros. and Sisters was released seemingly the minute we got back from Watkins Glen, and for awhile the first four albums were supplanted on my turntable!

 

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  posted on 2/4/2002 at 09:26 PM
Marley,that anthology 1 is a emotionally intense piece of work. That side with the brothers was my first actually owned record of theirs. Having listen to them for a few years before in dorms and on car tape decks. I then realized what a great talent Duane was and how much we truly lost on 10/29/71. When that record was given to me as christmas gift 12/25/72, I was forever a Duane fan.

 

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  posted on 2/5/2002 at 08:41 AM
Marley, I was 16 or 17 and thought Lynaryd Skynaryd (sp) was pretty hot. Just beginning to get into the blues. A friends brother-in-law said LS is ok but listen to these guys. We were hooked.

It was '81 and harder to find music worth listening to. P funk was dying and I spent the decade going to dead shows. The first ABB album I bought was beginnings.

I think what hooked me to Duane was listening to Eat a Peach. Strange since he is not on the whole album. I think EAP shows the growth he was still going through. The slide work on Stand Back is just soooo sharp.

But the clincher is listening to Mountain Jam with the headphones on. You know the Daune part right after Berry's lead. That is incredible!!!

 

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  posted on 2/5/2002 at 09:52 AM
What drew me to Duane? Well, I'd already loved the ABB, and was pretty lost in there music for about a year, but when I got the Layla Box set and listened to the Jams disc, Jam V, I was blown away by Duane's power. Then came his version of Goin' Down Slow, We've dubbed it the silencer. The room just gets quiet whenever I put it on, and not by force! Peace
Josh

 

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  posted on 2/5/2002 at 12:59 PM
The first time I listened to "You don't Love Me" on the Fillmore album when the band stops and Duane play's this cool solo by him self before Dickey starts his I was hooked.
 
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Zen Peach



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  posted on 2/9/2002 at 07:07 PM
That's definitely a very powerful moment. During that solo, you can feel Duane carrying the entire Fillmore East on his back. It's his show, and he's the only one who could do that. That's what makes a musician into a guitar hero, you know?
To be more specific about answering my own question, I think the moment that caught my attention first was specifically the chorus of Dreams. The quick, building notes and high fills. Very exciting stuff. Peace. --Marley

 

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  posted on 2/10/2002 at 03:37 PM
The first ABB album I ever heard- not counting the Anthology- was probably Beginnings. My dad ended up letting me keep that copy. I didn't realize how good it was the first time I'd heard it- I got hooked on a live show first. 02.28.71, Columbia, Missouri. Brewers Fieldhouse. I remember that without looking at the tape.
I can still recall laying back on the couch at my grandparents house, eyes shut, sort of meditating to that music. Elizabeth Reed especially. It felt like I was flying. If Dreams drew me in, maybe that got me hooked. The Dreams on that show, btw, is utterly fantastic. The two competed for the 'favorite song' title for a long time after that. That must have been January '97. Two months later came my first Beacon show. 20 more since that, and counting. And so The Road Goes On. Peace. --Marley

 

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  posted on 2/13/2002 at 08:20 PM
LIKE MANY SHOWS OPENED WITH.
STATESBORO BLUES DOES IT FOR ME.

 

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  posted on 2/16/2002 at 11:38 PM
An excellent question. I'm not sure anymore what got me listening to the Brothers. At first I just gave it a glance and didnt really think much of their music. After a while however it began to grow on me. Now I dont think that there was ever a heavier band ever than the early Brothers stuff. The cohesion that the band shares is absolutely amazing. They could play a slower tune or kick it in the ass and play some heavier and louder stuff. Their jams are also some of the tightest stuff I've ever heard. Mountain Jam in specific is just breathtaking. There is no wasted improv in the song, no filler **** , just kick ass tunes. I only wish that I was born a few decades earlier so I could have heard the original members together
 
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  posted on 2/17/2002 at 06:11 PM
quote:
That's definitely a very powerful moment. During that solo, you can feel Duane carrying the entire Fillmore East on his back. It's his show, and he's the only one who could do that. That's what makes a musician into a guitar hero, you know?


Absolutely Marley. The first ABB album I ever purchased was Eat a Peach but it was the Fillmore album that opened my eyes to what Duane Allman brought to the table. Every note he played seemed to force me to pay attention. I can still remember kicking back on my couch listening to the entire album from beginning to end and when it was finished playing it again without hesitation. I was overwhelmed and couldnt wait to share it with someone not in the know.

Unfortunately the euphoria was followed by a bit of anger that he was gone. I felt somewhat cheated.


There just aren't musicians like that today in rock.

