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Author: Subject: great essay on Van Halen

World Class Peach





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  posted on 1/16/2013 at 08:04 PM
http://www.avclub.com/articles/the-uneven-alchemy-of-van-halens-runnin-with -the-d,90900/

The Uneven Alchemy of Van Halen’s “Runnin’ With The Devil”

Whoever said a chain is only as strong as its weakest link never listened to Van Halen. From a strictly technical standpoint, David Lee Roth is one of the **** tiest singers to ever clutch a microphone: screeching, squawking, croaking, honking, and bordering on tone-deafness. Granted, rock doesn’t demand virtuosity. But Roth’s lack of chops is made even more glaring by a stark contrast: His crumpled saxophone of a voice is pitted against the sleek eloquence and elegance of Eddie Van Halen’s guitar. It shouldn’t have worked. It totally did. And that uneven alchemy was already established by the 1978 release of VH’s debut, Van Halen—as well as the album’s first original hit song, “Runnin’ With The Devil.”

VH’s opening shot in its bid for world domination was a cover song. A faithful rendition of The Kinks’ “You Really Got Me” came out as a single just prior to “Runnin’ With The Devil.” It was a smart move. Simple, sturdy, and universally familiar, the melody of “You Really Got Me” challenged neither Roth nor his potential audience. “Runnin’ With The Devil” is a different matter. If radio listeners were led to believe that all of Van Halen might be a cheery, cheeky ’60s throwback, their ears were soon disabused of that notion. And abused by Roth.

That’s not to say “Runnin’ With The Devil” is in any way abrasive. That said, it’s no “You Really Got Me.” Leering, menacing, and lasciviously playful, the throb of the opening bassline telegraphs hellish darkness to come. Instead, it’s Roth. As Van Halen’s sinuous riffage unfurls, his prancing, preening counterpart beings to wail. And whoop. And whine. And perhaps woof. Caught in mid-barf, Roth pushes his bestial bark to something unrecognizably tuneless.

The ultimate expression of Roth’s narcissistic caterwauling was put on display a few years ago, when a track of his vocals for “Runnin’ With The Devil”—sans Van Halen’s fluid, melodic guitar—was posted on the Internet. Such examples of disembodied vocals, particularly of well-known songs, can be jarring upon first listen. But there’s something spectacularly lousy about Roth’s unaccompanied vocals for “Runnin’.” Without the song’s title being chanted hypnotically in the background, there’s no harmonic tether, nothing to hold onto. Just Roth in all his naked glory. It’s like seeing Superman with his tights around his ankles, the emperor strutting around with no clothes. And a hard-on. Instead of coming across like the world-class singer of a world-class band, Roth is a drunken aerobics instructor who stumbles into a karaoke bar after a long night of moonlighting as a porn star.

Which, naturally, is why Roth is a genius. Without him, VH wouldn’t have that X-factor, that wild card, that musky bouquet of chaos. The bland, post-Roth incarnations of VH have proven this. Never in a million years would anyone expect Eddie Van Halen to fly off his fretboard and start foaming at the fingers. But Roth? That dude is batshit. There are lyrics to “Runnin’ With The Devil,” but to Roth, they’re about as necessary as a melody. The gist of his words are focused on four basic facts:
1.He “live[s] his life like there’s no tomorrow.”
2.His fledgling career as a touring musician has already taught him that “the simple life ain’t so simple.”
3.He is now, in some undefined and perhaps indefinable way, “runnin’ with the devil.”
4.He’s gonna tell ya all about it.

In other words, he’s pretty much an idiot. Or rather, he’s auditioning for the part of rock’s reigning idiot savant. Too impetuous to wait for a callback, he just went ahead and gave himself the role. You may genuflect now. But Roth is as much of a court jester as he is a benevolent tyrant, and therein lies the root of his chummy megalomania. Circa 1978, hard rock was still the province of demigods like Robert Plant. Punk was exploding—down the block in VH’s hometown of L.A., in fact—but it hadn’t touched the mainstream in any real way. That said, Roth cannily locked onto the idea that having some sort of everyman quality might lighten Van Halen’s rocket-science level of instrumental perfection.

