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Author: Subject: Ebola

World Class Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2014 at 04:24 PM
pretty much all 3 countries have air travel shut down and borders closed as well as they can be closed. they have just done this in the last week because of the guy who flew to lagos and was on his way home to the USA. newspapers keep saying this guy was Liberian but he was a US citizen (just became citizen in the last year).

even with the 3-21 day incubation period it would still be difficult for this virus to spread significantly in the developed world. there is a very real possibility it can spread in the non-developed world though, especially africa.

edit

from the 1st post on june 23rd........There have been 567 cases and 350 deaths since the epidemic began in March

since then those numbers have doubled

[Edited on 7/30/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 7/30/2014 by LeglizHemp]

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2014 at 05:24 PM
Economic war maybe; but immigrants at Ellis Island were quarantined. This is getting to be like that move ?Contagion? a few years ago.

I was an intern at St. Vincent's Hospital (R.I.P) in the West Village in 1981 at the start of the aids epidemic. We were scared out of our minds since no one knew how you got the disease. This is scarier than that in some ways as it seems it is spread through less intimate contact

 

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  posted on 7/30/2014 at 05:34 PM
I can relate to that early 80's AIDS fear. I was down in the Village to pay a ticket in the early 80's. There were non-stop reports on the AIDS epidemic. I had to make a phone call and found a pay phone. While I was making the call I looked around and began noticing all kinds of sickly emaciated people. I remember distinctly wondering if I could catch the disease from the pay phone. There was a real hysteria in NYC in those days.

I've wondered if more reporting on this ebola epidemic might make matters worst.

 

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World Class Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2014 at 07:23 PM
http://www.vice.com/read/we-asked-an-expert-if-the-ebola-virus-will-kill-yo u-730

WE ASKED AN EXPERT IF THE EBOLA VIRUS WILL KILL YOU
By Matt Taylor Jul 30 2014

It's become a sort of annual ritual for Americans to go wild over the possibility that a new, lethal illness might spread from Africa or Southeast Asia to their own backyard. Ten years ago, SARS was coming for you, and more recently, the Avian (bird) flu had overzealous parents stocking up on post-apocalyptic goodies like powdered milk and canned foods.

The latest dire threat to humanity is actually an oldie: the Ebola Virus, which was first identified after a mysterious fever swept through Zaire (since rechristened the Democratic Republic of the Congo) in 1976. Richard Preston introduced the specter of Ebola to much of the western world with a 1992 New Yorker piece that he subsequently expanded into a best-selling non-fiction thriller, The Hot Zone. The book, in turn, inspired that goofy piece of 90s cinema, Outbreak—though I prefer Steven Soderbergh's 2011 film Contagion, which offers a somewhat less sensational take on the same theme.

Ebola sufferers will often bleed from their nose, eyes, and ears, in addition to a host of less bizarre symptoms like vomiting. The current outbreak is the largest in history, with about 700 people already dead in West African countries like Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. Adding to the drama this week was the death of Sierra Leone's top Ebola doctor, along with news that an American traveling to Nigeria got sick and died there. The United Kingdom and Hong Kong are now quarantining passengers from the region, and with reports emerging of aid workers evacuating the West African coast, this is starting to look more and more like a global problem.

To find out just how likely Ebola is to reach our neck of the woods, I called up Dr. Diane Griffin, chair of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. She did her best to talk me down from the ledge.

VICE: What does the Ebola virus look like?
Dr. Diane Griffin: People get very rapidly ill with vomiting, diarrhea, bleeding—it's a hemorrhagic [bloody] fever. I'm not sure that if you lined up a whole bunch of people with different diseases that you could necessarily pick it out. Nobody has been able to figure out how the first person got infected.

What's the mortality rate?
The strain currently causing the outbreak in West Africa is Ebola Zaire, one of the original strains. They vary somewhat in how deadly they are, but this one has about a 70 percent mortality rate.

Is the number of deaths tied to the state of medicine and infrastructure in the country where the virus breaks out, or not really?
We don't know that because all these outbreaks are in Africa. One of the original outbreaks was in a missionary hospital that employed Belgian nuns, and the only way the whole Western world knew about it is that the nuns got evacuated to Belgium. But they still died at the same rate once they got there. It's a good example of the Western world not knowing or caring until their own get involved.

How does Ebola spread?
In contrast to a lot of other infections we worry about, it requires really close contact between the infected person and the uninfected person. The origin for the virus is in bats, and it gets into the human population kind of by accident. It spreads through hospitals—any place where patients are being taken care of. And more importantly, and more difficult to control, is in villages and families who are taking care of sick patients. It spreads within these families, and I gather—I'm not on the frontlines, though I have worked in Africa—I can envision a lot of the problems people encounter with suspicion. Medical workers and health care personnel [in West Africa] are scared and don't come to work. That makes it harder to keep up all these barrier precautions—it's inhibiting to have to be in a gown and mask and gloves and change them all the time.

What makes this outbreak different?
It's very widespread—usually they're quite localized—and they've had a hard time controlling it. The only way to contain the virus is through the isolation of patients and a barrier mechanism for preventing people who've had contact with infected individuals from being exposed to bodily fluids. It's not really unusual for American doctors working in these areas to get infected, though that tends to be what gets it into the press outside of Africa.

Which is sort of perverse.
Right. There's hundreds of cases and this has been going on for months, but all of a sudden in the last two days [people have noticed] because of two things: Americans have been infected, but also this person that flew to Nigeria, so all of a sudden everybody that has an airport is worried. It could move that way to any place just like any other infectious agent. I've heard rumors that they're starting to screen people leaving the area to make sure sick people don't get on airplanes. So that would be a reasonable precaution those countries can take to prevent it from spreading further. And then countries that have planes coming from that region can also screen passengers getting off to identify anybody with a fever or any other kind of illness and rapidly quarantine and then at least determine whether they're infected or not.

Do you think medical personnel would respond the same way to an Ebola outbreak here?
I think there would be much less of a problem in the United States or many other countries where medical personnel have a better understanding both of the precautions that need to be taken and how one gets infected. But the healthcare workers in many of these rural areas are not highly trained, and when they see co-workers and family members and neighbors dying, you can understand that would be a frightening situation.

