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Author: Subject: Warren Haynes on the Confederate Flag: ‘You Don’t Need a Symbol to Be Proud of Who You Are’

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  posted on 7/8/2015 at 03:28 PM
http://radio.com/2015/07/06/warren-haynes-confederate-flag-interview/

Warren Haynes on the Confederate Flag: ‘You Don’t Need a Symbol to Be Proud of Who You Are’

"It's all about: healing, rising above and learning from the past, not making the same mistakes twice."
July 6, 2015 11:36 AM

By Brian Ives

Today (July 6) South Carolina’s General Assembly meets to discuss what to do with the rebel flag that has flown over some part of the Statehouse for more than 50 years. It promises to be an emotional debate, and several other states that utilize some iteration of the Confederate flag will surely be paying attention.

Emotions on both sides of this debate run high. Those in favor of the flag feel that it does not represent any kind of racism, that instead it symbolizes Southern pride. Those against the flag obviously disagree vehemently. This past week there were clashes in South Carolina between protesters on both sides of the argument.

Last week, Radio.com spoke to Warren Haynes, a former member of the Allman Brothers Band and a native of North Carolina, which took down the Confederate flag from its own state Capitol building in 2013.

Haynes doesn’t hesitate when asked his take on the flag.

“I’ve been in favor for a long time of getting rid of any public display of the rebel flag,” Haynes tells Radio.com.

He does admit, though, that “there are still a lot of people who only associate it with positive thoughts, and the South, and Southern music.”

In fact, that perception extends outside of the borders of the United States of America. “We used to tour a lot in Europe, and when we played there, there’d be people flying rebel flags, and they’d be doing it to honor the music. But that’s not what it’s about.”

He continues: “When I look back and think that there were a lot of bands flying the flag in the old days, I guess we were just much more naive at that point, and didn’t realize how it is interpreted by the people who are offended. And that’s really what it’s all about. I’m a Southerner, I can’t tell you how long I’ve thought it was offensive.”

Recently, Haynes says, he was questioned about the debate during an overseas trip.

“I just spent a month in Europe, and in Germany people were asking about this,” he says. “[That type of symbolism] is a more magnified issue there, as you can imagine.” In Germany, for instance, it is illegal to show a swastika in public.

“But you don’t choose your family; you rise above,” Haynes continues. “And that’s what it’s all about: healing, rising above and learning from the past, not making the same mistakes twice.I’m really proud of what’s happening right now, like in Alabama, getting rid of the flag. One by one, the states are all starting to step up.”

He also notes a bit of historical context about the use of the flag in the South; the Confederate symbol was pretty much dormant until the late 1950s.

“The fact is, that flag didn’t start flying again at the end of the Civil War,” he says. “It started flying again towards the beginning of the Civil Rights movement as a way of showing defiance towards the Civil Rights movement. We need to be clear about the origin of flying that flag, when it happened and why it happened.”

And what of those in the South who feel the need to display pride in their southernness? “Be proud of who you are,” Haynes says. “You don’t need a symbol to be proud of who you are.”

 

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  posted on 7/8/2015 at 04:59 PM
As always Warren hits it right on the nuggets!!!

 

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  posted on 7/8/2015 at 05:12 PM
Warren Haynes is a righteous man and may God bless him for being so damn cool.
 
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  posted on 7/8/2015 at 05:25 PM
Incredibly insightful and mature response from Warren.

Wouldn't expect anything different from the man.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 12:26 AM
When the people at the Emanuel African Methodist Church demonstrated such love, class, restraint, and propriety in the aftermath of that horrible disaster, my first inclination was to return the gesture by removing the flag. However, when out of state organizers started camping out and demonstrating in front of my state capitol to pressure us into removing the flag, well that just made me want to fly the damned flag and say "Hell, no!" to those folks. We South Carolinians are well capable of managing our own affairs and don't need smug bastards in the national media or community organizers who don't even live here putting a gun to our heads to make that decision.