In his book Rock And The Pop Narcotic, curmudgeonly critic Joe Carducci refers to Eddie Van Halen’s pathological expertise on the guitar as “technosis”—and the innovative tapping technique he helped popularize as “insensate fret math.” Roth and math, on the other hand, have never been mentioned in the same sentence. Split the difference, and there’s “Runnin’ With The Devil”—an anthem that appeals to music geeks, dumbfucks, and just about everyone who can appreciate the unintentional image of a spandex-wearing Roth jogging alongside Satan. While Van Halen applies thermodynamics to his rhythm playing and astrophysics to his leads, Roth is a god gone goofy, the anti-Plant, a deity fallen to Earth and probably onto your couch.

That egalitarianism didn’t fool everyone, especially not the nascent population of Metalhead, U.S.A. As Carducci goes on to state:


“Van Halen debunked the idea that all metal was heavy and therefore doomed to glower from the lower end of the charts… In doing so they unleashed an avalanche of show-metal bands that on average weigh in somewhere between The Turtles and The 1910 Fruitgum Company.”

Today, it’s commonly accepted that VH is more of a hard-rock party band than a metal titan. In 1978, though, those lines had yet to be clearly drawn. That lack of a clear distinction set a precedent, one that Carducci correctly calls the root of ’80s pop-metal, for better and worse. Before the release of Van Halen, American metal was an ominous and mostly underground phenomenon, the accumulated ill will of a generation of pimply, denim-clad miscreants; afterward, metal began to metastasize. Kiss had already begun that process, and it’s no coincidence that Gene Simmons produced VH’s first demo in 1976, a session that included a raw, streamlined, more urgent version of “Runnin’ With The Devil.” While not radically different, that version is enough to paint a picture of a parallel universe: one in which metal never crossed over, VH never became popular, and Roth never had the chance to let his cockiness outgrow his talent.

That parallel universe must be a boring one. For all the missteps VH later took—even during Roth’s tenure at the helm—the volatile formula of the original lineup remained. By Roth’s final album with the group, the omni-successful 1984, Van Halen veered toward synthesizers and symphonic pomp; meanwhile, Roth got frothier. And Rothier. That’s not the kind of chemistry that any sane group of people can sustain, which is partly why VH’s reunion album, 2012’s A Different Kind Of Truth, was doomed to mediocrity. But it doesn’t matter. As long as “Runnin’ With The Devil” remains, it’s easy to turn back the clock and imagine that the hard-partying, brightly burning, cruddy-voiced Roth truly had no tomorrow.

 
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  posted on 1/16/2013 at 08:26 PM
Decent essay. I think A Different Kind Of Truth is brilliant, unfortunately it's not quite made for these times. It would have fit in famously with Van Halens classic six- pack.

David Lee Roth is brilliant to me, period! No explanation needed. His lyrical timing is genius. His scat and Al Jolson persona lends something to this rock and roll band that is truly original. What a showman! I can only place Mick Jagger above him as a showman.....if even him! Early in his career, I think that he's underrated as a singer.

My thoughts.

 

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  posted on 1/16/2013 at 08:33 PM
back in the day VH really kicked some azz,1st concert I ever went to $6.00,VH-II TOUR,They all were monsters
 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 06:49 AM
DLR rocks.

Period

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 07:40 AM
quote:
Decent essay. I think A Different Kind Of Truth is brilliant, unfortunately it's not quite made for these times. It would have fit in famously with Van Halens classic six- pack.

David Lee Roth is brilliant to me, period! No explanation needed. His lyrical timing is genius. His scat and Al Jolson persona lends something to this rock and roll band that is truly original. What a showman! I can only place Mick Jagger above him as a showman.....if even him! Early in his career, I think that he's underrated as a singer.