What kind of precautions are reasonable for people outside of West Africa—and Americans in particular—to be taking? Should they modify their travel plans?
I don't think so, because the random tourist or businessperson or whoever is not going to come into contact with people who are sick—although there have been cases in the cities, which has been one of the problems. If you're going over there to help out in a hospital, then hopefully you know what you're getting into.

It sounds like you're reluctant to press the panic button. Is that your professional ethics talking, or what?
If I were panicked I'd let you know. I just don't think there's any reason for that. There are reasons to pay attention. One of the problems is that West Africa has not really experienced Ebola before, whereas Uganda and a few other countriues have had multiple outbreaks and they're a little more schooled in these control measures.

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2014 at 07:25 PM
i did read a story that said in past ebola outbreaks a man caught it from a cell phone....i swear...i read that
 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 7/30/2014 at 08:18 PM
quote:
i did read a story that said in past ebola outbreaks a man caught it from a cell phone....i swear...i read that


http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/27/man-steals-ebola-patient-phone-get s-infected/

I guess crime does not pay

 

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  posted on 8/4/2014 at 08:12 AM
http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/658359-doctor-who-treated-ebola-patient-has -contracted-virus-nigeria.html

Doctor who treated Ebola patient has contracted virus - NigeriaPublish Date: Aug 04, 2014

ABUJA - Nigerian authorities said Monday that a doctor in Lagos who treated a Liberian victim of Ebola has contracted the virus, the second confirmed case in sub-Saharan Africa's largest city.

"This new case is one of the doctors who attended to the Liberian Ebola patient who died," said Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu.

The minister told journalists that 70 other people believed to have come into contact with the Liberian are being monitored, eight of whom have been placed in quarantine at a facility in Lagos.

Patrick Sawyer, who worked for Liberia's finance ministry, contracted the virus from his sister before travelling to Lagos for a meeting of west African officials.

He landed in Lagos on July 20 from Monrovia after switching planes in Togo's capital Lome.

He was visibly sick upon arrival and taken directly to the First Consultants hospital in the upmarket Lagos neighbourhood of Ikoyi. He died in quarantine on July 25.

The hospital was closed indefinitely last week.

The second confirmed case in Nigeria is the latest in the deadliest-ever Ebola outbreak, which has infected 1,440 people and left 826 dead. The other cases are spread across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

 

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  posted on 8/4/2014 at 09:14 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/04/health/experimental-ebola-serum/index.html?hp t=hp_t1

Secret serum likely saved Ebola patients
By Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Danielle Dellorto, CNN
updated 9:52 AM EDT, Mon August 4, 2014

(CNN) -- Three top secret, experimental vials stored at subzero temperatures were flown into Liberia last week in a last-ditch effort to save two American missionary workers who had contracted Ebola, according to a source familiar with details of the treatment.

On July 22, Dr. Kent Brantly woke up feeling feverish. Fearing the worst, Brantly immediately isolated himself. Nancy Writebol's symptoms started three days later. A rapid field blood test confirmed the infection in both of them after they had become ill with fever, vomiting and diarrhea.

It's believed both Brantly and Writebol, who worked with the aid organization Samaritan's Purse, contracted Ebola from another health care worker at their hospital in Liberia, although the official Centers for Disease Control and Prevention case investigation has yet to be released.

A representative from the National Institutes of Health contacted Samaritan's Purse in Liberia and offered the experimental treatment, known as ZMapp, for the two patients, according to the source.

The drug was developed by the biotech firm Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. The patients were told that this treatment had never been tried before in a human being but had shown promise in small experiments with monkeys.

According to company documents, four monkeys infected with Ebola survived after being given the therapy within 24 hours after infection. Two of four additional monkeys that started therapy within 48 hours after infection also survived. One monkey that was not treated died within five days of exposure to the virus.

Brantly and Writebol were aware of the risk of taking a new, little understood treatment; informed consent was obtained from both Americans, according to two sources familiar with the care of the missionary workers. In the monkeys, the experimental serum had been given within 48 hours of infection. Brantly didn't receive it until he'd been sick for nine days.

The medicine is a three-mouse monoclonal antibody, meaning that mice were exposed to fragments of the Ebola virus and then the antibodies generated within the mice's blood were harvested to create the medicine. It works by preventing the virus from entering and infecting new cells.

The Ebola virus causes viral hemorrhagic fever, which refers to a group of viruses that affect multiple organ systems in the body and are often accompanied by bleeding.

Early symptoms include sudden onset of fever, weakness, muscle pain, headaches and a sore throat. They later progress to vomiting, diarrhea, impaired kidney and liver function -- and sometimes internal and external bleeding.

Vials reach hospital in Liberia

The ZMapp vials reached the hospital in Liberia where Brantly and Writebol were being treated Thursday morning. Doctors were instructed to allow the vials to thaw naturally without any additional heat. It was expected that it would be eight to 10 hours before the medicine could be given, according to a source familiar with the process.

Brantly asked that Writebol be given the first dose because he was younger and he thought he had a better chance of fighting it, and she agreed. However, as the first vial was still thawing, Brantley's condition took a sudden turn for the worse.

Brantly began to deteriorate and developed labored breathing. He told his doctors, "I am going to die," according to a source with firsthand knowledge of the situation.

Knowing his dose was still frozen, Brantly asked if he could have Writebol's now-thawed medication. It was brought to his room and administered through an IV. Within an hour of receiving the medication, Brantly's condition was nearly reversed. His breathing improved; the rash over his trunk faded away. One of his doctors described the events as "miraculous."

By the next morning, Brantly was able to take a shower on his own before getting on a specially designed Gulfstream air ambulance jet to be evacuated to the United States.

Writebol also received a vial of the medication. Her response was not as remarkable, according to sources familiar with the treatment. However, doctors on Sunday administered Writebol a second dose of the medication, which resulted in significant improvement.

She was stable enough to be evacuated back to the United States and is expected to arrive before noon Tuesday.

