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Author: Subject: Ebola

World Class Peach



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  posted on 10/14/2014 at 08:33 PM
this seems a little closer to my predictions....... no wait it doesn't. i still think this is high. i'd say around 5-7k a week in january.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/14/world/europe/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp _t1

Ebola cases could soar to 10,000 a week; CDC: New team to help hospitals
By Catherine E. Shoichet, Laura Smith-Spark and Laura Perez Maestro, CNN
updated 8:51 PM EDT, Tue October 14, 2014

Madrid (CNN) -- It's an ominous number.
There could be up to 10,000 new Ebola cases per week in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone by the end of this year as the outbreak spreads, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday.

And now that a nurse has become the first person to contract Ebola on American soil, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it has a new plan to help hospitals handle the deadly virus.

"For any hospital anywhere in the country that has a confirmed case of Ebola, we will put a team on the ground within hours," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden told reporters.

The response team will include experts in infection control, protective equipment and experimental therapies. A team such as that, Frieden said, may have prevented a Dallas nurse from contracting the disease. The nurse was a member of the medical team that treated an Ebola patient who died last week.

"I wish we had put a team like this on the ground the day the first patient was diagnosed. That might have prevented this infection," Frieden said. "But we will do that from this day onward with any case anywhere in the U.S."

In addition to the many experts it sent to Dallas, Frieden said, the CDC "could have sent a more robust hospital infection control team and been more hands-on with the hospital from day one about exactly how this should be managed.

"Ebola is unfamiliar. It's scary," said Frieden. "And getting it right is really, really important, because the stakes are so high."

Speaking to reporters in Switzerland, WHO Assistant Director-General Dr. Bruce Aylward told reporters that the Ebola outbreak could get worse before it gets better.

Already, this outbreak has gotten deadlier. The mortality rate has increased from 50% to 70%, he said.
And by December, he said, there could be between 5,000 and 10,000 new cases weekly in West Africa.
Compare those December projections to the latest figures. As of Tuesday morning, there were a total of 8,914 Ebola cases and 4,447 deaths reported to the WHO, Aylward said.

"This has been a deadly disease ever since we discovered it in 1976," said Dr. Seema Yasmin, a staff writer at the Dallas Morning News and a former CDC disease detective.

"Certainly the death rate can be lowered if we don't have any delays in diagnosis and don't have any delays in treating people," Yasmin told CNN's Wolf Blitzer.

Aylward told reporters that in 90 days, officials have a goal they're aiming for: They want to see the number of cases dropping from week to week.

To start to decrease the rate of infection, the WHO says it hopes to isolate 70% of Ebola patients and have 70% of Ebola victim burials performed safely by December 1. Getting responders, facilities and plans in place to meet the goal will be very difficult, Aylward said.

Missing the goal will mean that more people will die than should have and that even more resources will be needed because the infection rate will continue to climb, he said.

Dallas nurse speaks out

Days after authorities announced that a Dallas nurse had contracted Ebola, concerns in the United States have focused on a key question: Are people who are putting themselves in harm's way to care for Ebola victims receiving the training and equipment they need?

"I've been hearing loud and clear from health-care workers from around the country that they're worried, that they don't feel prepared to take care of a patient with Ebola," Frieden said.

Every hospital in the United States needs to be prepared to handle Ebola, he said, adding that the CDC will be stepping up training efforts.

The Dallas nurse, Nina Pham, had cared for Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan, who contracted Ebola in Liberia and died of the illness at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

"A single infection in a healthcare worker is unacceptable," Frieden said. "And what we're doing at this point is looking at everything we can do to minimize that risk so those that are caring for her do that safely and effectively."

At least 76 health-care workers who may have come into contact with Duncan after he was hospitalized are now being monitored for symptoms of the disease, Frieden said.

At the Dallas hospital, teams from the CDC are taking a number of steps to improve safety in handling Ebola, Frieden said. The steps include ensuring there's a site manager making sure protective equipment is put on and taken off correctly, enhancing training and limiting the number of staff providing care, Frieden said.