My thoughts.



Well put my friend.

I guess anyone with a computer and a opinion can post anything they like. Not saying he is totally right or wrong though....

Not sure if I would be that harsh on DLR. I do agree he may not have the greatest singing ability, but I think he is adequate and did the job well for that band.

My opinion is Roth is just as equally important to the original VH sound as anyone else in that band, and has proved it. Listening to A Different Kinda of Truth just verifies it to me.
Thats VH and thats why DLR is the vocalist. The Sammy stuff was good, but when A Different Kinda Truth came out...oh yeah....thats the VH...it reminded and reaffirmed the fact that Roth in the band gives it that true VH feel.

I thought about starting a post about they're latest and revisting it. I know it's only been about a year, but I think sometimes after you listen to something after not hearing it for awhile you might appreciate it more, get a different perspective, hear it differently and really see how good it is. It came out last Feb and I had it playing pretty solid for a couple of months. Summer rolled around and just started listening to other stuff and so forth.
Late this fall I grabbed it again and gave it some spins in the car. It's some good stuff.
Mentioned in the post that I quoted "unfortunately it's not quite made for these times"is true. I think certain styles of rock music have they're hey day and VH's and that genres is gone for the most part. They still have the fans and so forth, but ruling the world will not happen like it did 20 plus years ago. I think its very good and true VH music
and I would like to hear more, but who knows if that will happen. If nothing else ever surfaces from these guys, thats fine. They proved why the were the kings at a time and gave us one more listen that I feel is very worth your while.

DLR soundboards
http://www.realmofdarkness.net/pc/dlr-sb?wwparam=1358426254


[Edited on 1/17/2013 by jszfunk]

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 08:07 AM
So one can glean from this stellar work that the writer thinks DLR is 50% horrible singer and 50% ass-clown. Unfortunately, he cannot argue with VH success or popularity which he must grudgingly accept as he pens his critique thinking, I am so much more sophisticated than all these dumb **** VH fans.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 09:28 AM
It is a pretty funny listen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IArxakPsPE0

There is no one like DLR.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 12:01 PM
quote:
The ultimate expression of Roth’s narcissistic caterwauling was put on display a few years ago, when a track of his vocals for “Runnin’ With The Devil”—sans Van Halen’s fluid, melodic guitar—was posted on the Internet. Such examples of disembodied vocals, particularly of well-known songs, can be jarring upon first listen. But there’s something spectacularly lousy about Roth’s unaccompanied vocals for “Runnin’.” Without the song’s title being chanted hypnotically in the background, there’s no harmonic tether, nothing to hold onto. Just Roth in all his naked glory. It’s like seeing Superman with his tights around his ankles, the emperor strutting around with no clothes. And a hard-on. Instead of coming across like the world-class singer of a world-class band, Roth is a drunken aerobics instructor who stumbles into a karaoke bar after a long night of moonlighting as a porn star.


I laughed hysterically at really pretty much all of this paragraph....and I actually LOVE the song in question. This is just too damn funny!!

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 12:15 PM
I have a theory folks

The writer was at his parents home for the holidays and over Christmas dinner, he discovered that his mother had been one of those kind of 80's girls after some livid conversations between drunk female siblings and cousins.

The writer "wondered" if maybe DLR had "slid into home base" with his mom back when and could maybe be his actual father ? Afterall, it was common knowldge that his mom's husband wasn't his "real" father. The topic never went further than it was merely a college fling.