So fine, Warren Haynes, if symbols mean nothing to you then why do you have an emblem for Gov't Mule and why did you wear that little mushroom symbol of the ABB? Were those symbols of organizations that you were proud to be associated with? If I were offended by those symbols would you be willing to set them aside? Certainly don't display peace signs or X's. Whatever you cherish as part of your past, put it away if you want to.

No matter what you do or don't do or say or don't say, certain people are going to be upset. What's that you people seem to prize so dearly.....TOLERANCE???? Well, then be tolerant, damn it. Wiping out other peoples cherished symbols does not show love, compassion, respect. It molifies some people and angers others. That is political correctness. It's ok to destroy a symbol if it's one that you dislike. Well, that ain't showing love, respect, and empathy for other viewpoints. Tolerance does that and let me tell you, if you can't tolerate someone else's cherished symbol then you are not a tolerant person. If you want to deny someone else's freedom of speech by denying him/her to display it, I dare say you are a vindictive and intolerant person. It's amazing I'd have to point that out.

I'm a South Carolinian. I make no apologies for the Confederate flag. It is flying on a Confederate memorial which is an appropriate place to fly it. It is part of our history for better or worse. It represents the good and the bad of the South.

I was hiking on a trail which we've developed on the old SC Railroad system which goes across the entire State and came to a walking bridge which crossed over a creek. Down below in the water are the remnants of the old railroad tressel which the confederate soldiers had to destroy in order to try to protect their families and property from the wholesale slaughter and destruction of General Sherman who marched across this State, looting homes and businesses and raping and molesting women and children the whole way. As I stared at the old tressel in the water I could only imagine the fear and desperation of those soldiers trying to protect their families and their property from that savage cruelty. Trust me, we paid for our transgressions right then and there and in the whole reconstruction period. That flag represents that period, too. It represents the carpetbaggers who came in and took advantage of our plight and stole our property for pennies on the dollar. It represents our recovery and the resolve of the people to overcome the utter destruction that took place down here. I am deeply proud of my southern heritage. I'm proud of my family who lived through this atrocity. I am proud of the sharecropper families who rose above their meager circumstances and have become well educated and successful professional neighbors and friends. If the Confederate flag doesn't represent this then what does?

I dearly love my beautiful State, the South, being a Southerner, and the glorious Confederate Flag which represents our region better than any other symbol. The negative connotations which outsiders assign to the flag are totally irrelevant to me. We live in a country with freedom of speech, do we not? What is the problem with that? I could not possibly care less what flag you fly in your home state. Let the duly elected officials of my State decide what is right for us.




[Edited on 7/9/2015 by wearly89]

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 06:01 AM
Well said wearly89, well said !

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 06:26 AM
I'm from the south and have lived here all my life, but I just don't understand why the confederate flag is such a big deal to some people down here. I'll admit my ignorance as to why there is so much pride in that flag. It's something that I'll likely never understand.

I respectfully disagree with the notion that flag represents our region better than any other symbol. To many even in the south it represents a region that never moved on or moved forward.

I will say all of the people trying to ban the flag has cause the exact opposite reaction than what they wanted by people who are supporters. Now you can't drive to the store without seeing it flying in someone's yard or on a car. Sometimes you can see a brand new flag that has possibly the same value as the car it is flying on.

I do grow tired of the phrase "heritage not hate". I know for some it is accurate and that's fine, but for some it is a crutch that they have leaned on for generations to justify waiving it in the face of those who are offended by it. A big part of the heritage of that flag seems to be built in the hatred of those who opposed the civil rights movement.

However to tie it back to music, I also don't care for what most call southern rock which that flag seems to be the banner most associated with that genre.

Check out Hootie & The Blowfish's song "Drowning" from Cracked Rear View. They were singing about the flag by the capital in SC 20 years ago.