 

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  posted on 2/18/2002 at 07:25 AM
Marley, great thread. I know when we were at the Atlanta Pop festival as we walked through the woods someone said the Allman Brothers were playing the free stage. We giggled something about "seeing the Osmond Brothers" and headed for the stage. As we got closer to the stage we heard a sound unlike any other we'd heard before. Of course it was Brother Duane and that corcidin bottle was making magic up there. I have been totally hooked ever since that moment. We bought the first album the minute we got back to Naples and played it until you could see through it. Duanes music has been a part of me ever since the fourth of July weekend, 1970.
Johnny[Edited on 2/18/2002 by Johnny]

 

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  posted on 2/18/2002 at 04:34 PM
Philip,
There just aren't musicians like that anywhere. But hey: if there was anyone else like Duane Allman, he wouldn't be Duane Allman. Yeah, that's circular, but that's how I like to say it. Peace. --Marley

 

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  posted on 2/18/2002 at 04:44 PM
I saw a copy of Jim Marshall's book, Not Fade Away (great title, eh?), in a Borders near me today. I couldn't afford a copy, but I decided I could afford a look anyway. I flipped it open, and the first thing I saw was this quote:
"This is my first book. I would like to respectfully dedicate it to the late Duane Allman
and the late Tom Jans,
who were like the brothers I never had.
"
There was one ABB picture inside that I saw. It was the cover photo for At Fillmore East. Marshall wrote that the photo was taken in Macon (I'd heard that it was taken in front of the Warehouse in New Orleans). He explains the way the guys are smiling (a mystery that remains as elusive as the smile on the Mona Lisa) by saying, "As best we could tell, I had the only cocaine in Macon, Georgia, that day. So what I remember saying is, 'I want one shot laughing - no laughing, no dope.' "
On the next page is one of the wonderful pictures of Duane in a motel bathroom, playing guitar. He looks totally at one with everything, and it's a beautiful shot. I'll put the whole caption here because I think what Marshall wrote is really moving:
"There's not a lot I can say about Duane Allman without writing volumes. In all my life I've met few people like him. When I did the album cover for At Fillmore East, he told the record company that he wanted to do it my way, no restrictions. It's really hard to talk about this kid. This shot was taken in the bathroom of the Holiday Inn before Duane, my ex-wife, Rebecca, and I ate dinner at my mom's place -- the rest of the band ate in the hotel and got sick.
To me, the soul of the Allman Brothers Band died when Duane passed way. The day he died, I walked the streets of San Fransisco for about fourteen hours. This is a kid who makes me cry, and I still do sometimes when I look at this picture. He was just one of the guys. He's been gone over 25 years now, and his music is still as fresh as the day he wrote it."
What else is there to say? Peace. --Marley[Edited on 2/18/2002 by Marley]

 

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  posted on 2/22/2002 at 12:23 PM
When I was in High School, my friends and I would loot the college next to where we lived after all the students would leave for summer vacation. They would just leave piles of what they considered trash in the dorm hallways- everything from CD's to mountain bikes! Anyway, one of my friends found the BIG SCORE- over three hundred CD's once we counted them all. Among them was the second disc of the remastered Fillmore East show. A few years later when I was in college I heard Whipping Post and thought it was a good song. I asked him if I could borrow that disc. He gave it to me and said he never listened to it. I discovered it had Whipping Post on it and listened to that song over and over for a few days- but that isn't what hooked me.

I was listening to WP and getting ready for bed one night and decided to see what else was on the CD. Of course, Mountain Jam was next and it was all over. I was amazed at the harmony and the fact that they were rockin' but showing extreme musical saavy. They found the "train". And then there is the band intro after the bass solo! Every note Duane played was heart wrenching- and still is today. It moves me to tears at times. Ever since then I've grossly neglected the rest of my CD collection and listened primarily to pre 10/29/71 bootlegs.I probably will for many years to come!

 
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  posted on 2/23/2002 at 07:02 AM
Mellisa...
 

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  posted on 2/25/2002 at 03:18 PM
I was just thinking that I should be in a thread about what drew me back to the abb. I've given up on these guys as much I have my golf game every time I go out. But I keep coming back.

 

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  posted on 2/26/2002 at 06:24 AM
I was hooked right from the opening notes of Statesboro Blues. The rest of The Fillmore East album made me a fan for life. Incredible how Duanes legacy has survived with so many contenders to his throne
 
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  posted on 2/26/2002 at 07:06 PM
Wow. I remember buying the 1st album when it came out. I took it back to the dorm at FSU, and telling my buddies "you gotta hear this". I'd been reading press in the Florida papers about the Brothers for awhile. And there it was. It was the " passion" that got to me, I think. Being a Spencer Davis fan, I loved it right from the get-go. And Dreams. I never get tired of hearing it, even after 30 plus years. And then it kept getting better, first with Idlewild South, and all those great songs and playing, and then the Fillmore album. My God, I'd never heard anything like it. This music just heals me to this day.
 
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  posted on 3/3/2002 at 09:31 AM
In 1969 a good friend of mine (we're both guitar players) came up to me and said "I've just heard the best guitar player I've ever heard. You've got to check out this band." Shortly thereafter I got the first LP and I was hooked. I still listen to the Fillmore Concerts disc on a very regular basis, and I still get the same feeling that I did the first time I heard it. 30 someodd years later I still get 'chickenskin' listening to that performance.
Bro. Duane has always been my favorite guitarist and has inspireded me more than any other musician.

 
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