ZMapp has not been approved for human use, and has not even gone through the clinical trial process, which is standard to prove the safety and efficacy of a medication. The process by which the medication was made available to Brantly and Writebol is highly unusual. It may have fallen under the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "compassionate use" regulation, which allows access to investigational drugs outside clinical trials.

Getting approval for compassionate use is often long and laborious, but in the case of Brantly and Writebol, they received the medication within seven to 10 days of their exposure to the Ebola virus.

On July 30, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, an arm of the military responsible for any chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosive threats, allotted additional funding to MAPP Biopharmaceutical due to "promising results."

 

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  posted on 8/4/2014 at 04:16 PM
I have my doubts about this report. i think might be the press trying to sell papers.

http://time.com/3080189/ebola-mt-sinai-new-york/

Man Tested for Ebola at New York City Hospital
Alexandra Sifferlin @acsifferlin Charlotte Alter @charlottealter 4:20 PM ET

The patient had recently travelled to a West African country

A man who arrived at Mount Sinai hospital in New York City Monday with a high fever and stomach problems is being tested for Ebola, a hospital spokesman confirmed.

The patient had been visiting a West African country where Ebola cases have been reported. Africa is in the midst of the worst Ebola outbreak in history, with over 1,600 reported cases and over 887 deaths in Nigeria, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.

The hospital reports that the patient is being kept in isolation to prevent the spread of the deadly virus, and is being tested to confirm that his symptoms are from Ebola.

“All necessary steps are being taken to ensure the safety of all patients, visitors and staff,” Mt. Sinai said in a statement.

If the patient does indeed have Ebola, the hospital is equipped to handle the disease, which only spreads by direct contact with bodily fluids like blood and saliva. “Any advanced hospital in the U.S., any hospital with an intensive care unit has the capacity to isolate patients,” CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden told reporters late last week.

The CDC has long assured Americans that even if there were to be a patient with Ebola in the United States (besides the two Americans with Ebola evacuated from West Africa), the risk for the disease spreading is minimal. “We are confident that we will not have significant spread of Ebola, even if we were to have a patient with Ebola here,” Frieden said. “We work actively to educate American health care workers on how to isolate patients and how to protect themselves against infection.”

Unlike many health care workers in Western Africa, health care workers in U.S. hospitals have the resources to to keep themselves adequately protected while treating patients.

 

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  posted on 8/4/2014 at 06:21 PM
quote:
quote:
Life sure is good in the good ol' USA.


All it takes is one infected person to walk through a crowded airport.
Try reading "Executive Orders" by Tom Clancy


But it's okay Jerry, we're always prepared. We still have all those caskets that we did not use from the Swine flu pandemic they were not allowed to unleash. Well okay, they were allowed to unleash it but with all the noise the media made about who was profiting and owned stocks in the vaccine companies, they decided to hold off on that. Would have been much worse than Enron, all those politicians profiting off the vaccines while Americans were dieing and being piled up in plastic coffins six deep.

Here in good ole NY they had an emergency 'what if' response drill for anthrax last week. Must be expecting a run of cows crossing the border from Mexico and coming up here on freight trains deciding to run wild thru the streets of NY.

 

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  posted on 8/4/2014 at 07:36 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/05/health/patient-at-mount-sinai-has-ebola-l ike-symptoms-hospital-says.html

Symptoms of 3 New York Patients Raise Concerns About Ebola
By DENISE GRADY and MARC SANTORAAUG. 4, 2014

Heightened concern about the Ebola virus has led to alarms being raised at three hospitals in New York. But so far, no Ebola cases have turned up.

The latest episode involved a man who had recently been to West Africa, and who went to the emergency room at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan late Sunday with a high fever and gastrointestinal problems, the hospital reported on Monday. He is being kept in isolation at the hospital while tests are being done for Ebola, a deadly disease, but also for other illnesses that could cause his symptoms.

But the city health department issued a statement on Monday saying that after consulting with Mount Sinai and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, “the health department has concluded that the patient is unlikely to have Ebola.

Specimens are being tested for common causes of illness and to definitively exclude Ebola. Testing results will be made available by C.D.C. as soon as they are available.”

At NYU Langone Medical Center last week, a patient who went to the emergency room with a fever and who mentioned a recent visit to West Africa was given a mask and moved to a secluded area, said Dr. Michael Phillips, the hospital’s director of Infection Prevention and Control. But further questioning revealed that the patient had not visited any of the affected countries, “so we stopped right there,” Dr. Phillips said.

At Bellevue Hospital Center last week, a patient was placed in isolation, but it quickly became clear that he did not have Ebola.

An Ebola outbreak centered mainly in three West African countries — Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia — has infected more than 1,300 people and killed more than 700 of them. American health officials have advised against nonessential travel to the three countries, and have urged doctors to be on high alert for people who return from the region with symptoms like fever, diarrhea and vomiting.

A Mount Sinai spokeswoman, Dorie Klissas, said that to protect the patient’s privacy the hospital was declining to make public his occupation, which country he had been in, whether he had been exposed to a patient with Ebola there, or whether he had close contacts like family members, friends or co-workers who were also at risk. Officials said they expected the results of the tests for Ebola within 24 to 48 hours.

In a statement to employees, hospital officials said that Ebola was spread only by direct contact with bodily fluids, and that infection control measures were being employed to protect patients and staff members.

In the Bellevue Hospital Center case, Dr. Ross Wilson, the chief medical officer at the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, said that the man had symptoms also found in Ebola patients. He had arrived at Kennedy Airport from West Africa and was being detained by security personnel at the airport for an unrelated matter when he fell ill.

“He developed a headache and fever,” Dr. Wilson said. He was transported to Bellevue, but the people who brought him there did not suspect Ebola.

Continue reading the main story
“We immediately put the dots together,” Dr. Wilson said.

Following the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every patient entering one of the city’s 11 hospitals who has fever, headache and other symptoms associated with Ebola (as well as countless other ailments), is asked two new questions.

“Have you traveled to or from West African countries in the last 10 days? Have you been in contact with an Ebola patient or with anyone who has been in contact with an Ebola patient?”

When someone is suspected of having the infection, there are three key things that doctors rely on to make the diagnosis, Dr. Wilson said.

First, the history of travel and contacts is critical. Second is whether the symptoms match those of Ebola.