[Edited on 7/9/2015 by WarEagleRK]

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 06:54 AM
Well, the legislators of SC have spoken and it is coming down.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 07:17 AM
Seems to me Wearly89 you are letting those "outside agitators" influence you when your first inclination was to take the flag down for those po' black folk slaughtered at church. Nice gesture on your part. Always go with your initial gut feeling ... haven't you ever heard that old saying?
As far as flags and symbols go, the three or four mule mandala that represents Gov't Mule pretty much stands for good music. The battle flag of the Confederacy represents the South seceding from the union and willing to lose life in defense of the institution of slavery ... Period. If you were black, we wouldn't be having this conversation. Of course if you could only show those pesky African Americans that train treastle then they would realize we've been absolved for bringing their ancestors over here against their will and forced to work. The rebel flag doesn't represent the New South or reconstruction for that matter - the atrocities of which have more to do with the assination of Lincoln than losing the war. And Warren is actually right concerning the rebel flag at least in South Carolina. It was placed atop the capital to supposedly honor the hundredth anniversary of the Civil War. The fact that it wasn't taken down would in fact suggest that it had more to do as in opposition to the Civil Rights movement of the 60's.
I have no problem with folks digging their history and heritage if they've got it right. The rebel flag certainly doesn't represent the ABB. As one of the first integrated rock bands in the U.S. (Not just the South), it stood for what they were fighting against. My ancestors are from South Carolina. My great,great grandfather Anderson Charles was with Lee when we surrendered. So I suppose that gives me the right to proudly fly the Confederate Flag; however, I play a little music and if Buddy Guy, Stevie Wonder, or any of the many black musicians that I admire would want to jam, I'd hate for them to think I was racist.
Oh by the way Nikki Haley said, "The flag has got to go." Last time I checked she was the duly elected ... Republican ... Governor of SC.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 08:11 AM
JMO but personally I feel that private citizens should have the right to fly the stars and bars if they so chose no matter what their reasons to do so are. I am not a supporter of the KKK by any means but I do respect their right to non violently voice their opinions as this is the freedom we have here in the United States.

That being said I do not think it is appropriate for the flag to be flown over public buildings anywhere in the U.S. because of the negative connotation it has related to slavery and the denial of civil rights here in the U.S. especially in the South in the past.

My wife an I watched the movie "Selma" last night some of the scenes showing the flag really drove home the use of the Stars and Bars by some Southerners back in the mid 60's as a symbol of racism and hate. I realize that not all southerners display the flag for this reason today but I think people need to be aware what it symbolizes today to the majority of the general public and African Americans in general.

http://www.mysanantonio.com/news/local/history-culture/article/Unseen-photo s-from-Selma-march-revealed-in-new-UT-6087774.php#photo-7543310

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 08:23 AM
Regarding the use of the Stars and Bars by some of the bands from the south I am currently reading a very good book by Gene Odom titled "Lynyrd Skynyrd: Remembering the Free Birds of Southern Rock". In the book he mentions that MCA was looking for a marketing hook for the band and had them start using the Stars and Bars in their sets and on album covers etc. According to Odom that band did not place any special significance in the flag and went along with MCA on it.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 08:36 AM
maybe I should have put this over in the whipping post in the thread already started there on this topic, but because it was from warren I thought it was generally worthy to post here.

I think that the government (state or federal) have no good reason to promote this flag. private citizens can do whatever they want.

Have a wonderful day

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 09:11 AM
quote:


I think that the government (state or federal) have no good reason to promote this flag. private citizens can do whatever they want.




I agree with you on that and as far as I can tell nobody is stopping private citizens from having them.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 09:28 AM
Well, Wearly and WarEagle, not everyone agrees with you two. Glad you express your opinions. I say take that flag down and stow it. It represented something different then. It now represents something ugly to many. Have one at your houses, thatis great. Fly it at your house, great. Public places? Take the thing down. The war is over.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 09:49 AM
Where will the political correctness end?

We've already seen high school names change, how about names of cities or counties?