So after the DNA test didn't pan out and the writer had to actually work for a living instead of taking that place beside that "almost his daddy", he wrote thie above article.
Afterall, the way he described DLR in such a personal manner. His mom had to have told him a story or two. The guy seems way to vindictive to have been so creative without a lil bit of inside and/or personal knowledge.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 12:22 PM


quote:
I thought about starting a post about they're latest and revisting it. I know it's only been about a year, but I think sometimes after you listen to something after not hearing it for awhile you might appreciate it more, get a different perspective, hear it differently and really see how good it is. It came out last Feb and I had it playing pretty solid for a couple of months. Summer rolled around and just started listening to other stuff and so forth.
Late this fall I grabbed it again and gave it some spins in the car. It's some good stuff.
Mentioned in the post that I quoted "unfortunately it's not quite made for these times"is true. I think certain styles of rock music have they're hey day and VH's and that genres is gone for the most part. They still have the fans and so forth, but ruling the world will not happen like it did 20 plus years ago. I think its very good and true VH music
and I would like to hear more, but who knows if that will happen. If nothing else ever surfaces from these guys, thats fine. They proved why the were the kings at a time and gave us one more listen that I feel is very worth your while.

DLR soundboards
http://www.realmofdarkness.net/pc/dlr-sb?wwparam=1358426254


[Edited on 1/17/2013 by jszfunk]


You cannot be more right about this record! I understated previously, my love for the album. To me it sounds better now, nearly one year removed.

It must be said that ( the author seems to miss) the melodies of the classic VH tunes are largely the work of Roth. He is not just a lyricist. The friction between he and Eddie has always made Eddie that much better. For me when Roth struts out onstage, I instantly realize this is what "Rockstar" means!

I am hearing that there will be new material released in the future. Eddie wanted a double LP, but DLR, ever the brilliant marketing man, convinced Ed to hold off for another release. We'll see.

BTW, I have an 18 x 12 framed photo of that shot you attached, hanging in my "music listening" room.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 12:32 PM
Growing up in So. Calif. Van Halen was our band ! Shame I was a couple years to young to be a part of the scene when they were coming up. Did my first shows on the scene in 1979 and they were already huge.

I havn't listened to the recent album in months. When I get off my Stones vinyl binge sometime today, I'll give it a spin.

The thing that makes me wonder is whether the writer was being serious or trying to be funny. Maybe both ?

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 12:58 PM
I dunno, this appears to be a half-azz effort trying to be cleverly insightful, regarding something that was pretty much taken granted by most music fans.

I never thought VH was "metal", I considered them just carrying on what Montrose had started, a hard rockin' party hearty band from California with a sh*t hot guitar player.

Even DLR himself mentioned in interviews that all he did was take the "monkeyshines" act he did as a kid for family and turned it into a lucrative career.

I think the fella that wrote this was overthinking it way too hard heading in the wrong direction.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 01:16 PM
I found the piece nothing more than satire on a band that, at the time they were moving up in the world of rock the world of rock was in flux, punk and new wave were coming on strong and a band like VH was a new breath of fresh air in so much as what was on the horizon. By the time they walked away after 1984 the music scene was lost in poppy crap and new wave synth that to this day I still don't get. What they did after that I never really had much interest in as they too sold out to make a living. They were a band of great players that actually could entertain audiences while blowing minds with great musicianship. Is Roth an egotistcal idiot sure, could he front a band and blow peoples minds on stage and off absolutley. I like any of my friends that went to VH shows did not go to hear DLR's incredible? vocal abilities, we were there for the complete unit. Eddies. amazing guitar prowess at the time, Alex's John Bonhamist pounding, and Michael Anthony's rhythm guitar bass lines. To this day I always thought Mike Anthony's voice was superior to DLR's but that didn't matter. Say what you will but for a period in time they were the biggest band on the planet and deservidly so. My 2 cents.............

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 01:22 PM
quote:
It is a pretty funny listen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IArxakPsPE0

There is no one like DLR.


Thanks needed the laugh

Haven't given the new album a full listen but all I can say is that the song Tattoo was really cheesy

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 01:41 PM
quote:
quote:
It is a pretty funny listen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IArxakPsPE0

There is no one like DLR.