Finally, there are blood tests. There are only two facilities in the country that can perform these kinds of blood tests, including at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The blood tests are exceedingly complicated, he said, and there are different tests depending on the degree of sickness of the patient. Generally, he said, a 100 percent confirmation can take several days.

 

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  posted on 8/7/2014 at 08:40 AM
http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/08/06/ebola-nigeria-saudi-ara bia-virus-death-toll/13663973/


CDC issues highest-level alert for Ebola

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued its highest-level alert for a response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa.

"Ops Center moved to Level 1 response to given the extension to Nigeria & potential to affect many lives," CDC chief Tom Frieden said Wednesday on Twitter.

Level 1 means that increased staff and resources will be devoted to the outbreak, officials said. It is the first time the agency has invoked its highest level alert since 2009, over a flu outbreak.

Meantime, a Nigerian nurse who had treated the country's first fatality from Ebola two weeks ago has died from the virus that has now claimed more than 900 lives in the latest outbreak, Nigerian health officials said.

The World Health Organization, which convened a two-day emergency meeting of global health workers to discuss the crisis in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, said Wednesday that the death toll had jumped to 932, an increase of 45 fatalities in just four days.

Next week, the WHO will convene a panel of medical ethicists to explore the use of experimental treatment in the latest outbreak in West Africa.

In a statement on Wednesday, the WHO noted that the recent use of experimental drugs to treat two American medical missionaries has raised questions on whether drugs that have never been tested on humans should be used and, if so, who should receive it when there is only an extremely limited amount.

The two Americans, Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, have been repatriated from Liberia and are being treated for Ebola at the Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

In New York, Mount Sinai Hospital said a patient placed in isolation since Monday does not have an Ebola infection, as feared. The patient is in stable condition and "improving," a statement from the hospital said.

In Nigeria, health officials said five other Nigerian health workers who also had treated American Patrick Sawyer have been diagnosed with the disease. Sawyer, a financial expert of Liberian descent who lives in Minnesota, died July 25 after arriving in Lagos on a flight from Liberia.

Meanwhile, a Saudi man being tested for the disease has died in Jeddah after returning from Sierra Leone on Sunday, according to Saudi health authorities.

If the Saudi death is found to be linked to the Ebola virus, it would be the first fatality outside the four West African countries during the latest outbreak, the Saudi Health Ministry says.

In Liberia late Wednesday, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf declared a state of emergency because of the Ebola outbreak, saying some civil rights may have to be suspended as a result of the crisis. At least 282 people in Liberia have died from the disease.

In her televised speech, Sirleaf said that "ignorance and poverty, as well as entrenched religious and cultural practices, continue to exacerbate the spread of the disease."

Earlier, Nigerian health minister, Onyebuchi Chukwu, speaking to reporters in the capital, Abuja, confirmed the death of the Nigerian nurse on Tuesday and said the five newly diagnosed cases are being treated at an isolation ward in Lagos, The Guardian reports.

Lagos health officials also acknowledged that Sawyer was not initially isolated after becoming ill because authorities did not know immediately that he had contracted the Ebola virus.

There is no known cure for Ebola. Experts say people infected with the virus can spread the disease only through their bodily fluids and after they show symptoms. Since the incubation period can last up to three weeks, some of the Nigerians who treated Sawyer are only now showing signs of illness that can mimic many common tropical illnesses — fever, muscle aches and vomiting.

In April, Saudi Arabia said it would not issue visas this year to Muslim pilgrims from Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea during the hajj pilgrimage to Mecca.

Saudi Ambassador in Guinea Amjad Bedaiwi was quoted in the Saudi Arab News Wednesday as saying the decision affects a total of 7,400 pilgrims from those three countries.

Meanwhile, Spain was sending a specially equipped plane to Liberia to pick up a 75-year-old Spanish missionary priest, Miguel Pajares, and two nuns who have tested positive for the virus.

Q&A: The CDC on experimental Ebola drugs

The three had worked at St. Joseph's Catholic hospital, which was shut down following the death last week from Ebola of Patrick Nshamdze, the hospital's director. Three other hospital staff members have been diagnosed with the disease.

In Washington, President Obama pledged international support for the countries affected by the Ebola outbreak in remarks at the U.S.-Africa summit.

"The United States and our international partners will continue to do whatever we can to help our African partners respond to this crisis and stand with the people of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone," he said.

 

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  posted on 8/7/2014 at 02:31 PM
Every cloud has a silver lining tho' hey? Some "Christian" input.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/07/rick-wiles-ebola_n_5658481.html

Talk show host Rick Wiles took to his radio program this week to spout off about what he views as the great "attitude adjustment" America so desperately needs: the Ebola virus. In the eyes of Wiles, this pandemic could be an instrument of God used to destroy everyone that He deems immoral and unfit, such as queer people, atheists and those who've had an abortion. The right-wing pundit stated:

Now this Ebola epidemic can become a global pandemic and that’s another name for plague. It may be the great attitude adjustment that I believe is coming. Ebola could solve America’s problems with atheism, homosexuality, sexual promiscuity, pornography and abortion. If Ebola becomes a global plague, you better make sure the blood of Jesus is upon you, you better make sure you have been marked by the angels so that you are protected by God. If not, you may be a candidate to meet the Grim Reaper.

 

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  posted on 8/7/2014 at 02:45 PM
quote:
Every cloud has a silver lining tho' hey? Some "Christian" input.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/07/rick-wiles-ebola_n_5658481.html

Talk show host Rick Wiles took to his radio program this week to spout off about what he views as the great "attitude adjustment" America so desperately needs: the Ebola virus. In the eyes of Wiles, this pandemic could be an instrument of God used to destroy everyone that He deems immoral and unfit, such as queer people, atheists and those who've had an abortion. The right-wing pundit stated:

Now this Ebola epidemic can become a global pandemic and that’s another name for plague. It may be the great attitude adjustment that I believe is coming. Ebola could solve America’s problems with atheism, homosexuality, sexual promiscuity, pornography and abortion. If Ebola becomes a global plague, you better make sure the blood of Jesus is upon you, you better make sure you have been marked by the angels so that you are protected by God. If not, you may be a candidate to meet the Grim Reaper.
What a jackass!. I hope ebola takes mr. wiles and his like.

