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Author: Subject: Ebola

World Class Peach



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  posted on 11/19/2014 at 01:22 PM


 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 11/24/2014 at 09:17 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/21/world/africa/ebola-spread-has-slowed-in-l iberia-cdc-says.html?_r=0

Ebola Spread Has Slowed in Liberia, C.D.C. Says
By HELENE COOPERNOV. 20, 2014


WASHINGTON — The international response to West Africa’s Ebola epidemic, coupled with more effective action by local communities, has stopped the exponential spread of the disease in one of the hardest-hit countries, Liberia, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday.

In confirming what health officials and news organizations had reported for weeks, Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, the C.D.C. director, said that a previous worse-case projection by the agency that the Ebola epidemic could lead to 1.4 million cases by late January unless effective measures were taken to contain it was no longer applicable, crediting what he called “good progress” in Liberia.

“There’s been a substantial change in the trend,” Dr. Frieden said during a conference call with reporters. “There is no longer exponential increase, and in fact, there’s been a decrease” in the rate of infections in Liberia.

Health officials are less certain of the rate of infections in Guinea, another of the three most affected countries. Dr. Frieden said that in the third country, Sierra Leone, “both their epidemic and their response are several weeks behind Liberia.” He added that he hoped an increase in international aid to Sierra Leone, particularly from Britain, would help bring down the numbers there as well.

His comments came a day after the Pentagon said it was scaling back the size and number of Ebola treatment facilities that American troops are building in Liberia. Defense officials said that instead of building 17 units, as promised by President Obama, the military would build 10 treatment facilities, and that seven of them would have 50 beds each, rather than the 100 beds previously planned.

In addition, two other units that were to have been built by American troops will be built instead by an international aid group, administration officials said. Defense officials also said they were scaling back the number of American military personnel responding to the epidemic in West Africa, to 3,000 from 4,000.

Still, American defense and health officials cautioned that Ebola remained a significant health crisis in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and warned against letting up in the international aid effort there.

“There have been big changes in community behavior,” Dr. Frieden said. But he added that there were still, by some estimates, 1,000 to 2,000 new Ebola cases a week — the bulk of those now in Guinea and Sierra Leone. He said the effort to combat Ebola would continue to require “a massive undertaking” to chase each case, including finding people who have had contact with the virus.

The World Health Organization’s latest update on Ebola, posted Wednesday on its website, said the number of confirmed, probable and suspected cases totaled 15,145, with 5,420 reported deaths, as of Sunday. Nearly all were in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with two deaths in the United States.

Though reported cases no longer appear to be increasing in Liberia or Guinea, the update said, “transmission remains intense and widespread in Sierra Leone,” with Freetown, the capital, remaining the worst-affected area.

The update also said that at least 584 health care workers, who are among those most at risk of contracting the disease, had been infected, and that 329 had died.

Cuban health officials reported Tuesday that a Cuban doctor, one of the 165 medical workers sent by Cuba to help battle the Ebola outbreak, had become the first in that group to be infected. The doctor, identified as Felix Baez, had been treating patients in Sierra Leone and was flown to Switzerland for treatment.



[Edited on 11/24/2014 by LeglizHemp]

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 11/25/2014 at 09:50 AM
http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/11/25/millions-promised-for-ebol a-not-adding-up.html


Millions Promised for Ebola Not Adding Up

Of the countries that promised money to fight Ebola, little has been delivered: 7 percent of China’s $122 million pledge, 17 percent of the $265 million promised by the EU, and 43 percent of the United States’ $572 million.

“Countries have promised resources to fight Ebola. Which have delivered?”

It’s this question that inspired nonprofit ONE.org to create an Ebola tracker to figure out just that. While the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the UN, and the World Bank have data on the dollar figures associated with each pledge, no one had taken the time to figure out how much of those resources have actually made it to the ground in West Africa.

The answer, as of today, isn’t much.

Culling information directly from government representatives, press releases, technical bodies, and other research, ONE has zeroed in on what exactly the international relief effort in West Africa looks like, at this point. The tracker focuses on three specific forms of support: financing, health-care personnel, and in-kind contributions. This “deeper dive” into individual country’s commitments, ONE hopes, will persuade leaders to put their money where their mouth is.

In the financing portion, the numbers are particularly bleak. While China has pledged $122 million to the fight, it has thus far only dispersed 7 percent of that number. Of the $265 million pledged by EU Institutions, just 17 percent have reached the epidemic’s hot zone. Even private institutions, which most likely have less bureaucratic hurdles to deal with, have been slow to pull the trigger. The Silicon Valley Community Fund has thus far sent 0 percent of the 25 million pledged. At the Google/Larry Page Family Foundation, it’s the identical equation.

Erin Hohlfelder, global health policy director at ONE and the brains behind the tracker, says the tracker shows the importance in transparency. “It’s one thing to make a great pledge and commit to doing that,” says Hohlfelder. “But in the meantime, every day that goes by without these resources is a missed opportunity.” While progress has been made in the months since those pledges, there is much work still to be done.

The largest and longest Ebola epidemic of its kind, the crisis has resulted in an estimated 15,351 cases of Ebola and 5,459 deaths since March—numbers that the World Health Organization’s director has called a “vast underestimate” of the reality. While Liberia has shown progress in halting the epidemic’s spread, in continues to grow in neighboring Sierra Leone and Mali. According to October estimates from the World Bank, the epidemic could cost the West African countries affected upward of $32 billion in the next 24 months.

If more help doesn’t arrive soon, the worst may not be over.

If there’s a reason for delay in stopping the epidemic, she says, the lack of resources may be to blame. “This isn’t a nice-to-do development project, this is still an emergency,” Hohlfelder tells me. “While we wouldn’t expect 100 percent dispersal, a lot of these are pathetically low.”