Pham thanked supporters for sending kind wishes and prayers in a statement Tuesday, according to the Dallas hospital where she is being treated.

"I am blessed by the support of family and friends and am blessed to be cared for by the best team of doctors and nurses in the world," she said.

Infected nurse's assistant 'helping' as doctors treat her

Health authorities in Spain said that a nurse's assistant who is the first person to contract Ebola in Europe in the current outbreak is still in serious condition but doing better.

And even as Teresa Romero Ramos lies in a hospital bed, she's doing everything she can to take care of doctors, nurses and herself, said Dr. Marta Arsuaga, who is Romero's doctor and friend.

"She is helping us to treat her. ... She was where I am now, so she knows what I have to do," Arsuaga said.
Romero's case, like Pham's, has raised serious questions about how equipped hospitals are to cope with the Ebola outbreak.

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control said Monday that the Madrid hospital treating Romero doesn't meet all the standards set for centers capable of Ebola care.

And in a scathing letter, Javier Limon, Romero's husband, said she received only 30 minutes of training in putting on protective gear and called for the resignation of Madrid's regional health minister over how the case has been handled.

Romero helped care for one of two Spanish missionaries who were brought back to Madrid for treatment after being infected with the virus in West Africa. Both men died of the illness.

Besides treating Romero, Spanish authorities are monitoring 81 potential Ebola cases -- 15 in hospitals and 66 at home, according to the Spanish Ministry of Health. None of them is showing symptoms of Ebola, the ministry said.

Romero is stable but remains in serious condition, Antonio Andreu, director of the Carlos III Hospital in Madrid, said at a news conference.

A spokesman for a special committee created in Spain to keep people informed about Ebola told CNN that Spain will have a contagious diseases reference center in each of its regions.

Police, firefighters and ambulance personnel, as well as hospital staff, will be trained to deal with Ebola cases.
Andreu insisted that Spain's health care professionals have the situation under control. But he said more training will be given to health care workers and new guidelines will be prepared.

"Ebola is not a problem of Spain. It is not a problem of the United States," he said. "It's a global problem."

CNN's Laura Perez Maestro reported from Madrid, while Laura Smith-Spark wrote and reported from London and Catherine E. Shoichet wrote and reported from Atlanta. CNN's Alexander Felton, Claudia Otto, Elwyn Lopez and Jason Hanna contributed to this report.

[Edited on 10/15/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 10/15/2014 by LeglizHemp]

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 07:07 AM
http://www.aol.com/article/2014/10/15/second-dallas-health-care-worker-test s-positive-for-ebola/20978344/?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk2%2 6pLid%3D545879

Officials admit failures as a SECOND health care worker in Dallas tests positive for Ebola
Oct 15th 2014 4:56AM
By RYAN GORMAN

A second health care worker in Dallas has tested positive for Ebola, authorities announced.

The Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital employee was part of the team taking care of Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who was diagnosed with and died from the disease in Dallas.

The unidentified worker joins Nina Pham, a 26-year-old nurse whose condition is improving, officials said Tuesday, as the only two patients to contract the disease in the U.S.

The patient was admitted Tuesday and placed into isolation after self-reporting a fever and other associated symptoms, according to the Dallas Morning News. Potential contacts are already being identified.

"Health officials have interviewed the latest patient to quickly identify any contacts or potential exposures, and those people will be monitored," authorities said in a statement. "The type of monitoring depends on the nature of their interactions and the potential they were exposed to the virus."

A cleaning team similar to the one that cleaned the apartments of both Pham and Duncan's family was dispatched to sterilize the one lived in by this latest diagnosed patient, sources told the paper.

No further information is available, but a Wednesday morning press conference is expected to provide further details on the individual.

The diagnosis comes as CDC director Thomas Frieden admitted more precautions could have been taken to protect healthcare workers caring for Ebola patients.