Impossible you say? I hope so, this is not encouraging:

http://www.nbc-2.com/story/29505204/ordinance-protects-gen-lees-portrait-fo rm-removal#.VZ6JOflViko

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 10:10 AM
quote:
Seems to me Wearly89 you are letting those "outside agitators" influence you when your first inclination was to take the flag down for those po' black folk slaughtered at church. Nice gesture on your part. Always go with your initial gut feeling ... haven't you ever heard that old saying?


Bottom line - without those outside agitators South Carolina would still be flying that flag.

quote:
No matter what you do or don't do or say or don't say, certain people are going to be upset. What's that you people seem to prize so dearly.....TOLERANCE???? Well, then be tolerant, damn it. Wiping out other peoples cherished symbols does not show love, compassion, respect. It molifies some people and angers others. That is political correctness. It's ok to destroy a symbol if it's one that you dislike. Well, that ain't showing love, respect, and empathy for other viewpoints. Tolerance does that and let me tell you, if you can't tolerate someone else's cherished symbol then you are not a tolerant person. If you want to deny someone else's freedom of speech by denying him/her to display it, I dare say you are a vindictive and intolerant person. It's amazing I'd have to point that out.


So, to you, despicable racism should be tolerated? The flag was put up in South Carolina as a direct "screw you" to the Civil Rights Act. I won't tolerate hatred, bigotry and racism.

You know wearly89- you should always be careful when saying "you people". If you are lumping a lot of folks into one group there is a good chance you are exhibiting prejudice. I don't belong to any group. I'm an individual just like all the rest of the people on the planet.

Regarding your diatribe I call BS. South Carolina would not have done crap without "outside agitators."

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 10:19 AM
quote:
Regarding your diatribe I call BS. South Carolina would not have done crap without "outside agitators."


Funny but the phrase "outside agitators" was the term then Alabama Governor George Wallace and the other racists used in the movie Selma I watched last night.

If it were not for "outside agitators" putting a spotlight on Alabama making it impossible for blacks to register to vote back in the mid 60's who knows if the "Civil Rights Act of 1964" would ever been passed.

It was "outside agitators' like MLK who forced Lyndon Johnson to stop dragging his feet to act and ram that bill through Congress.

[Edited on 7/9/2015 by Bill_Graham]

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 10:42 AM
quote:
Well, Wearly and WarEagle, not everyone agrees with you two. Glad you express your opinions. I say take that flag down and stow it. It represented something different then. It now represents something ugly to many. Have one at your houses, thatis great. Fly it at your house, great. Public places? Take the thing down. The war is over.


Just to avoid any confusion (because this at least read to me like you thought I was supporting it) I personally hate that flag and don't understand why it is held so dearly by so many.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 11:09 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/09/magazine/the-souths-heritage-is-so-much-m ore-than-a-flag.html?_r=0

The South’s Heritage Is So Much More Than a Flag

By PATTERSON HOOD
JULY 9, 2015

First off, I love the Southland.

I was born and raised in Florence, Ala., a small town on the northern banks of the Tennessee River in a region known locally as the Shoals. It’s a Bible Belt community; my hometown was “dry” until I was nearly 20 years old. It was also the birthplace of some of the most beloved and important music of the 20th century.

W.C. Handy, sometimes known as the father of the blues and an important early jazz figure — the author of “Beale Street Blues” and “St. Louis Blues,” among other early standards — was born in Florence in 1873. The radical and ingenious producer Sam Phillips was born half a century later in McGee Town, a small farming community about eight miles to the northwest, two farms over from my family’s homestead. He nurtured the invention of rock ’n’ roll, discovering Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Howlin’ Wolf, Charlie Rich, Ike Turner, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, among many others.