The outbreak, which has now spanned eight countries and four continents, has largely centered on three countries in West Africa: Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. In some ways, the rapid spread of the virus there should not be surprising. Crippled by bitter decade-long civil wars, all three countries were in the midst of rebuilding broken health-care systems when the epidemic struck. Void of basic necessities like running water, many towns were struggling to meet even basic rudimentary health-care needs—a predicament that left them woefully unprepared for the onslaught of a major global health crisis.

Ebola hasn’t simply overwhelmed these health-care systems—it has decimated them. Women in need of support for childbirth have been turned away, leading to an increase in infant morality rates in a region with the some of the highest numbers in the world. Kids suffering from malaria or extreme diarrhea are now too often left without medical care. Life-saving vaccines for those illnesses and others are—without enough medical workers to dispense them—going unused.

It’s safe to say that restoring peace in the health-care systems of these three countries will be a marathon, not a sprint. But in order to commence rebuilding them from the ground up, the world must first put out the fires of this current epidemic. As leaders across the world continue to assert, the war is far from won.

At a press conference last week, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said that the progress her country has made may be damaging. “Our government remains concerned that progress in this battle will lead to complacency on the part of the international community,” said Sirleaf. “We must not interpret gains as an outright victory—nothing could be more dangerous.”

Head of the UN Mission for Emergency Ebola Response (UNMEER) Anthony Banbury said this week in Washington that containing the epidemic still calls for a “tremendous increase” in resources on the ground. “We are far, far away from ending this crisis,” said Banbury. “There is a long battle ahead of us.”

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon echoed these remarks at another meeting in Washington D.C. on Wednesday. After acknowledging that there has been a “bend in the curve” and a reason to hope, he warned against inaction. “We need more international responders—trained medical teams and volunteer health workers—especially in remote districts,” said Ban. “I am asking the international community to continue their support. Our experts say that we need to have at least fivefold strength and support, because, still, the international response is outpaced by this Ebola spread.”

Margaret Chan, director of the World Health Organization, followed Ban’s remarks. “We must not forget—Ebola virus is a formidable enemy. Yes, we are seeing some early signals of hope. Cases are stabilizing. But as Mr. Secretary-General was saying, we are also seeing some new areas where they are reporting new cases,” said Chan. “We must maintain our vigilance. Complacency would be our enemy. And in order to get it to zero, we have been successful in bending the curve a bit, but we need to continue to do more to get to zero.”

Inspired by this, the United States urged world leaders to raise $100 million in additional funds for West Africa’s debts, allowing them to “reinvest” in health and other public programming.

Even in the United States, which is leading the pack financially (having dispersed 43 percent of the $572 million pledged thus far), concern for the global health crisis is waning. At an important Ebola meeting on Capital Hill last week, Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill was shocked to find it half-full. “Fascinating. Empty seats and no cameras for hearing on Ebola & public health…” she tweeted.

As the holidays approach, Hohlfelder worries that concern will further dwindle. “I think it will be really critical in the weeks to come,” she says. “Even if the attention spans continue to wane, we’re hopeful that we can do our small part and remind people that this crisis isn’t over—and even when it ends there will still be a rebuilding effort on the ground.”

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 11/26/2014 at 09:04 AM
http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2014/nov/26/ebola-isolation-us-military- base-pretty-much-vacation?CMP=twt_gu


Ebola isolation at US military base is 'pretty much vacation'

US troops returning from their Ebola mission in west Africa must spend 21 days in seclusion but life at their Virginia transit camp is not so tough

Associated Press in Hampton, Virginia
Wednesday 26 November 2014 08.10 EST

With plenty of flat screen TVs, game nights and even an outdoor fire pit, life in isolation for members of the US military who have returned from the Ebola mission in west Africa can look a lot like summer camp.

The Defense Department is requiring military service members to undergo 21 days of isolation and monitoring as a precaution, but that doesn’t mean the troops are sitting in a hospital or even just one building. At Langley air force base, one of five US bases designated to house returning service members for monitoring, a wooded section of the base near the runway has been turned into a small village.

Nearly 1,800 US troops have been deployed to Liberia and Senegal for the Ebola mission, along with almost 100 contractors and nearly 60 Defense Department civilians.

The 90 service members at Langley are among the first to return home since the Defense Department began requiring isolation as a precaution in November. They weren’t exposed to the deadly virus or any Ebola patients, but helped set up a facility in Liberia to treat medical workers who would be. For those in isolation, temperatures are taken twice daily. No one has exhibited any symptoms of virus since returning on 13 November.

Officially called the Langley transit center, the encampment hosts 21 small buildings that include dormitories, bathroom and shower facilities, a fitness center, cafeteria and an entertainment and recreation center.

“All I can say about this camp, Langley, it’s pretty much vacation. It’s Wi-Fi everywhere, flat screens everywhere, big gym to either lift or run. There’s an asphalt road kind of running around the perimeter that you can work out on,” said Chief Petty Officer Jason Knifley, an equipment operator stationed at Naval Construction Battalion Gulfport, Mississippi. He added, “This isn’t bad at all.”

The center is outfitted with video games, a small library and commercial internet, to allow service members to video chat with friends and family. There are often bingo, pool and ping-pong tournaments.




In the small dormitories, between six and eight service members each get their own full-size bed. The base allows each of the people in isolation to pick what they want for their three hot meals a day. A traditional Thanksgiving meal will be served on Thursday, and a Turkey Trot race and football game at an adjacent field will also be held for those in isolation.

Captain Jasamine Pettie, who the air force has dubbed the transit center’s mayor, said outside groups are also trying to meet the personal needs of the individuals who are there by getting donations for things like protein shakes and Gatorade. Sometimes, her job includes responding to small requests to have more bananas instead of apples and making sure printers have paper.