The agency should have had "a more robust hospital infection control team" on the ground immediately after Duncan's diagnosis, Frieden said in a Tuesday afternoon press conference.

"I wish we had put a team like this on the ground the day the patient - the first patient - was diagnosed," he said. "We will do that from today onward with any case anywhere in the U.S."

Such a team was dispatched to Dallas this week, the agency previously announced, and will be deployed anywhere that Ebola is found.

"For any hospital anywhere in the country that has a confirmed case of Ebola, we will put a team on the ground within hours [with] some of the world's leading experts on how to take care of and protect health care workers from Ebola infection," said Frieden.

"I think we could, in retrospect, with 20-20 hindsight - we could have sent a more robust hospital infection control team and been more hands-on with the hospital from Day One about exactly how this should be managed," he admitted.

"Ebola is unfamiliar. It's scary, and getting it right is really, really important, because the stakes are so high."

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 08:55 AM
AGAIN - CLOSE THE BORDERS TO PEOPLE WHO HAVE TRAVELLED TO WEST AFRICA - SEND AS MUCH HELP/AID AS POSSIBLE. THE ADMINISTRATION IS BEING COMPLETELY IRRESPONSIBLE IN AN ATTEMPT TO BE PC. THIS SPREADS ALMOST AS EASILY AS THE FLU; 100 TIMES EASIER THAN AIDS AND IT IS DEADLIER.

ENOUGH IS ENOUGH.

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 09:48 AM
OMG, you put that in all caps. I am so scared about ebola now. What am I going to do, we are all DOOMED.
 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 10:16 AM
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.
#1 Why didn't they treat these cases in Nebraska? It's not near as populated and they are TRAINED to handle something like this.Hell no! Put em in Texas & cripple their economy.And as we all know.If Texas goes down ,we all do.And by all means keep those people with GOD only know's what(TB etc) comin across the border as well.It's in the cards to bring Texas down.Can't have them gun totin,hardcore patriots strong,organized and on the loose.
#2 Keep the flight's from Africa comin full force.LMFAO,,,,while the agents are there with their temp guns to check their temp before they board and exit.What a joke. Obama is determined to bring this nation to it's knees.
Ya still think all those plastic coffins and fema camps are conspiracy paranoia? And talk of Obama declaring martial law before he exit's the office is BS as well? If you do,,,there has been a new level of stupidity reached.

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 10:19 AM
quote:
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.
#1 Why didn't they treat these cases in Nebraska? It's not near as populated and they are TRAINED to handle something like this.Hell no! Put em in Texas & cripple their economy.And as we all know.If Texas goes down ,we all do.And by all means keep those people with GOD only know's what(TB etc) comin across the border as well.It's in the cards to bring Texas down.Can't have them gun totin,hardcore patriots strong,organized and on the loose.
#2 Keep the flight's from Africa comin full force.LMFAO,,,,while the agents are there with their temp guns to check their temp before they board and exit.What a joke. Obama is determined to bring this nation to it's knees.
Ya still think all those plastic coffins and fema camps are conspiracy paranoia? And talk of Obama declaring martial law before he exit's the office is BS as well? If you do,,,there has been a new level of stupidity reached.



No you brainless wonder I am not now an Obama fan nor did I vote for him. So hillbilly boy try again.

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 12:54 PM
Those caps were intentional. I was an Intern at St. Vincent's Hospital in the heart of Greenwich Village in 1981 - the first year of the AID's Epidemic; even before it had a name. We were terrified for ourselves; and once the route of transmission was identified breathed a little easier - but prayed it couldn't be transmitted through more casual contact. While this (Ebola) can't be spread as easily as the flu the fact that two workers got infected without a needle stick is scary as hell. Maybe we should send one of them to the White House and one to your house since it "is unlikely that it will spread." This is a global pandemic that could end up like the 1918 flu outbreak. This is not a trivial matter.
 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 01:01 PM
I realize that drug companies spend their research dollars on drugs that make money but seems to me if the Western Govt's of the world all chipped in to fund research they could come up with a cure? Why not another Manhattan Project to find a cure? While this disease seems to be limited, for now, to underdeveloped African countries it worries me that this threat is being underestimated by the Western World.
 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 01:03 PM
http://motherboard.vice.com/read/this-math-model-is-predicting-the-ebola-ou tbreak-with-incredible-accuracy