On the south side of the river, the neighboring towns of Muscle Shoals and Sheffield hosted recording studios — FAME Studios and Muscle Shoals Sound Studios, respectively — that along with Stax Records’ studio in Memphis became the epicenter of the soul and R&B explosion of the late ’60s and early ’70s. Aretha Franklin, Wilson Pickett, Percy Sledge, the Staple Singers, Bobby Womack and many other African-American artists crossed racial barriers and recorded classic music with the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section, who happened to be white. Together, they recorded landmark hits that were the soundtrack of the Civil Rights Movement.

The four towns that make up the Shoals are deeply religious and politically conservative, but they also hosted a bubbling underground of progressive thought, home to a vibrant minority of freethinkers and idealists. In our own mythology, we weren’t caught up in the bloody violence that will forever haunt the reputations of Birmingham, Memphis and Selma — we were too busy making joyous music. The elementary school I attended had already been integrated (peacefully, as far as I know) by 1970, when I started first grade. I never saw a burning cross or a burning church. That said, I’m sure there has been plenty of frothing at the mouth there recently over last month’s Supreme Court decisions, President Obama’s eulogy for Clementa Pinckney at Charleston’s Emanuel A.M.E. Church, the rainbow lights at the White House — and of course, the Confederate flag.

When I was growing up, I never thought much about the flag. My father, David Hood, was and still is a session bass player with the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section. His views on the Civil Rights era were shaped by the time he spent playing with Aretha and the Staple Singers. He looked at George Wallace and Bull Connor with great disdain, and was mortified to think that people around the world believed all Southerners were like that.

My father worked long hours at the studio, and I spent a large part of my childhood with my grandparents and great-uncle. Raised during the Great Depression, they were progressive by the standards of their generation and told me stories about Franklin Delano Roosevelt, who the old folks said had saved Florence and the surrounding towns; and Wilson Dam, a World War I-era structure that crossed the Tennessee River just east of Florence, made the river navigable and provided the impetus for Roosevelt’s Tennessee Valley Authority, which electrified the region and brought it — sometimes kicking and screaming — into the 20th century. They also told stories about my great-great-grandfather, who fought for the Confederacy at Shiloh during the Civil War. They were always quick to say that he had been poor and never owned slaves, and had simply fought against a conquering army invading his home.

Such is the storytelling that pervades the Southern character. The South loves myths and legends, and while they may have roots in the truth, they often overlook certain complexities. We raise our children steeped in “Gone With the Wind” folklore and pretend that all the things we saw in “12 Years a Slave” didn’t happen.

As a songwriter, I’ve spent the better part of my career trying to capture both the Southern storytelling tradition and the details the tall tales left out, putting this dialectical narrative into the context of rock songs. My band’s best-known work, an album we recorded a decade and a half ago called “Southern Rock Opera,” is an examination of life in the South after the Civil Rights era, in the form of a coming-of-age tale of a Southern boy about my age who grows up to become a famous musician before dying in a plane crash while on tour. The album wrestled with how to be proud of where we came from while acknowledging and condemning the worst parts of our region’s history.

When Drive-By Truckers were recording “Southern Rock Opera,” we were very concerned about how the record would be received. We wanted to back up everything we said with documented facts, lest we be construed as apologists — lest someone not notice that a sympathetic song about George Wallace was written from the Devil’s point of view. And we made a conscious decision not to discuss the so-called rebel flag. We didn’t want our narrative getting bogged down in a debate about an antiquated symbol, one we considered a moot point in any case. My own coming-of-age story revolved around much more important things like going to rock concerts and trying to get a date or hanging out with friends on weekends. The flag might have been a backdrop at Lynyrd Skynyrd concerts, but beyond that it wasn’t really anything any of us thought much about at the time.

It was only later, when we started playing songs from the album at shows, that we noticed that fans were bringing rebel flags and waving them during a song called “The Southern Thing.” The song was written to express the contradictions of Southern identity:

Ain’t about no foolish pride, ain’t about no flag
Hate’s the only thing that my truck would want to drag
You think I’m dumb, maybe not too bright
You wonder how I sleep at night
Proud of the glory, stare down the shame
Duality of the Southern Thing.