For air force Major Jeffrey Chaperon, a hospital administrator based at Langley who is under quarantine after working in Liberia, a lot of time at the center is spent exercising. He said the group of airmen, sailors, marines and soldiers at the facility are all keeping a positive attitude.

“They’ve outfitted this place very nice for us. They’ve offered a lot of amenities and morale type things for us to do. I will say it’s better than where we came from,” he said.

“Most of us have been in far worse conditions than this, and it’s only 21 days. You can stand on your head for three weeks if you’ve got to.”

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 12/2/2014 at 05:50 PM
the numbers on 11/11/14 were 13,042 and 4,818
now we are at 16,000 and 7000

this is the 1st month that both of those numbers didn't double. this doesn't mean we have won.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30260532

29 November 2014 Last updated at 10:21 ET

Ebola outbreak: West Africa death toll nears 7,000

The number of people killed by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has risen to 6,928, the World Health Organisation (WHO) says.

The toll has increased by over 1,000 since the WHO's last report on Wednesday, but it includes unreported deaths from earlier in the outbreak.

Experts say the infection rate is more significant that the death toll, as it reflects how the virus is spreading.

Infection rates are decreasing in Liberia, but are high in Sierra Leone.

There have been over 16,000 reported cases in Guinea, Sierra and Liberia.

Latest Ebola death tolls
Liberia: 7,244 cases, 4,181 deaths
Sierra Leone: 6,802 cases, 1,463 deaths
Guinea: 2,123 cases, 1,284 deaths

Mali has reported seven deaths from Ebola and 10 confirmed cases.

More than 4,181 people have died of Ebola in Liberia but while the country has recorded the highest number of cases, the rate of infection is slowing.

The outbreak was also now "stable" in Guinea, the World Health Organization (WHO) said last week.

The disease is now spreading fastest in Sierra Leone, with 6,802 cases reported in total.

Nigeria and Senegal are both clear of the quarantine period and no new cases or deaths have been reported.

Ebola is spread only through direct contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person showing symptoms, such as fever or vomiting.

People caring for the sick or handling the bodies of people infected Ebola are therefore especially vulnerable.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 12/9/2014 at 08:49 AM

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 12/12/2014 at 09:25 AM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/12/mali-ebola-_n_6314492.html

Last Known Ebola Patient In Mali Cured, Released
AP | By SARAH DiLORENZO
Posted: 12/12/2014 8:33 am EST

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — The last Ebola patient being treated in Mali has survived the disease and been released, the Health Ministry said Friday, leaving no known cases in the West African country.

Mali had recorded eight cases of Ebola, all of them linked to people who crossed from neighboring Guinea. The country now has no confirmed or suspected cases, according to the ministry, but authorities are still monitoring 26 people who had contact with the sick. A person infected with Ebola can take up to 21 days to show symptoms.

The last patient was discharged on Thursday after several Ebola tests came back negative, the ministry said in a statement posted on its website.





Because people are still being monitored and a sick person could cross the border again, the government warned Malians to remain vigilant.

Countries are only declared free of Ebola when 42 days — twice the maximum incubation period — have passed since anyone has had contact with a confirmed or probable case.

In the current outbreak, Ebola has sickened more than 18,100 people, the vast majority in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Of those, about 6,500 have died.

A photographer for the Washington Post sent to cover the outbreak in Liberia died on Thursday after collapsing while returning on foot from a village where he'd been working, the newspaper reported.

Michel du Cille, a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner, died before he reached Phebe Hospital in Bong County, Information Minister Lewis Brown told The Associated Press on Friday. It took two hours, traveling on dirt roads, to get Du Cille to the hospital after he collapsed, according to the paper.

Arrangements are being made to bring his body to Monrovia, Liberia's capital, Brown said.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 12/12/2014 at 09:27 AM
http://www.thehealthsite.com/news/latest-ebola-news-no-evidence-on-how-long -ebola-may-live/

Latest Ebola News: No evidence on how long Ebola may live
Agencies Dec 12, 2014 at 06:47 pm

Washington, Dec 11: According to a study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters, no one really knows whether the deadly Ebola virus can survive on glass surfaces or counter-tops or how long it remains active in water, wastewater, or sludge, new research has found. ‘The World Health Organisation has been saying you can put (human waste) in pit latrines or ordinary sanitary sewers and that the virus then dies,’ said Kyle Bibby of the University of Pittsburgh in US.

‘But the literature lacks evidence that it does. They may be right, but the evidence isn’t there,’ said Bibby. Bibby and colleagues from Drexel University explain that knowing how long the deadly pathogen survives on surfaces, in water, or in liquid droplets is critical to developing effective disinfection practices to prevent the spread of the disease. (Read: How the Ebola virus spreads in humans)

Currently, the World Health Organisation guidelines recommend to hospitals and health clinics that liquid wastes from patients be flushed down the toilet or disposed of in a latrine, researchers said. However, Ebola research labs that use patients’ liquid waste are supposed to disinfect the waste before it enters the sewage system. Bibby’s team set out to determine what research can and can’t tell us about these practices. (Read: 7 tips to prevent the spread of Ebola)

The researchers scoured scientific papers for data on how long the virus can live in the environment. They found a dearth of published studies on the matter. ‘That means no one knows for sure whether the virus can survive on a surface and cause infection or how long it remains active in water, wastewater, or sludge,’ researchers said. The team concluded that Ebola’s persistence outside the body needs more careful investigation. (Read: What is the Ebola virus disease survival rate?)