Thanks needed the laugh

Haven't given the new album a full listen but all I can say is that the song Tattoo was really cheesy


Trust me and nearly a million others worldwide who bought the new album when we tell you that there's so much more than the tune "Tattoo" to listen to on this album. Many of the tunes will raise the fur on your arms. There's the quirky lyrics, masterful delivery, and amazing musical chops from all the Van Halen's on this album. Just give it a spin or two in its entirety. I'd say it's one of the best hard rock albums of the year.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 05:24 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
It is a pretty funny listen.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IArxakPsPE0

There is no one like DLR.


Thanks needed the laugh

Haven't given the new album a full listen but all I can say is that the song Tattoo was really cheesy


Trust me and nearly a million others worldwide who bought the new album when we tell you that there's so much more than the tune "Tattoo" to listen to on this album. Many of the tunes will raise the fur on your arms. There's the quirky lyrics, masterful delivery, and amazing musical chops from all the Van Halen's on this album. Just give it a spin or two in its entirety. I'd say it's one of the best hard rock albums of the year.


Yeah I kinda cringed when I heard first Tattoo... I can tolerate it a little more, but usually skip it.

I really like Honeybabysweetiedoll. It has some of that weirdness VH style that use to pop up on some of the early stuff every now and then that I love. It has a sinsiter feel to it also and it just plain flat out kicks butt.

Van Halen- honeybabysweetiedoll
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hLqPObiutWY

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 05:31 PM
quote:


quote:
I thought about starting a post about they're latest and revisting it. I know it's only been about a year, but I think sometimes after you listen to something after not hearing it for awhile you might appreciate it more, get a different perspective, hear it differently and really see how good it is. It came out last Feb and I had it playing pretty solid for a couple of months. Summer rolled around and just started listening to other stuff and so forth.
Late this fall I grabbed it again and gave it some spins in the car. It's some good stuff.
Mentioned in the post that I quoted "unfortunately it's not quite made for these times"is true. I think certain styles of rock music have they're hey day and VH's and that genres is gone for the most part. They still have the fans and so forth, but ruling the world will not happen like it did 20 plus years ago. I think its very good and true VH music
and I would like to hear more, but who knows if that will happen. If nothing else ever surfaces from these guys, thats fine. They proved why the were the kings at a time and gave us one more listen that I feel is very worth your while.

DLR soundboards
http://www.realmofdarkness.net/pc/dlr-sb?wwparam=1358426254


[Edited on 1/17/2013 by jszfunk]


You cannot be more right about this record! I understated previously, my love for the album. To me it sounds better now, nearly one year removed.

It must be said that ( the author seems to miss) the melodies of the classic VH tunes are largely the work of Roth. He is not just a lyricist. The friction between he and Eddie has always made Eddie that much better. For me when Roth struts out onstage, I instantly realize this is what "Rockstar" means!

I am hearing that there will be new material released in the future. Eddie wanted a double LP, but DLR, ever the brilliant marketing man, convinced Ed to hold off for another release. We'll see.

BTW, I have an 18 x 12 framed photo of that shot you attached, hanging in my "music listening" room.


Yeah that is a great photo of DLR.
I use to be a VH freak back in the early 80's.
Use to have this poster, still wish I did.

 

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  posted on 1/17/2013 at 08:07 PM
Some wounded fans on this thread, yikes! That essay came from The Onion, which is a pop-culture humor site, all tongue-in-cheek.

The writer makes it pretty clear that he knows that VH with Dave were huge, he credits VH correctly for creating the blueprint for L.A. Hair Metal, and he declares that VH without Dave was not VH at all. What DLR fan would disagree with that?

He does slam Dave's voice and he calls Dave a clown prince. I suspect Dave would agree with both. I'm a huge Dave fan, and his fun autobiography (and plenty of his interviews) makes it clear that he sees himself as a showman, a party host, an entertainer, not the world's best singer.