This Math Model Is Predicting the Ebola Outbreak with Incredible Accuracy
Written by
Michael Byrne
Editor
October 14, 2014 // 04:10 PM EST

Part of the allure of epidemiology is being able to describe and predict highly dynamic outbreaks with simple, clean mathematical models. But how close can models really get to perfectly mapping the spread of disease?

Modeling how disease spreads early in an outbreak is a major challenge as sample sizes remain low and variables high. But a recently-developed method of making short-term outbreak projections called the IDEA model has shown promise, and is even doing an excellent job of tracking the current Ebola outbreak.

"If validated, the implications of such a finding may be profound," wrote the model's creators in an open-access 2013 paper in PLOS One, "e.g., the ability to project, with a high degree of accuracy, the final size and duration of a seasonal influenza outbreak within 2 weeks of onset."



The graph above shows how the model is faring with the current Ebola outbreak. So far, it's nearly perfect. If the IDEA model continues to predict the epidemic with the same accuracy, we can expect Ebola to start burning out in December, with a total of 14,000 cases. Currently, according to the CDC there are or have been 8,400. We have a ways to go.

So how does the model work? A few weeks ago, we discussed the infamous r_0 number—which is used to calculate the transmissibility of a disease in terms of additional infections per infected individual—and a model known as SIR, which describes the powerful dynamics involved in mixing susceptible (S), infected (I), and immune (R, for recovered) segments of a population that's exposed to infection.

The SIR model is classically used to see how much an infection can grow within a population, with those susceptible becoming infected, and the infected sometimes becoming recovered or immune. (A good explainer example is this model of a potential zombie outbreak.) When combined with r_0, the models can give us the force of an infection.

Generally, epidemic models grow from the SIR framework, with each one adding a new "compartment." For example, the SEIR model adds an "E" for a population group that's been exposed, and is incubating the pathogen, but isn't yet infectious—such as when US Ebola patient zero Thomas Eric Duncan boarded his plane from Liberia in September.

The MSIR model adds "M," a group with natural, born-with-it immunity. Meanwhile, the SIS model actually removes the immune group entirely from the equations, a situation that fits the common cold and flu, in which being infected once offers no future protection.

There are several other variations on the basic compartmental model, but this is hardly the only modeling strategy out there. Both generally and as a way of informing the models above, we might turn to the IDEA model.

IDEA stands for "incidence decay and exponential adjustment." Yes, finally, we get to really talk about exponential things in the proper sense, rather than the usual casual redefinition of the term to mean "a lot."

One of the IDEA scheme's creators, Amy Greer, writes that the model is "based on the idea that we could use simple types of public health surveillance data and turn that information into reliably accurate projections of what might happen in the outbreak in the short-term."

The model attempts to make up for the usual shortcomings of the r_0 number, which, according to the IDEA creators, often fails to accurately account for epidemic control efforts.

As with the compartmental models, r_0 is at its best at the very beginning of an outbreak using sets of initial values. In an outbreak, things change fast, however, and public health responses can add a ton of variables to the mix.

Again, in the case of Ebola, how could a research have modeled the way misinformation and protests have undermined quarantine efforts? This is where IDEA is designed to be most effective.

If you remember, r_0 is technically defined as the average number of secondary infections that can be expected to result from one primary infection. In other words, this is how many people that each infected person can expect to transmit the disease to before they, the primary case, become not-infectious.