Source: PTI

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 12/16/2014 at 09:55 AM
http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/12/ebola-exaggeration-is-politifacts-2014-l ie-of-the-year/

‘Ebola exaggeration’ is PolitiFact’s 2014 Lie of the Year
David Ferguson
16 Dec 2014 at 09:26 ET

PolitiFact, the nonpartisan fact-checking organization headquartered at the Tampa Bay Times announced Monday that exaggeration about the threat posed by the disease Ebola is its 2014 Lie of the Year.

In the weeks before the mid-term elections, Republican politicians, right-wing talk radio personalities and cable news networks seized upon the story as a way of attacking the public health system and, by proxy, President Barack Obama.

PolitiFact’s Angie Drobnic Holan and Aaron Sharockman wrote, “PolitiFact and PunditFact rated 16 separate claims about Ebola as Mostly False, False or Pants on Fire on our Truth-O-Meter in 2014. Ten of those claims came in October, as [Ebola patient Thomas Eric] Duncan’s case came to the fore and as voters went to the polls to select a new Congress.”





Former Reagan aide and Washington Post pundit George Will claimed against all medical evidence that Ebola can be passed from person-to-person via coughing or sneezing.

“The problem is the original assumption, said with great certitude if not certainty, was that you need to have direct contact, meaning with bodily fluids from someone, because it’s not airborne,” Will falsely said. “There are doctors who are saying that in a sneeze or some cough, some of the airborne particles can be infectious.”

Eager Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) claimed that the hemorrhagic fever is “incredibly contagious,” “very transmissible” and “easy to catch,” a set of claims that PolitiFact rated as “mostly false.”

“A Georgia congressman claimed there were reports of people carrying diseases including Ebola across the southern border. Pants on Fire. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said Americans were told the country would be Ebola-free. False,” said the group.

Some critics point out that there are ugly racial undertones when white pundits attack a black president for a disease epidemic that is and was largely confined to continental Africa.

Fox News’ resident psychiatrist Keith Ablow even went so far as to say that Obama “welcomes” Ebola to the U.S. because “his affinities are with” Africa and its diseases.

All-in-all, only a tiny number of Americans were ever at risk for contracting Ebola. Even people who lived intimately with the health care workers and travelers who were infected remained uninfected after their quarantines.

Nonetheless, PolitiFact said, “When combined, the claims edged the nation toward panic. Governors fought Washington over the federal response. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stumbled to explain details about transmission of the virus and its own prevention measures. American universities turned away people from Africa, whether they were near the outbreak or not.”

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 12/20/2014 at 01:07 AM
not good for the ebola battle, countries who pledged aid money need to step up.

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-30548811

19 December 2014 Last updated at 08:34 ET
Nigeria makes further efforts to defend currency

Nigeria's central bank has brought in further measures to support its currency, the naira.

Buyers of foreign currency must use that money within 48 hours or be forced to sell it back at the rate set by the central bank.

The naira hit record lows this week of more than 187 against the dollar.

The prolonged fall in the oil price is causing serious problems for Nigeria, which is heavily dependent on the commodity.

Nigeria, which is Africa's largest oil producer, receives 70% of government revenue and 90% of all foreign exchange earnings from oil.

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) warned it would impose sanctions on anyone who did not follow its new rules.

Speculators are betting on further falls in the naira by buying foreign currency in the hope that they will be able to buy more when they reconvert their money back.

In November, the CBN devalued the naira to 168 against the dollar, but its action has not stopped it falling further.

Earlier this week, Nigeria was forced to revise its budget because of the dramatic fall in the price of oil.

Its finance minister, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, said its economy will now grow at 5.5% this year, rather than 6.4%.

In a separate development, Nigerian oil workers agreed to call off a strike that started on Monday.

A spokesman for one of the unions involved, Pengassan, said the government had given assurances that it would address union concerns over refinery maintenance.

This includes a renewed push to get a long-delayed bill passed in parliament, aimed at overhauling the industry and improving maintenance.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 1/6/2015 at 09:06 AM
the numbers on 11/11/14 were 13,042 and 4,818
now we are at 16,000 and 7000 12/2/14
now infected 20,000 people and killed 8,000. 1/6/15

things are slowing down dramtically but not out of the woods by a long shot.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



Karma:
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Registered: 9/9/2011
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  posted on 1/13/2015 at 11:18 AM
Inside the US Army's Ebola Lab in Liberia
Written by Brian Castner
January 13, 2015 // 09:45 AM EST

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/tappita-ebola-lab

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 1/22/2015 at 09:01 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30932578

22 January 2015 Last updated at 08:41 ET
Ebola cases show 'turning point'
By James Gallagher
Health editor, BBC News website

There has been a "turning point" in the Ebola crisis, with cases falling in the three affected countries, World Health Organization officials say.

Just eight cases were detected in Liberia in the last week down from a peak of 500-a-week in September. Guinea and Sierra Leone have also seen falls.

The WHO said the figures were the "most promising" since the outbreak started.

But it continues to urge caution, and to highlight the need to find those who had contact with Ebola patients.

The largest outbreak of Ebola in human history has infected 21,724 people and killed 8,641 - largely in just three countries, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

All are now showing falls in weekly cases:

Cases in Liberia stand at eight-per-week down from a peak of 509
Cases in Guinea stand at 20 per week down from a peak of 292
Cases in Sierra Leone stand at 117-per-week down from a peak of 748
There are now some days in Liberia where no cases are reported at all.

Dr Christopher Dye, the director of strategy in the office of the director general, told the BBC News website: "The incidence is pretty clearly going down in all three countries now.

"Each of the last three weeks has been the most promising we've seen so far, the message is reductions in all places.

"I would have identified the turning point as the beginning of the decline, first in Liberia and then later in Sierra Leone and Guinea."