[Edited on 8/7/2014 by pops42]

 

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  posted on 8/7/2014 at 05:46 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/07/health/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

Initial Ebola response called a 'failure'
By Jen Christensen and Jacque Wilson, CNN
updated 6:03 PM EDT, Thu August 7, 2014

(CNN) -- Missionaries from Samaritan's Purse had hoped they wouldn't have to become involved in the clinical care of Ebola patients in West Africa. But by June, they realized they had no choice, says Ken Isaacs, vice president of international programs and government relations for Samaritan's Purse.

The deadly Ebola virus had spread from Guinea to Liberia and Sierra Leone. At the time, nearly 400 cases and more than 200 deaths had been reported.

Now there are more than 1,711 suspected and confirmed Ebola cases in the region, including 932 deaths, according to the World Health Organization, and the epidemic has spread to Nigeria.

Samaritan's Purse believes these numbers represent fewer than half of the real number of cases, Isaacs said Thursday at an emergency congressional hearing on the Ebola outbreak.

"The Ebola crisis we are now facing is not a surprise to us at Samaritan's Purse, but it took two Americans getting the disease in order for the international community and the United States to take serious notice of the largest outbreak of the disease in history," Isaacs said.

He characterized the initial international response to the Ebola outbreak as a "failure" because the virus spread outside the country where the outbreak originated. He said that a broader coordinated intervention is the only thing that will slow the size and speed of this disease.

"The ministries of health in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone do not have the capacity to handle these crises in their countries," Isaacs said. If the international community does not get involved, "the world will be relegating the containment of this disease that threatens Africa and other countries to three of the poorest nations in the world."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden agrees that the number of people who have been infected with Ebola is likely undercounted. That's in large part, he said at the hearing, because there are a limited number of lab facilities there to confirm the cases accurately.

That's why developing a better lab system is so important, he said. The CDC is working with international partners, the U.S. Defense Department and the National Institutes of Health to bulk up the lab infrastructure in West Africa and to develop a better way to transport blood samples to those labs.

What's most important, Frieden said, is that people understand that there is a clear way to stop this outbreak -- and that's at the source in Africa. This, he said, is the only way to get it under control.

"It's laborious. It's hard. It requires local knowledge and local action."

Stopping the epidemic will be particularly challenging since the local health system is so weak, he said. While the CDC will send at least 50 staff in the next week or two, the health system has to be beefed up to stop and prevent future outbreaks.

Frieden said that someone once told him the CDC is the world's 911 system. While he appreciated the compliment, he wants to make sure that every country or region has its own 911.

Dr. Ariel Pablos-Méndez, the assistant administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development's Bureau for Global Health, said that USAID is providing funding to help with the response to this outbreak.

They are coordinating a response with local health workers and have provided 35,000 sets of protective equipment, supplies, soap and water. Many health care workers are still laboring in the region without protective gear, which is why these workers make up a large portion of Ebola cases.

There was a sense of optimism at the hearing.

"We are confident we can contain and stop the virus," said Bisa Williams, the State Department's deputy assistant secretary for the Bureau of African Affairs.

The State Department is working closely with the governments of all the countries impacted by the outbreak. They are trying to help health care providers gain access to affected areas. They are also giving technical and financial assistance to treatment centers.

Williams said an international response will be essential.

 

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  posted on 8/8/2014 at 07:47 AM
I heard this morning that DuPont is ramping up production of these suits. I have not found confirmation of this yet though. I am curious as to how much they are increasing production.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/05/ebola-protection-suits_n_5651154.h tml

This Is What Doctors Wear To Protect Themselves Against Ebola In West Africa
The Huffington Post | By Amanda L. Chan
Posted: 08/05/2014 11:50 am EDT Updated: 08/05/2014 11:59 am EDT

When a contagious virus has a high fatality rate, you must take measures to protect yourself from contracting it -- especially if it's your job to come into contact with patients who have it.

Enter the Personal Protection Equipment worn by doctors in West Africa, who are on the front lines of the worst Ebola virus outbreak in history. At this point, you've likely seen images of doctors wearing the gear, which involves a layer of scrubs, rubber boots, an impermeable Tyvek suit and hood, a respirator and googles. TIME put together a video explaining each element of the Personal Protection Equipment suit, which you can watch above.

Because the Ebola virus can only be transmitted through contact with bodily fluids, the suits are meant to protect the wearer from directly touching any contaminated fluids. Infection control, through sterilization of equipment and surfaces, is also extremely important, since the virus can also be contracted through contact with contaminated surfaces.

 

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  posted on 8/9/2014 at 12:55 PM
quote:
quote:
Life sure is good in the good ol' USA.


All it takes is one infected person to walk through a crowded airport.
Try reading "Executive Orders" by Tom Clancy


And infect the scanning machines, who is liable for mass infecting of people then? it is a valid question. But something else needs to be done, we should close our borders to people travelling FROM the infected countries. Do not let anyone in from those countries. Anyone wanting to travel to those countries, fine, they can leave here, but they cannot come back till the disease is contained OVER THERE. Why hasn't anyone suggested that? (can't limit the rights of Africans to travel here and infect people?)

[Edited on 8/9/2014 by gina]

 

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  posted on 8/24/2014 at 11:18 AM
next week will be 30 days more and i'm pretty sure the infected and death toll has doubled again

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/24/world/africa/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp _t2

First WHO worker stricken with Ebola
By Joyce Joseph, Nana Karikari-apau, and Leslie Holland, CNN
updated 11:30 AM EDT, Sun August 24, 2014

(CNN) -- For the first time, a worker with the World Health Organization has fallen ill from Ebola, the WHO told CNN on Sunday.
The health worker, a man from Senegal, is in Sierra Leone and receiving care, the WHO said. No further details were given immediately.
When asked how the worker contracted the virus, a WHO spokesperson said officials don't yet know all the details.
Separately, a British citizen infected with the virus in Sierra Leone is being flown home, the British Department of Health announced Sunday.
The man, simply identified as William, lives in the West African nation in a home established by an American university for researchers.
He is a volunteer nurse in Kenema Government Hospital, where he was working with Ebola patients, according to Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University.
Garry is manager of the university's program that researches Ebola. The hospital is run by the government of Sierra Leone, but receives support from Tulane researchers.