Ebola sits at around r_0 = 1.5 in the United States and closer to 2 in West Africa, where the disease has a higher chance of spreading. Keep in mind the 1.5 is an initial value and as more control measures are taken, it should decline.

Measuring the decline is where things get murky, according to Greer. Her model uses a new term d to modify r_0 like this:



The main thing here is the d, which is a factor representing some discount function that changes through time, so named because it resembles discounting in financial models. Here it's meant to represent the efforts taken to control the epidemic, vaccinations and quarantines etc. The larger d gets, the smaller the I result, which is the number of total infected individuals.

Using this first I, we can find out how I changes through time, given by this equation, where the Ret at time 0 is just r_0:



So, multiplying the R value at a given time, which is the Ret, by the first equation we got using d will tell us how many infected individuals we can expect at the next time interval (days, probably).

All that is to say that the IDEA model is a much more dynamic way to look at transmissibility as it's continuously being modified by the various control mechanisms we might put into place to limit the epidemic or, rather, the observed effects of them.

Algebraically twisting around the equations above, along with other equations in the model that predict changes in an epidemic's immune and susceptible populations, gives us some other useful predictions: The expected time an epidemic is likely to stop growing, an estimated maximum number of total infected individuals, and so on. The model can also give epidemiologists a way of determining how effective their control measures are.

Greer and her team tested the model out on data from an H1N1 outbreak in Nunavet, Canada (a reasonably isolated population). You can see the results below. Not bad: the models tracked the observed data pretty well. (Note that SI refers to how many different time intervals, the ts above, are calculated.)



In simulated epidemics, the researchers found that their model did very well with low or moderately low starting r_0 values, which SIR can have a difficult time with. According to Greer and her team, the IDEA prediction was a near-perfect fit.

"We found that best-fit projections for the IDEA model for disease dynamic systems with low or intermediate r_0 were exceedingly good, with parameters derived within 3–4 generations able to project the full extent of simulated epidemics with remarkable accuracy," the team concluded in their PLOS One paper

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 01:10 PM
There has been one case of ebola that came in from outside the usa. the other 2 cases stem from that one case for a variety of reasons. things are not out of control in the usa, nor is it anywhere close to being out of control. knee-jerk reactions to problems help no one. everyone remain calm, LOL.
 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 01:15 PM
Hillbilly boy! Been called a southern man,southern gentleman,free spirit,ol hippie,an honest man,a cool cat,the original ramblin man,buddy,as*hole,brother & a host of other coin's.But never hillbilly boy.
Might run that by Betts & catch his response.Most likely laugh his as* off.

Oh yeah! Lets don't forget racist & homophobic.But that's only been here in the end all/be all WP.So i really don't put much stock in or lose sleep over it.

[Edited on 10/15/2014 by LUKE]

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 06:02 PM
http://www.vice.com/read/ebola-isnt-a-medical-problem-883

EBOLA ISN'T A MEDICAL PROBLEM, IT'S A PEOPLE PROBLEM
By Martin Robbins Oct 14 2014

Medicine has a huge problem, and it’s this: A whole bunch of things exist that simply shouldn’t exist. For example, children in Western schools sick with the measles, or polio in Pakistan, which has seen more than 200 people affected this year alone. The latest and scariest is the large-scale Ebola epidemic still raging in Western Africa.

None of these things should be happening. We have mass immunization programs, and safe and effective vaccines for measles. The same goes for polio, which at one point looked unlikely to survive into the 21st century. Ebola cases are to be expected, but this isn’t a virus that’s really capable of world domination—there’s just no good reason why an epidemic on this scale should ever have happened.

But it did. So why?

In a word: people.