Resurgence

However, he argued there was "no basis for complacency" due to the risk of a resurgence in cases.

It is also uncertain whether the downward trends will continue unless there are improvements in "contact tracing".

A single case is enough to start an entire outbreak so identifying everyone who comes into contact with Ebola is vital.

Yet the latest WHO situation report says the number of people being traced "remains lower than expected in many districts".

Dr Dye added: "Contact tracing to find every last case needs to be intensified and we need all guns blazing on all fronts."

Western Sierra Leone remains another problem.

Of the 145 cases reported across all affected countries last week, more than 100 were in that region, which includes the capital Freetown.

Speaking earlier this week, the UN system co-ordinator for Ebola, David Nabarro, said: "We have a very attractive and promising situation that leads us to believe that perhaps we are beginning to see the end of the outbreak.

"Unfortunately it's not quite as simple and the reason for that is any case of Ebola in the region can restart an outbreak very quickly."

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

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  posted on 3/6/2015 at 11:06 AM
http://www.houghtonstar.com/2015/03/06/ebola-cases-decline-in-africa/

Ebola Cases Decline in Africa

Posted by Melissa Maclean March 6, 2015


According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Ebola virus disease, formally known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, has taken approximately 9,700 lives since the first outbreak in 2014. Due to the high mortality rate, it is now classified as a “Risk Group Four Pathogen,” in accordance with the WHO pathogenicity standards.

Ebola_Virus_(2) In regard to geography, the majority of cases are confined to countries in West Africa—namely Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea— with exceptions of a few minor cross-cultural outbreaks.

However, in recent news, reports are showing a drastic decline in case numbers. Last week, WHO reported only five new cases in Liberia. This improvement has led the government to reopen schools for the first time in months, according to CNN news.

But not all Liberians are keen this immediate step towards “recovery,” and instead deem it as merely fostering a “relapse.”

To get a better understanding of this discrepancy, a personal interview was held last week with Liberia-stationed worker, Armando Costabile, to get a first-hand insight on the problem.

Costabile stated how he fears that the reopening of schools may have some adverse effects on the country. Moreover, he believes safety and caution should come first.

“While the thought of reopening schools appears as a positive landmark, I am weary of the backfire it could have, being this soon.”

Costabile continued his statement by referring to the “cycle of disease” he has witnessed over the years, “Ebola is not new to the Liberians. Outbreaks have occurred in cycles for over a decade.”

He further described the framework of this ‘disease cycle’ in his next statement, “A disease hits, people go into panic, help comes, the hype dwindles down, and people go right back to unsafe contact as if it did not happen.”

While Costabile claimed there are multiple factors playing into this problem, he subsequently highlighted the issue of culture,“I think one of the problems lies with cultural mindsets. This is a culture that lives the moment. While this has great aspects to it, it can often lead to forgetting everything of the past a little too quickly…”

Melissa MacLean GreyCostabile also described the issue with quarantines, and how there are “always one or two tribesmen who were missed and retreat to the bush.” Thus, the cultivation for a relapse begins. In other words, the disease “hides for a few years in the Bush, slowly leaks back into the city, and eventually outbreaks once again.” He states that it is the “nature of a virus.”

On a brighter note, in comparison to past outbreaks, Costabile is a little more hopeful this time with the new enactment of U.S. screenings. According to Costabile, this is the “most orderly and effective screening” he has ever witnessed.

Additionally, on February 8, 2015, WHO released another statement with news of a projected mass vaccination to counteract the crisis. Though the program is currently undergoing clinical trials, it is said that it will be fully decided on in August of this year.

Costabile is set to return to Liberia within the next month. Follow up interviews will be conducted to chart the progress, and/or demise. Only time will tell if the Ebola virus is truly concluding its existence.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

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  posted on 3/6/2015 at 11:22 AM
So should we allow flights yet or should our borders still be shut down?
 

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  posted on 3/23/2015 at 08:04 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/health-32009508

23 March 2015 Last updated at 07:35 ET
Ebola outbreak 'over by August', UN suggests
By Smitha Mundasad
Health reporter, BBC News

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa will be over by August, the head of the UN Ebola mission has told the BBC.

Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed admitted the UN had made mistakes in handling the crisis early on, sometimes acting "arrogantly".

A year after the outbreak was officially declared, the virus has killed more than 10,000 people.

The medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres says a "global coalition of inaction" led to tragic consequences.

Looking back over the year, the charity suggests its early calls for help were ignored by local governments and the World Health Organization.

Most deaths occurred in the worst-affected countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The head of the UN Ebola response mission told the BBC, when the virus first struck, "there was probably a lack of knowledge and there was a certain degree of arrogance, but I think we are learning lessons.

"We have been running away from giving any specific date, but I am pretty sure myself that it will be gone by the summer."

'Turned away'

The first person to succumb to the disease during this outbreak is thought to have been a toddler in a remote part of Guinea. He died in December 2013.

Three months later the WHO officially announced an outbreak. And it was a further five months before the organisation declared it a public health emergency of international concern. At this point more than 1,000 people had lost their lives.

Henry Gray, MSF emergency coordinator, told the BBC: "We were well aware this was something different in March and April last year and we did try to bring this to the attention of the WHO but also governments within the countries affected.

"And of course it was frustrating that we weren't heard and that has probably led to the scale of the epidemic we see today."

The charity says it should also have used more of its own resources earlier in the crisis.

The analysis, which includes dozens of interviews with MSF staff, says by the end of August 2014 treatment centres in Liberia where overwhelmed.

In January 2015 at a rare emergency meeting, the WHO admitted it was too late to respond.

Dr Margaret Chan, director general, said: "The world, including WHO, was too slow to see what was unfolding before us."