The UK government said a specially equipped C17 Royal Air Force plane would transport the patient, who would be transferred to an isolation unit at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust.
"UK hospitals have a proven record of dealing with imported infectious diseases and this patient will be isolated and will receive the best care possible," said deputy chief medical officer John Watson in a press release.
Meanwhile, Ivory Coast announced Saturday that it's closing its borders in response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
Prime Minister Daniel Duncan signed the order that closes the land borders Ivory Coast shares with Guinea and Liberia.
The borders will remain closed until further notice in an effort to prevent the Ebola virus from spreading into its territory, according to the government statement.
Ebola is one of the world's most virulent diseases, according to the WHO.
The virus is introduced to human populations through the human handling of infected animals -- like fruit bats, gorillas and monkeys, to name a few -- found sick or dying in the rainforest.
The infection is then transmitted among humans through direct contact with the blood or other bodily fluids of infected people.
WHO's maps of confirmed cases show the Ebola outbreak is limited to four West African nations -- Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria. So far, nearly 2,500 suspected cases have been reported in what the WHO says is the worst known outbreak of the disease.
However, the WHO's website says the survival rate for people with Ebola in this outbreak has been 47%, which is a substantial improvement over the disease's survival rate, historically.
CNN's Aliza Kassim and Carma Hassan contributed to this report.

 

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  posted on 8/27/2014 at 03:20 PM
Ok the numbers have doubled again as of today I think. we went from 350 dead to 700 dead to now over 1500 dead. will it double again in 30 days? a new strain possibly in the congo with 13 dead 24 infected. i think that one will be under control soon.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/27/health/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

Ebola outbreak: 'It's even worse than I'd feared'
By Jacque Wilson, CNN
updated 3:25 PM EDT, Wed August 27, 2014

(CNN) -- "It's even worse than I'd feared," Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Wednesday of the Ebola outbreak rampaging through West Africa. "Every day this outbreak goes on, it increases the risk for another export to another country.

"The sooner the world comes together to help Liberia and West Africans, the safer we will all be."

Frieden spoke to CNN's Nima Elbagir in Monrovia, Liberia, where fear and anger over the largest Ebola outbreak on record has grown as health officials put up quarantines around some of the capital city's poorest areas.

More than 2,600 people have been infected by Ebola in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria since the outbreak began in December, according to the World Health Organization. Nearly 1,500 have died.

Health care workers at risk

A CDC staff member was recently flown home to the United States on a private charter after spending time in close proximity with another health care worker who tested positive for Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The CDC worker is reportedly healthy and has shown no symptoms of the deadly virus. He or she is simply rotating back to the United States as previously scheduled, according to the CDC. It is CDC policy that people who have been exposed to Ebola and are traveling long distances do so on a private plane in the three weeks after exposure to lower the risk of spreading the infection.

"We think it's the right thing to do, to bring them home," CDC spokesman Tom Skinner said. "They want to come home. Their tour of duty was up, and we've made it crystal clear that if they go over there and have something like this happen and want to go home, we're going to bring them home."

The staff member will be monitored for 21 days -- the longest known incubation period -- for Ebola symptoms, but he or she currently "poses no Ebola-related risk to friends, family, co-workers, or the public," the CDC said in a statement.

The other health care worker, who tested positive for Ebola, has been flown to Germany to recover, Skinner said.

The World Health Organization said Monday that 120 health care workers have died in the Ebola outbreak, and twice that number have been infected.

Public health experts say several factors are to blame, including a shortage of protective gear and improper use of the gear they do have.

The fact that the disease has killed so many people working to care for infected patients is making it increasingly hard to combat the virus in West Africa, WHO said.

"It depletes one of the most vital assets during the control of any outbreak. WHO estimates that in the three hardest-hit countries, only one to two doctors are available to treat 100,000 people, and these doctors are heavily concentrated in urban areas."

Another outbreak

On Tuesday, the Ministry of Health for the Democratic Republic of Congo notified WHO of another possible Ebola outbreak.

Health officials say a woman in the Central African country became ill with symptoms of Ebola after butchering a bush animal that had been given to her by her husband. She died on August 11. Since then health care workers, relatives and other individuals who came in contact with her body have developed symptoms and died.

Between July 28 and August 18, a total of 24 suspected cases of an unidentified hemorrhagic fever, including 13 deaths, have been identified, WHO said.

Samples have been sent to laboratories to confirm that these illnesses are being caused by the Ebola virus and to identify the strain. As none of the people involved has been to the four countries affected by the other Ebola epidemic, health officials believe this to be a separate outbreak.

The Democratic Republic of Congo has seen six smaller Ebola outbreaks since the 1970s, according to the CDC.


[Edited on 8/27/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 8/27/2014 by LeglizHemp]

 

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  posted on 9/2/2014 at 08:55 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/02/health/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

CDC director raises Ebola alarm
By Mariano Castillo, CNN
updated 9:24 AM EDT, Tue September 2, 2014

(CNN) -- The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is much worse than official figures show, and other countries are unintentionally making it harder to control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden told CNN on Tuesday.

"We've seen outbreaks of Ebola before. This is the first epidemic spreading widely through many countries, and it is spiraling out of control," said Frieden, who recently returned from a trip to the region. "It's bad now, much worse than the numbers show. It's going to get even worse in the very near future."

More than 2,600 people have been infected by Ebola in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria since the outbreak began in December, according to the World Health Organization. More than 1,500 have died.

Other countries are turning their backs on those coming from countries where the outbreak is strongest, even if they don't realize it, he said.

Measures to restrict flights and border crossings into the countries facing the outbreak were designed to contain the spread, but are having a paradoxical effect, Frieden said.

"This is making it really hard to get help in and to respond effectively to the outbreak," he said on CNN's "New Day."

"What we're seeing is a spiraling of cases, a hugely fast increase in cases, that's harder and harder to manage," he said. "The more we can get in there and tamp that down, the fewer cases we'll have in the weeks and months to come."