His point was that the mix of Dave's raw voice and massive party personality was a remarkable contrast to Eddie's dazzling virtuosity, especially at that time. Think about it. When VH came out, they were definitely considered metal. I know that by the early 1980s, we had many subgenres of metal, but when VH made it big in 1978 with that first album and their opening slot for Black Sabbath, they were considered metal.

And in all of metal, there was nothing like the combo of Dave and Eddie. A metal frontman might be an operatic "metal god" like Rob Halford or Ronnie James Dio, or maybe a mystical cozmik kid like Robert Plant, or a tough guy like Bon Scott or Lemmy, but no one was a strutting peacock like Dave, quoting Oscar Wilde one moment, doing karate kicks the next, singing "Ice Cream Man" one moment and "Atomic Punk" the next. He was hoarsely shouting "show us your tits" while his guitarist was ushering in neo-classical shred guitar. Maybe Steve Tyler had come close to what Dave ended up doing ("Big Ten Inch" certainly pre-shadows Dave's schtick, and Dave also REALLY borrowed from Jim Dandy from Black Oak Arkansas), but Steve Tyler was in bad shape by the time VH was hitting it. VH did offer hard rock that you could dance to and that your girl might like, which Aerosmith had going for them also.

Now, whether I am listening to bootlegs from the 1970s or from VH's recent tour, I can't really say that Dave's voice was very good live. I realize that his show was of more importance than his singing, but the essay has a solid point when it says that Dave was often off key. He is very much like Mick Jagger in that regard. Mick was often singing flat and also utterly breathless from 1975 - 1981 with the Stones, but he was putting on a big show. Mick and Dave are both great stylists, though; they sing in cool and interesting ways, loads of vocal personality.

I went to see Dave solo twice when he had Vai, Sheehan, and Bisonette. Fantastic show. I saw VH around the same time and was rather disappointed, but I was never a Sammy fan. As a die-hard fan, it killed me that Van Hagar got bigger and bigger while Dave's career sputtered. I did not enjoy all of his solo stuff; he needed Eddie, and Eddie (to my ears) lost a lot without Dave.

I really liked the two songs that VH did with Dave on their greatest hits CD ("Me Wise Magic" and "Can't Get That Stuff"), but then I was completely knocked out by "A Different Kind of Truth." I was kind of surprised that it did not do better, but I guess I cannot think of any album by rockers over the age of 40 that has done very well in the past decade. I think "Big River" or "Blood and Fire" would have been better singles, though "Tattoo" did grow on me.

I agree with jszfunk that ADKOT had some of the old VH wierdness - "Women and Children First" and "Fair Warning" had some real rippers like "Loss of Control" and "One Foot Out The Door," and on the new album, songs like "Chinatown" and "Outta Space" had some of that same feel - this was not pop metal, this was heavy chaos.

Anyway, apologies if the Onion essay offended anyone. I got a real kick out of lines like "His crumpled saxophone of a voice is pitted against the sleek eloquence and elegance of Eddie Van Halen’s guitar. It shouldn’t have worked. It totally did." But I should have put a disclaimer on it.


 

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  posted on 1/18/2013 at 08:05 AM
quote:
Some wounded fans on this thread, yikes! That essay came from The Onion, which is a pop-culture humor site, all tongue-in-cheek.

The writer makes it pretty clear that he knows that VH with Dave were huge, he credits VH correctly for creating the blueprint for L.A. Hair Metal, and he declares that VH without Dave was not VH at all. What DLR fan would disagree with that?

He does slam Dave's voice and he calls Dave a clown prince. I suspect Dave would agree with both. I'm a huge Dave fan, and his fun autobiography (and plenty of his interviews) makes it clear that he sees himself as a showman, a party host, an entertainer, not the world's best singer.

His point was that the mix of Dave's raw voice and massive party personality was a remarkable contrast to Eddie's dazzling virtuosity, especially at that time. Think about it. When VH came out, they were definitely considered metal. I know that by the early 1980s, we had many subgenres of metal, but when VH made it big in 1978 with that first album and their opening slot for Black Sabbath, they were considered metal.