Continued threat
But the organisation says it made it clear from the start "this was a very serious situation".

There are now proposals to build-up a rapid response team to react more swiftly to future threats.

Case numbers are falling but MSF says the outbreak is not yet over. Overall cases have not declined significantly since January, the charity warns.



Liberia recorded its first case in more than two weeks on Friday, dashing hopes the country would soon be declared virus-free.

In Guinea, cases are rising again after a dip at the beginning of the year.

Some patients in Sierra Leone are are not on lists of known Ebola contacts, suggesting chains of spread are going undetected.

Dr Derek Gatherer, at Lancaster University, said: "In retrospect, it is now apparent that the delay from December to March was crucial in the dissemination of the virus to several locations in eastern Guinea and then onto the capital, Conakry, which remains one of the few areas with active transmission."

But until zero cases are recorded in all three worst-affected countries for a period of at least six weeks, the outbreak will not be officially declared over.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

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  posted on 3/26/2015 at 06:29 PM
http://www.howardwfrench.com/2015/03/how-does-africa-get-reported-a-letter- of-concern-to-60-minutes/

How Does Africa Get Reported? A Letter Of Concern To 60 Minutes.
Posted March 25, 2015

March 25, 2015

Jeff Fager, Executive Producer, CBS 60 Minutes (by email)

Dear Mr. Fager,

We, the undersigned, are writing to express our grave concern about the frequent and recurring misrepresentation of the African continent by 60 Minutes.

In a series of recent segments from the continent, 60 Minutes has managed, quite extraordinarily, to render people of black African ancestry voiceless and all but invisible.

Two of these segments were remarkably similar in their basic subject matter, featuring white people who have made it their mission to rescue African wildlife. In one case these were lions, and in another, apes. People of black African descent make no substantial appearance in either of these reports, and no sense whatsoever is given of the countries visited, South Africa and Gabon.

The third notable recent segment was a visit by your correspondent Lara Logan to Liberia to cover the Ebola epidemic in that country. In that broadcast, Africans were reduced to the role of silent victims. They constituted what might be called a scenery of misery: people whose thoughts, experiences and actions were treated as if totally without interest. Liberians were shown within easy speaking range of Logan, including some Liberians whom she spoke about, and yet not a single Liberian was quoted in any capacity.

Liberians not only died from Ebola, but many of them contributed bravely to the fight against the disease, including doctors, nurses and other caregivers, some of whom gave their lives in this effort. Despite this, the only people heard from on the air were white foreigners who had come to Liberia to contribute to the fight against the disease.

Taken together, this anachronistic style of coverage reproduces, in condensed form, many of the worst habits of modern American journalism on the subject of Africa. To be clear, this means that Africa only warrants the public’s attention when there is disaster or human tragedy on an immense scale, when Westerners can be elevated to the role of central characters, or when it is a matter of that perennial favorite, wildlife. As a corollary, Africans themselves are typically limited to the role of passive victims, or occasionally brutal or corrupt villains and incompetents; they are not otherwise shown to have any agency or even the normal range of human thoughts and emotions. Such a skewed perspective not only disserves Africa, it also badly disserves the news viewing and news reading public.

We have taken the initiative of writing to you because we are mindful of the reach of 60 Minutes, and of the important role that your program has long played in informing the public. We are equally mindful that American views of Africa, a continent of 1.1 billion people, which is experiencing rapid change on an immense scale, are badly misinformed by much of the mainstream media. The great diversity of African experience, the challenges and triumphs of African peoples, and above all, the voices and thoughts of Africans themselves are chronically and woefully underrepresented.

Over the coming decades, Africa will become the backdrop of some of the most significant developments on the planet, from unprecedented population growth, urbanization and economic change to, potentially, the wholesale reconfiguration of states. We would like see to 60 Minutes rethink its approach to Africa, and rise to the challenge of covering topics like these, and many more, that go well beyond the bailiwick of the staid and stereotypical recent examples cited above. In doing so, 60 Minutes will have much to gain, as will the viewing public.

Howard W. French

Associate Professor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Author of China’s Second Continent and A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

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  posted on 5/7/2015 at 04:26 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/08/health/weeks-after-his-recovery-ebola-lur ked-in-a-doctors-eye.html?_r=0

Weeks After His Recovery, Ebola Lurked in a Doctor’s Eye
By DENISE GRADY MAY 7, 2015

ATLANTA — When he was released from Emory University Hospital in October after a long, brutal fight with Ebola that nearly ended his life, Dr. Ian Crozier’s medical team thought he was cured. But less than two months later, he was back at the hospital with fading sight, intense pain and soaring pressure in his left eye.

Test results were chilling: The inside of Dr. Crozier’s eye was teeming with Ebola.

His doctors were amazed. They had considered the possibility that the virus had invaded his eye, but they had not really expected to find it. Months had passed since Dr. Crozier became ill while working in an Ebola treatment ward in Sierra Leone as a volunteer for the World Health Organization. By the time he left Emory, his blood was Ebola-free. Although the virus may persist in semen for months, other body fluids were thought to be clear of it once a patient recovered. Almost nothing was known about the ability of Ebola to lurk inside the eye.

Despite the infection within his eye, Dr. Crozier’s tears and the surface of his eye were virus-free, so he posed no risk to anyone who had casual contact with him.

More than a year after the epidemic in West Africa was recognized, doctors are still learning about the course of the disease and its lingering effects on survivors. Information about the aftermath of Ebola has been limited because past outbreaks were small: no more than a few hundred cases, often with death rates of 50 percent to 80 percent. But now, with at least 10,000 survivors in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, patterns are emerging.