Frieden sounded the same alarm last week during a visit to Liberia.

The sooner the world unites to help West Africa, the safer the world will be, he said.

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said Monday that the massive Ebola outbreak in her country "remains grave."

"Our health delivery system is under stress. The international community couldn't respond quickly," she told CNN.

But she also sounded hopeful. She said that conditions are slowly improving and that the world is responding to the epidemic, realizing the catastrophe that could unfold if the virus were to spread beyond Africa's borders.

The West African nation of Senegal confirmed its first Ebola case last week, one week after closing its border with Guinea.

Senegal is the fifth country in the region to report the Ebola virus.

 

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  posted on 9/3/2014 at 08:35 AM
http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottgottlieb/2014/09/03/can-ebola-go-airborne/

Can Ebola Go Airborne?

A study in the journal Science, released last week, shows that the Ebola strain spreading across Western Africa has undergone a surprisingly high amount of genetic drift during the current outbreak. Experts say the mutations could eventually make the virus harder to diagnose and perhaps treat with a new therapeutic. But can mutations also enable Ebola to spread through the air.

In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, I write that in response to the crisis, the Obama administration has stressed that the disease is unlikely to spread inside America. We will certainly see cases diagnosed here, and perhaps even experience some isolated clusters of disease. For now, though, the administration’s assurances are generally correct: Health-care workers in advanced Western nations maintain infection controls that can curtail the spread of non-airborne diseases like Ebola.

But our relative comfort in the U.S., based on our belief that our advanced public health tools could easily contain a virus spread only through direct contact, would change radically if Ebola were to alter its mode of spread. We know the virus is mutating. Could in adapt in a way that makes it airborne?

It’s highly unlikely. It would be improbable for a virus to transform in a way that changes its mode of infection. Of the 23 known viruses that cause serious disease in man, none are known to have mutated in ways that changed how they infect humans. Of course, we only know about a small portion of the existing viruses.

A little background is in order.




The ability of Ebola to spread without direct contact with an infected individual, and whether or not it is efficiently spread through air, are different issues.

It’s already possible that Ebola can spread, in rare cases, through direct contact with respiratory secretions. This might occur, for example, when an infected person coughs or sneezes directly on another, uninfected individual. The Centers for Disease Control specifically recommends “droplet protection” be taken in the hospital setting when healthcare workers are treating patients infected with Ebola. This kind of direct spread is sometimes referred to as “droplet contact,” but it’s distinct from airborne spread.

When a viral infection becomes “airborne,” like ordinary influenza, it means that discharged microbes remain suspended in the air for long periods of time. Generally speaking, this is what is meant by “airborne transmission.” In this case, the organisms must be capable of surviving for long periods of time outside the body and must be resistant to drying. Airborne transmission allows organisms to enter the upper and lower respiratory tracts. This sort of transmission is sometimes also referred to as “droplet contact” or “viral droplet nuclei transmission.”

For this article, I am focused on the latter circumstance — whether or not Ebola could mutate in a way that makes it highly contagious through the air, by allowing the individual viral particles to survive for long periods suspended in dry air.

Right now, Ebola is spread through direct contact with the body fluids of actively infected individuals. Indirect transmission is also possible by means of contact with an object (fomite) that has been soiled by the body fluids of an infected individual.




The widespread belief is that the Ebola virus would be very unlikely to change in a way that would allow the individual virus particles to be concentrated, and remain suspended in respiratory secretions — and then infect contacts through inhalation.

The Ebola virus is comprised of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Such a structure makes it prone to undergoing rapid genetic changes. But to become airborne, a lot of unlikely events would need to occur. Ebola’s RNA genome would have to mutate to the point where the coating that surrounds the virus particles (the protein capsid) is no longer susceptible to harsh drying effects of being suspended in air.

To be spread through the air, it also generally helps if the virus is concentrated in the lungs of affected patients. For humans, this is not the case. Ebola generally isn’t an infection of the lungs. The main organ that the virus targets is the liver. That is why patients stricken with Ebola develop very high amounts of the virus in the blood and in the feces, and not in their respiratory secretions.

Could Ebola mutate in a way that confers these qualities on the virus?

Anything is possible. But such a scientific feat would rate as highly unlikely. A lot of the speculation that Ebola could be airborne stems from a set of earlier studies that showed Ebola virus may have been able to spread through the air between infected pigs and monkeys. There are reasons why these studies are not applicable when it comes to questions around human-to-human transmission. In animals, Ebola behaves differently than it does in people, for example concentrating in lung tissue.

Nonetheless, the fact that the Ebola virus is undergoing rapid changes reinforces the urgency of getting this epidemic under control. We need to snuff it out. While the virus is unlikely to be modified in a way that changes its mode of infection, the resulting mutations could nonetheless make it harder to diagnose, or even treat.

Moreover, our ability to prevent an epidemic here in the U.S. doesn’t relinquish our obligations abroad. Even if the epidemic remains confined to Western Africa, the outbreak could rank as one the cruelest natural catastrophes of recent times—if not in human death and suffering, then certainly in the economic and social devastation caused by declining commerce, and the strife resulting from mass cordons. As I note in the Wall Street Journal, “compared with a one-time act of nature, like a storm, that delivers its destruction at once; the swelling nature of a viral epidemic can magnify its impact on economic and civil life.”

For all of these reasons, and most of all for the humanitarian imperative; we need to be very concerned about the epidemic unfolding in Western Africa, even if the U.S. isn’t at direct risk of an outbreak now. We need a vigorous plan for helping that region deal with this evolving catastrophe.

 

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  posted on 9/4/2014 at 09:04 PM
booooooo scary

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/a-2006-mathematical-model-shows-how-ebola- could-wipe-us-out

This Mathematical Model from 2006 Shows How Ebola Could Wipe Us Out

Written by
JORDAN PEARSON
September 4, 2014 // 03:50 PM EST

The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the worst in history, and the death toll just surpassed 1,900. Previous WHO estimates indicated that the outbreak would end mid-fall, but the situation is quickly spiraling out of control and into a sea of unknowns.