Instead, people were treating it as a rallying cry. I’m still grappling with how easily it was misinterpreted — and we rarely play it today for that reason.

It was around that time that I began paying attention to the flag flying at courthouses and state capitals. I started hearing things like “heritage, not hate” from people who were perhaps well-meaning, but were nevertheless ignoring the fact that their beloved Southern Cross flew at Klan rallies — that it was a symbol for a war fought on the principle of one man owning another. Let’s pause to think about that one for a moment: one man owning another. When our kindly Grandpa says “states’ rights,” that’s the “right” he’s talking about. Unfair tariffs? Many of the soldiers in the Civil War probably couldn’t spell “tariff.” But they certainly knew that the South’s economy and very way of life was built upon the backs of men, women and children of color.

Last month, a terrorist with a gun killed nine unarmed men and women in a church in Charleston and woke the people in our country up from sweet dreams of a postracial America, driving home just how far we still have to go. As the city mourned and tried to make sense of its grief, the State House of South Carolina still flew the rebel flag at full staff. Now the tide is turning; the state’s legislature voted to take it down from the Capitol grounds early Thursday morning, and it’s not impossible to think that other Southern states might do the same before long.

It’s high time that a symbol so divisive be removed. The flags coming down symbolize the extent to which those who cry “heritage, not hate” have already lost their argument. Why would we want to fly a symbol that has been used by the K.K.K. and terrorists like Dylann Roof? Why would a people steeped in the teachings of Jesus Christ and the Bible want to rally around a flag that so many associate with hatred and violence? Why fly a flag that stands for the very things we as Southerners have worked so hard to move beyond?

If we want to truly honor our Southern forefathers, we should do it by moving on from the symbols and prejudices of their time and building on the diversity, the art and the literary traditions we’ve inherited from them. It’s time to study and learn about who we are and where we came from while finding a way forward without the baggage of our ancestors’ fears and superstitions. It’s time to quit rallying around a flag that divides. And it is time for the South to — dare I say it? — rise up and show our nation what a beautiful place our region is, and what more it could become.


Patterson Hood is a writer and musician. His band, Drive-By Truckers, has a new live album recorded at the Fillmore in San Francisco set to be released this fall.

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 11:55 AM
quote:
Seems to me Wearly89 you are letting those "outside agitators" influence you when your first inclination was to take the flag down for those po' black folk slaughtered at church. Nice gesture on your part. Always go with your initial gut feeling ... haven't you ever heard that old saying?
As far as flags and symbols go, the three or four mule mandala that represents Gov't Mule pretty much stands for good music. The battle flag of the Confederacy represents the South seceding from the union and willing to lose life in defense of the institution of slavery ... Period. If you were black, we wouldn't be having this conversation. Of course if you could only show those pesky African Americans that train treastle then they would realize we've been absolved for bringing their ancestors over here against their will and forced to work. The rebel flag doesn't represent the New South or reconstruction for that matter - the atrocities of which have more to do with the assination of Lincoln than losing the war. And Warren is actually right concerning the rebel flag at least in South Carolina. It was placed atop the capital to supposedly honor the hundredth anniversary of the Civil War. The fact that it wasn't taken down would in fact suggest that it had more to do as in opposition to the Civil Rights movement of the 60's.
I have no problem with folks digging their history and heritage if they've got it right. The rebel flag certainly doesn't represent the ABB. As one of the first integrated rock bands in the U.S. (Not just the South), it stood for what they were fighting against. My ancestors are from South Carolina. My great,great grandfather Anderson Charles was with Lee when we surrendered. So I suppose that gives me the right to proudly fly the Confederate Flag; however, I play a little music and if Buddy Guy, Stevie Wonder, or any of the many black musicians that I admire would want to jam, I'd hate for them to think I was racist.
Oh by the way Nikki Haley said, "The flag has got to go." Last time I checked she was the duly elected ... Republican ... Governor of SC.