The spread of the Ebola virus in West Africa isn’t a medical problem so much as a social or a governmental problem. There may not be a proven cure for Ebola yet, but as I've written previously, the virus isn’t great at spreading in the first place. As long as you have a well-functioning health system, trained staff, antiseptic environments to work in, basic medical supplies, and a good set of procedures in place, any outbreak can be swiftly contained.
The trouble is, the parts of West Africa where this outbreak flared up have almost none of these things. In fact, you’d struggle to find a worse place for an outbreak to happen if you tried. The virus appeared on the border between Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea—countries ranked 163rd, 183rd, and 179th richest in the world by the IMF, out of 187. If that doesn’t mean anything to you, consider this: In 2006, recovering from a brutal civil war that destroyed most of its hospitals and clinics, Liberia had a grand total of roughly 50 doctors in the entire country. And now they’re dying of Ebola, too.

Aid agencies like Doctors Without Borders aren’t just pottering around offering help and blankets, they’re trying to act as a national health service on a budget of just a few tens of millions of dollars, and the job is basically impossible.

As if that weren’t bad enough, conspiracy theories abound. In August, a clinic in Liberia was attacked by an angry mob chanting, "There’s no Ebola!" echoing a widespread belief that the disease is a hoax. Last week, Newsweek reported that "in September, an article published in the Daily Observer, a major Liberian newspaper, called the Ebola virus a 'genetically modified organism' that was tested on Africans by aid agencies at the behest of the Western governments.”

Sound silly to you? It’s no worse than some of the theories being aired in the West. Rush Limbaugh suggested that Obama wants the virus to kill Americans as "revenge for slavery," while former public figure Chris Brown told his Twitter followers that the virus was a form of "population control."

The factors here are eerily similar to what we saw with polio in Nigeria. A vaccination drive working its way across Africa had left the continent almost polio-free by 2003, until medical staff met resistance in several northern states of Nigeria with large Muslim populations. Officials there had convinced themselves that the vaccine was part of a Western plot to spread AIDS and cancer, their fears not exactly eased by the growing war on terror. The attempt to eradicate the virus failed and Nigeria went on to become an exporter of the disease.

So are these people crazy? Well, think of it this way: Imagine you’re sitting in your living room and a group of doctors with strange accents and uniforms knock on your door and start waving a needle around. What do you do? Let them in and offer your arm up for a jab, or go and hide your kids under the bed? Exactly.

That’s before you even consider the history of West Africa. Sierra Leone, where health officials have admitted defeat in the face of the epidemic, has a past that’s basically a five-century catalogue of violence, rape, slavery, and oppression.

The other easy thing to blame is education: "If only that ignorant lot were better educated, they’d understand the error of their ways and accept the vaccine." This type of argument is called the "deficit model," a largely discredited theory that “attributes public scepticism or hostility to a lack of understanding, resulting from a lack of information."

The problem is, giving people more information hardly ever works. We’ve talked about this in this column before. Last year, the Royal Statistical Society ran a survey in which they found out that the British public is basically wrong about everything. Worse than that, even when they were given the correct answer to questions like, "How many immigrants are there?" they simply refused to believe it. In fact, as the MMR vaccine panic showed, more knowledge can even have the opposite effect: The parents who stopped their children from getting their shots during the scare of the late-90s and early-00s were more likely to be university-educated and to read up about the vaccine from a wide variety of sources.

In all of these cases—MMR, polio, Ebola—we’ve effectively reached the limit of what modern medicine can ever hope to achieve. You can create the most sophisticated medicines and vaccines in the universe, but none of that matters if most countries can’t afford them—or even afford to train doctors in the first place. (Or, of course, if parents refuse to allow their kids to take them.)

This isn’t a remote problem, either. You can set up all the screening programs you like, but sooner or later some of these plagues will make their way here. Diseases more contagious than Ebola (like malaria) used to be common on our shores and could easily return in my lifetime. Viruses and bacteria don’t really care about human borders. We’re all part of the same global system, and if we don’t work to eradicate these enemies abroad, we can’t be surprised when they eventually find us at home.

The panic in the West isn't proportional to the tiny threat the virus poses here. Still, it’s an important reminder that however well defended we think we are by our medicines, vaccines, antiseptics, and hazmat suits, we will never be safe until we deal with the failings of people. Ebola may not be the Big One, but the next disease could be.