Dr. Crozier, 44, ruefully calls himself a poster child for “post-Ebola syndrome”: Besides eye trouble, he has had debilitating joint and muscle pain, deep fatigue and hearing loss. Similar problems are being reported in West Africa, but it is not clear how common, severe or persistent they are. There have even been reports of survivors left completely blind or deaf, but these accounts are anecdotal and unconfirmed.

Doctors say the eye problems, because they threaten sight, are the most worrisome part of the syndrome and most urgently need attention. Dr. Crozier’s condition, uveitis — a dangerous inflammation inside the eye — has also been diagnosed in West Africans who survived Ebola.

At the height of the epidemic, health workers were too overwhelmed with the sick to worry much about survivors. But as the outbreak wanes, the World Health Organization has begun to gather information to help those who have not fully recovered, said Dr. Daniel Bausch, a senior consultant to the W.H.O. and an infectious-disease specialist at Tulane University. He added that the reports of eye trouble were of particular concern.

“It’s a major thing we need to study and provide support for,” Dr. Bausch said. But there are hardly any ophthalmologists in West Africa, and only they have the skills and equipment to diagnose conditions like uveitis that affect the inner chambers of the eye.

At ELWA Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia, run by the missionary group SIM, Dr. John Fankhauser, the medical director, said chronic pain, headaches and eye trouble were the most common physical problems among the hundred or so people attending a special clinic for Ebola survivors. Some have such severe pain that they find it hard to walk, he said. About 40 percent have eye pain, inflammation, blurred vision and blind spots in their visual fields. Some have uveitis.

“We’re seeing symptoms in patients who’ve been out of the treatment unit for up to nine months,” Dr. Fankhauser said. “They’re still very severe and impacting their life every day.” These patients will need medical care for months and maybe years, he predicted.

Dr. Fankhauser said he hoped that specialists in ophthalmology, rheumatology and rehabilitation medicine would visit.

“If they see enough patients, they can help us with the trends of what they are seeing, and that may help direct some of our therapy in the future, even after the team’s gone,” he said.

In Sierra Leone, the picture is much the same, according to Dr. John S. Schieffelin, a physician from the Tulane University School of Medicine who volunteered there. He said a strong, well-organized survivor group met regularly in Kenema.

“The main problems they’re telling me about are lots of body and joint pains, chronic headaches and women who stopped having menstrual periods, and for some it’s been several months,” Dr. Schieffelin said. “There’s quite a bit of vision problems.”

He added, “I have met one former patient that does appear to be deaf.”

The hearing loss could result from brain inflammation or very low blood pressure for an extended period, both caused by Ebola, Dr. Schieffelin said.

When Dr. Crozier’s eye trouble began, he and the Emory team suspected that Ebola had weakened his immune system and left him vulnerable to some other virus that had invaded his eye, maybe one that would be treatable with an antiviral drug.

So Dr. Steven Yeh, an ophthalmologist, pierced Dr. Crozier’s eye with a hair-thin needle, drew a few drops of fluid from its inner chamber and sent them to the lab. The results came as a shock.

For Dr. Crozier, it was deeply unsettling to learn that he was still occupied by something that seemed alien and malevolent. “It felt almost personal that the virus could be in my eye without me knowing it,” he said.

Uveitis had been reported in some Ebola survivors from previous outbreaks, and a related virus, Marburg, had been recovered from one patient’s eye. But those cases had seemed uncommon.

A report about Dr. Crozier’s eye condition was published on Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine.

The inside of the eye is mostly shielded from the immune system to prevent inflammation that could damage vision. The barriers are not fully understood, but they include tightly packed cells in minute blood vessels that keep out certain cells and molecules, along with unique biological properties that inhibit the immune system. But this protection, called immune privilege, can sometimes turn the inner eye into a sanctuary for viruses, where they can replicate unchecked. The testes are also immune-privileged, which is why Ebola can persist in semen for months.

Finding Ebola in Dr. Crozier’s eye threw his doctors off balance. Dr. Yeh had worn a protective gown and one pair of gloves but no mask when he drew the fluid. Doctors wear more protective gear when treating patients known to have Ebola. He could not rule out the possibility that he had been infected, so he slept in the guest room at home and avoided touching his infant son for three weeks, the incubation period of the disease.

Another concern was the examining room where Dr. Yeh had taken the fluid sample. As soon as they got the results, he and several Emory colleagues rushed back there, verified that no one else had used the room, and disinfected every surface.

Additional tests showed that Dr. Crozier’s tears and the outer surface of his eye were Ebola-free, so he posed no danger to others. But his case suggests that doctors performing eye surgery on Ebola survivors could be at risk. It is not known how long the virus can persist within the eye.

The big question was whether the doctors could save Dr. Crozier’s sight. They worried about both eyes, because ailments in one eye can sometimes spread to the other. But there was no antiviral drug proven to work against Ebola, and even if there were, there was no precedent for treating an eye full of the virus.

In addition, the severe inflammation suggested that the barriers that normally protect the eye from the immune system had been breached. So what was damaging Dr. Crozier’s eye? The virus, the inflammation or both? They could not be sure.

The usual treatment for inflammation is steroids. But they can make an infection worse.

“What if it unleashed the virus?” Dr. Crozier said. “We were on a tightrope.”

Maybe an experimental antiviral drug would help, the doctors thought.

Though Dr. Crozier was the patient, he was also part of his own medical team, and his focus on the scientific details helped counter his mounting fear that he was going blind.

As he and his physicians struggled to balance treating the inflammation with fighting the infection, his eyesight continued to deteriorate. They tried high doses of a steroid, prednisone. The drug caused mood swings like a teenager’s, ravenous hunger, weight gain, high blood pressure and insomnia. And still his sight worsened. It was like looking through brambles, he said. He reached a point where all he could see was movement when Dr. Yeh waggled his fingers.