I had a feeling there would be at least one contemptible jerk who would try play the race card on me when in fact, there is not a single allusion to race in my expressed point of view. Your interpretation of history is nothing more than a very biased point of view...one which excludes mine, to which I am very entitled.

You are so ignorant of the views of many people in the South of all persuations and yet you claim to think you know how I and others ought to think and feel on this issue. That about says it all for you - hateful, disrespectful, and intolerant of the views of many. Feel good about yourself?

And for everyone else here, I am fine with the decision of my Legislature and Governor. I'm for the will of the people, but I think all views should be respected as long as they do no harm.

 

Peach Master



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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 12:15 PM
quote:
quote:


Bottom line - without those outside agitators South Carolina would still be flying that flag.
quote:


Not true. Our Governor had already called for the flag to be removed and several of our Legislators were already moving toward that end before the protests. Furthermore, if they had decided not to remove the flag, that is an issue for the people of this state to deal with.



"So, to you, despicable racism should be tolerated? The flag was put up in South Carolina as a direct "screw you" to the Civil Rights Act. I won't tolerate hatred, bigotry and racism."

Nowhere did I say any of the crap you assigned to me, therefore, I'd have to say that you are a very intolerant and hateful person if you are trying to call me a racist, which I am not. I cited plenty of reasons why I love the Confederate flag. Am I to suppose that you think the US flag only represents one point of view that happens to coincide with your narrow minded and exclusionary thinking?

"You know wearly89- you should always be careful when saying "you people". If you are lumping a lot of folks into one group there is a good chance you are exhibiting prejudice. I don't belong to any group. I'm an individual just like all the rest of the people on the planet.

Regarding your diatribe I call BS. South Carolina would not have done crap without "outside agitators."
"


Excuse me, you are correct about my use of "you people". I should have simply referred to people like you as "giant gaping rectal crevices". There are plenty of other very fine people here who disagree with me but were respectful and tolerant. Thanks to those folks.

[Edited on 7/9/2015 by wearly89]

[Edited on 7/9/2015 by wearly89]

 

True Peach



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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 12:27 PM


[Edited on 7/9/2015 by Rusty]

 

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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 12:49 PM
Contemptible jerk? You ran your rebel flag up and I shot it full of holes. I'm not ignorant of the views of many folk here in the South or elsewhere, but i am intolerant of ignorant views, diatribes, etc. I'm against ignorance in general. The New South is about truth and enlightenment. The rebel flag is a rhorrible symbol to an ever increasing number of people. Both the rebel flag and the swashtika are symbols the klan still uses to this day. You are entitled to your opinion and if you want to fly the flag, fly it! Wrap yourself in it. Tattoo it on your forehead for everyone to see. And by God be proud. But any government building in the USA shouldn't have the rebel flag on it. I commend Gov. Haley and the SC Legislature for their decision to remove it. It is a shame that 9 people had to die in a place of worship by some idiot whose mind was poisoned by truly hateful, intolerant, and ignorant points of view for this to finally occur.

[Edited on 7/9/2015 by Charlesinator]

[Edited on 7/9/2015 by Charlesinator]

 

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Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 01:01 PM
Well that escalated quickly.
 

Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 7/9/2015 at 01:12 PM
quote:
quote:
Well, Wearly and WarEagle, not everyone agrees with you two. Glad you express your opinions. I say take that flag down and stow it. It represented something different then. It now represents something ugly to many. Have one at your houses, thatis great. Fly it at your house, great. Public places? Take the thing down. The war is over.


Just to avoid any confusion (because this at least read to me like you thought I was supporting it) I personally hate that flag and don't understand why it is held so dearly by so many.


bended knee apology, bad speed reading is poor excuse. read your initial post and see your slant and agree! yikes, my bad. typing on 1/4 cup of coffee early will never happen again! Again, the ignorant fool apologizes sir!

 

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