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 06:35 PM
quote:
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.


Gosh LUKE - why are you blaming Obama? Isn't this really God's fault?

 

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  posted on 10/15/2014 at 10:27 PM
quote:
quote:
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.


Gosh LUKE - why are you blaming Obama? Isn't this really God's fault?
Ebola came from Africa,

Obama was born in Kenya.

Connect the dots.

 

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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 07:28 AM
So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!
 

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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 07:31 AM
quote:
So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!


There are reports the nurse checked with the CDC and they said, "sure - go ahead and fly. What could happen."

 

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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 08:34 AM
quote:
quote:
So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!


There are reports the nurse checked with the CDC and they said, "sure - go ahead and fly. What could happen."


And you wonder why people don't trust what the government tells us. JMO but I don't think the CDC or the U.S Heathcare system could manage an outbreak here in the U.S.

It is coming into Flu season here in the U.S. and I got my flu shot yesterday. So how are people going to know if they have the flu or ebola as the symptoms are similar at the beginning of the illnesses?

I am sure we all know people who will go to work no matter how sick they are so how do you control the spread of Ebola if this type of person goes to work and innocently spreads the disease?

I have no faith in our containment system here in the U.S.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 10:21 AM
Why couldn't Obama use his pen and phone and say, "Any person from West
Africa is prohibited from entering the United States, until further notice. Period."

Now it's too late. Why does he want to bring Ebola into this country?

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 10:37 AM
quote:
It is coming into Flu season here in the U.S. and I got my flu shot yesterday. So how are people going to know if they have the flu or ebola as the symptoms are similar at the beginning of the illnesses?


This is a potentially big problem. The amount of people who get the flu and then overwhelm hospital emergency rooms may slow our healthcare system to a crawl.


Anyone here ever read Stephen King's book The Stand?

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 10:46 AM
Whoa.

How did flu get on this thread? Wow, what a swerve! Amazing! Nobody can understand how flu got on this thread!

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 11:06 AM
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.

 

____________________

 

Peach Extraordinaire



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 11:12 AM
quote:
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.



Seriously? 2 people have been diagnosed with ebola in this country and Obama is minimizing it? 2 people?

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 11:40 AM
quote:
Why couldn't Obama use his pen and phone and say, "Any person from West
Africa is prohibited from entering the United States, until further notice. Period."

Now it's too late. Why does he want to bring Ebola into this country?


It is not too late to stop an epidemic; and re: the person below said its only two people.; I'd rather stop an epidemic than control it. Kind of like saying "only two trees are burning in So Cal. We have nothing to gain by not limiting travel to/from those countries and a lot potentially to lose.

 

Extreme Peach



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 12:25 PM
quote:
quote:
It is coming into Flu season here in the U.S. and I got my flu shot yesterday. So how are people going to know if they have the flu or ebola as the symptoms are similar at the beginning of the illnesses?


This is a potentially big problem. The amount of people who get the flu and then overwhelm hospital emergency rooms may slow our healthcare system to a crawl.


Anyone here ever read Stephen King's book The Stand?


My point is the early symptoms of ebola are similar to the flu so it is possible someone with ebola would not know they had it thinking it was just the flu and continue to interact with other people in the initial stages of the disease. This could lead to them spreading the virus. There are people I work with who pride themselves in never missing work no matter how sick they are.

I am also not convinced the CDC has adequate plan in place should this disease get out of control here in the U.S. and how many small local hospitals actually have the protocol to handle an outbreak effectively? I don't lay awake a night worrying about this but it is just a thought.

 

True Peach



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  posted on 10/16/2014 at 01:25 PM

 

____________________
I pledge and support the elimination of the derogatory use of the r-word from everyday speech and promote the acceptance and inclusion of people with intellectual disabilities. http://www.r-word.org/

 
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