He also had significant hearing loss on the same side. “The whole left side of your life is gone,” he said. “It was a very dark and depressing time.”

He spent Christmas in the hospital with his younger brother Mark, who had stayed with him constantly throughout his illness and recovery.

The pressure inside his eye, which had been dangerously elevated, began to drop — too much. The eye became doughy to the touch, as if it were turning to mush.

“The eye felt dead to me,” Dr. Crozier said.

The biggest shock came one morning about 10 days after his symptoms started, when he glanced in the mirror and saw that his eye had actually changed color. His iris, normally bright blue, had turned a vivid green. Rarely, severe viral infections can cause such a color change, and it is usually permanent.

“It was like an assault,” he said. “It was so personal.”

As the days passed with no sign of improvement, Dr. Crozier and the Emory team began to think he had little to lose. Dr. Jay Varkey, an infectious-disease specialist who had handled much of Dr. Crozier’s care, got special permission from the Food and Drug Administration to use an experimental antiviral drug taken in pill form. (The doctors declined to name it, preferring to save that information for future publication in a medical journal.) They were not even sure that the drug would find its way into Dr. Crozier’s eye.

To add to the treatment for inflammation, Dr. Yeh also gave Dr. Crozier a steroid injection above his eyeball that would slowly release the drug into his eye.

At first, there seemed to be no effect. But one morning a week or so later, Dr. Crozier realized that if he turned his head this way and that, he could find “portals” and “wormholes” through the obstructions in his eye and could see his brother Mark, who was sitting on the end of his bed.

Gradually, over the next few months, his sight returned. Surprisingly, his eye turned blue again. A video shows him excitedly calling out letters on an eye chart as he works his way down to smaller and smaller type, with his brother and the doctors standing by, laughing.

Was it the antiviral drug? He cannot be sure, but he thinks so.

“I think the cure was Ian’s own immune system,” Dr. Varkey said, explaining that he suspected the treatments had reduced Dr. Crozier’s symptoms and helped preserve his sight long enough for his immune system to kick in and clear out the virus — just as supportive care during the worst phase of his initial illness had kept him alive until his natural defenses could take over.

Dr. Crozier believes information from his case may help prevent blindness in Ebola survivors in West Africa. On April 9, he headed to Liberia with Dr. Yeh and several other Emory physicians to see patients who had recovered from Ebola and examine their eyes.

“Maybe we can change the natural history of the disease for survivors,” Dr. Crozier said. “I want to start that conversation.”

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

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  posted on 5/9/2015 at 06:51 AM
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-32671520

Liberia declared Ebola-free after weeks of no cases

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

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  posted on 6/11/2015 at 09:22 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/11/health/who-ebola-cases/index.html

Dozens of new Ebola cases reported in West Africa
By Catherine E. Shoichet, CNN
Updated 7:46 PM ET, Thu June 11, 2015

(CNN)It seemed like the number of people contracting Ebola in West Africa was on the decline. But now, officials say that trend has stalled, with dozens of new cases of the deadly virus reported so far this month.

Last week, there were 31 new cases of Ebola reported in a growing geographic area in Guinea and Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization said. At the beginning of this week, 14 additional cases were reported.

The latest figures mark the second straight week that the number of Ebola cases in West Africa has increased, officials said.

Investigators are working to trace how the latest cases of the disease were contracted, the WHO said.

"The outbreak is not over and the response efforts must be sustained until we get to zero cases throughout the region and are able to stay at zero for several months," the U.N. Mission for Ebola Emergency Response said Thursday.

Last month, officials from the WHO declared Liberia free of the disease. But even as they trumpeted the news, officials warned that outbreaks in Guinea and Sierra Leone ran the risk of bringing the virus back to Liberia, where more than 4,000 people died after contracting Ebola.

CNN's Debra Goldschmidt and Azadeh Ansari contributed to this report.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 10/7/2015 at 04:58 PM
http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-34471234

Ebola countries record first week with no new cases

The three West African countries at the heart of the Ebola epidemic recorded their first week with no new cases since the outbreak began in March 2014.
The outbreak has so far killed more than 11,000 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).
New cases have fallen sharply in 2015, but the WHO has warned that the disease could break out again.
The epidemic is the worst known occurrence of Ebola in history.
More than 500 people believed to have had dangerous contact with an Ebola patient remain under follow-up in Guinea, the WHO said in a report.
It also said several "high-risk" people linked to recent patients in Guinea and Sierra Leone had been lost track of.
Liberia has already been declared free of the disease after 42 days without a new case. It is the second time the country received the declaration, following a flare-up in June.
Sierra Leone released its last known Ebola patients on 28 September and must now wait to be declared free of the disease.
Guinea's most recent cases were recorded on 27 September.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 11/6/2015 at 08:43 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/07/world/africa/the-last-place-on-earth-with -ebola-guineas-fight-to-get-to-zero.html?_r=0

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 5/12/2017 at 09:36 AM
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/new-ebola-drc-one-dead_us_5915bd0be4b00 f308cf4acf9?3o&ncid=inblnkushpmg00000009

At Least 1 Person Dead From New Ebola Outbreak In Democratic Republic Of Congo
A total of nine cases have been reported in the country so far.

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 5/20/2018 at 02:20 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/18/world/africa/who-ebola-outbreak.html

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 8/24/2018 at 11:17 PM
https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ebola-outbreak-congo-health-care-worke rs_us_5b7f0b56e4b0348585fecab5

 

____________________
Flies all green 'n buzzin' in his dungeon of despair
Who are all those people that he's locked away up there
Are they crazy?,
Are they sainted?
Are they zeros someone painted?,
It has never been explained since at first it was created

 
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