The “Ebola epidemic is the largest, and most severe, and most complex we have ever seen in the nearly 40-year history of this disease,” World Health Organization director general Margaret Chan said in a special briefing yesterday. “No one, even outbreak responders, [has] ever seen anything like it.”

Yaneer Bar-Yam, the complex systems analyst whose model accurately predicted the global unrest that led to the Arab Spring, is also worried about the patterns he sees in the disease's advance. Models he designed for the New England Complex Systems Institute back in 2006 show that Ebola could rapidly spread, and, in a worse case scenario, even cause an extinction event, if enough infected people make it through an international airport.

“What happened was that we were modelling the dynamics of the evolution of diseases—of pathogens—and we showed that if you just add a very small amount of long-range transportation, the diseases escape their local context and eventually drive everything to extinction,” Bar-Yam told Motherboard. “They drive their hosts to extinction.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNaQUlIa5_E

Bar-Yam says he has informed the WHO and the CDC of his findings, but they haven’t listened, he said.

“I just gave a lecture to the World Health Organization in January and I told them. I said, there’s this transition to extinction and we don’t know when it’s going to happen,” Bar-Yam explained. “But I don’t think that there has been a sufficient response.”

Normally, the spread of a predator—and this is as true for Ebola as it is for invasive animal species—is stymied when it overexploits its prey, effectively drying up its own food source. In rural areas like those where the current Ebola outbreak is centered, diseases tend to contain themselves by wiping out all available hosts in a concentrated area.



If a particularly aggressive predator happens to make it out of its local context, say, on an international flight, Bar-Yam’s models show that it can avoid local extinction through long-range dispersal. At this point, the linear model of the disease's outbreak makes a statistical transition into an entirely different dynamic; extinction for all of its hosts across vast geographic distances, and only afterwards for the disease.

The argument has been made that an Ebola outbreak would not be as severe in the West as it is in Africa, because the poor healthcare infrastructure where the disease has struck is the chief vector of its spread. Bar-Yam sees this assumption as a vast overestimation of our handle on the dynamics of disease containment.

“The behavior of an individual in a major metropolitan area in terms of engaging with the health care system depends on a lot of different factors,” Bar-Yam explained. “A reasonable person might be have in one way, but another person will behave in another. We don’t know what happens if someone with Ebola throws up in a subway before that gets cleaned up and people understand that happened because of Ebola.”

Panic is never a wise thing to incite, because it can result in exactly the kinds of unpredictable behavior that Bar-Yam is warning us about. However, a healthy amount of fear is a different matter.

“The question becomes, at what point do we hit the panic button? What does it look like to hit the panic button?” he said.

Bar-Yam’s suggested approach to containing the outbreak is radical, he admits, and flies in the face of the WHO’s nonplussed reaction to Korean Airlines, which stopped running flights into Kenya last week. According to the WHO, halting flights to West Africa makes it difficult for healthcare experts to make it into the region to help. Bar-Yam agrees, but maintains that the danger of the disease coming back with them is too great a risk.

“They’re saying they need a large number of healthcare professionals to go there and deal with this. But that doesn’t mean that people have to leave there,” he said. “One sets up a one-way transportation system where people can go there to deal with the disease.”

It’s a prescription that is likely to bristle healthcare experts who'd to help Africans suffering from Ebola without necessarily signing their own death certificate. However, Bar-Yam said, the possibility of Ebola making it into a metropolitan area is far more grim than any potential containment efforts.

While the outbreak response thus far has been more or less handled on an individual basis, treating cases as they pop up while simultaneously studying the infection, a containment attempt to limit movement in and around the diseased area is a systemic response, and that’s exactly what’s needed.

“If the disease comes to an urban area in the United States, the targeted response of addressing individuals who have the infection is not the same as a systemic response that addresses the ability of the disease to spread,” Bar-Yam said. “We need to have the knowledge and understanding of how to do a systemic response.”

 

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  posted on 9/5/2014 at 11:04 AM
From the CDC website:

If you must travel to an area with known Ebola cases, make sure to do the following:

•Practice careful hygiene. Avoid contact with blood and body fluids.
•Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.
•Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
•Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these animals.
•Avoid hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated. The U.S. embassy or consulate is often able to provide advice on facilities.
•After you return, monitor your health for 21 days and seek medical care immediately if you develop symptoms of Ebola.

Looks like if it is going to be an extinction event, it will be the extinction of the segment of the population that is ignorant of simple hygiene practices. I'm good with that. Just wash your hands and handle public door handles with care until its over, and you will inherit the planet.

[Edited on 9/5/2014 by BrerRabbit]

 

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  posted on 9/6/2014 at 01:54 PM
Problem is like with other pathogens, the virus lives after the people who left their germs are no longer in the vicinity. I remember a tuberculosis epidemic in upper Manhattan in the late 1980's, you could ride on a subway and the droplets containing the bacteria were still there after another passenger left. You come in and breathe them, get infected and never saw anyone cough near you. Pneumonia, flu, same thing.

Even the food chain, America has migrant workers who do not have sanitized working conditions, they relieve themselves in the fields, the bacteria gets onto the food. The animals we eat are fed corn, GMO corn to fatten them up, the grass they eat has acid rain on it, it just goes on and on, the contamination.

 

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  posted on 9/23/2014 at 07:32 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/23/world/africa/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp _t2

Ebola has claimed 2,800 lives in 6 months, WHO study finds
By Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
updated 6:28 AM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014

(CNN) -- The death toll from Ebola in West Africa has now climbed to more than 2,800, with 5,800 cases confirmed as of Monday, the World Health Organization said.

In the six months since this outbreak was first formally reported, 337 health care workers have been infected, of whom more than 181 have died, the WHO said.

Its six-month situation report -- which assesses the situation in the three countries at the center of the outbreak, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone -- is dedicated to those health workers "who, as an expression of our innately shared human compassion, risked their lives, and lost them."

It also looks at the likelihood of the virus spreading into other countries.

In what may be seen as an encouraging sign, the WHO indicates that "countries with well-developed health systems and services are unlikely to see much -- if any -- onward transmission of Ebola virus disease following an imported case."


 
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