And in all of metal, there was nothing like the combo of Dave and Eddie. A metal frontman might be an operatic "metal god" like Rob Halford or Ronnie James Dio, or maybe a mystical cozmik kid like Robert Plant, or a tough guy like Bon Scott or Lemmy, but no one was a strutting peacock like Dave, quoting Oscar Wilde one moment, doing karate kicks the next, singing "Ice Cream Man" one moment and "Atomic Punk" the next. He was hoarsely shouting "show us your tits" while his guitarist was ushering in neo-classical shred guitar. Maybe Steve Tyler had come close to what Dave ended up doing ("Big Ten Inch" certainly pre-shadows Dave's schtick, and Dave also REALLY borrowed from Jim Dandy from Black Oak Arkansas), but Steve Tyler was in bad shape by the time VH was hitting it. VH did offer hard rock that you could dance to and that your girl might like, which Aerosmith had going for them also.

Now, whether I am listening to bootlegs from the 1970s or from VH's recent tour, I can't really say that Dave's voice was very good live. I realize that his show was of more importance than his singing, but the essay has a solid point when it says that Dave was often off key. He is very much like Mick Jagger in that regard. Mick was often singing flat and also utterly breathless from 1975 - 1981 with the Stones, but he was putting on a big show. Mick and Dave are both great stylists, though; they sing in cool and interesting ways, loads of vocal personality.

I went to see Dave solo twice when he had Vai, Sheehan, and Bisonette. Fantastic show. I saw VH around the same time and was rather disappointed, but I was never a Sammy fan. As a die-hard fan, it killed me that Van Hagar got bigger and bigger while Dave's career sputtered. I did not enjoy all of his solo stuff; he needed Eddie, and Eddie (to my ears) lost a lot without Dave.

I really liked the two songs that VH did with Dave on their greatest hits CD ("Me Wise Magic" and "Can't Get That Stuff"), but then I was completely knocked out by "A Different Kind of Truth." I was kind of surprised that it did not do better, but I guess I cannot think of any album by rockers over the age of 40 that has done very well in the past decade. I think "Big River" or "Blood and Fire" would have been better singles, though "Tattoo" did grow on me.

I agree with jszfunk that ADKOT had some of the old VH wierdness - "Women and Children First" and "Fair Warning" had some real rippers like "Loss of Control" and "One Foot Out The Door," and on the new album, songs like "Chinatown" and "Outta Space" had some of that same feel - this was not pop metal, this was heavy chaos.

Anyway, apologies if the Onion essay offended anyone. I got a real kick out of lines like "His crumpled saxophone of a voice is pitted against the sleek eloquence and elegance of Eddie Van Halen’s guitar. It shouldn’t have worked. It totally did." But I should have put a disclaimer on it.





Nah, did not offend me what so ever. I take opinons like that with a grain of salt. It was kinda of a funny read. Dave is show first and vocals later, but I dont think he is that bad of a singer. He served the band and music very well.

Yeah I agree when I heard Blood and Fire I thought that should have been a single.
It's a shame at times when music gets looked over because it sounds like it's from a different era, from elder musicians and artists or whats happening now . ADKOT is really good.

I know it's been said that these are tracks from the VH vault from years ago. It would be interesting to hear what they said like then to what they morphed into now.

[Edited on 1/18/2013 by jszfunk]

 

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Universal Peach



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  posted on 1/18/2013 at 09:31 AM
I should point out that ADKOT has sold almost a million copies. I'd say that is pretty successful for this day and age. Especially for a hard rock album that would have debuted at number one had not Adele won the Grammy the week before it hit the charts. Instead, it debuted at number 2 overall. Not too shabby for an act that hadn't released an album in 13 years. I don't know what it is, but Van Halen is still a juggernaut in the hard rock world all things considered. Rumor has it they have another album pretty much in the can from the same recording sessions that produced ADKOT.
 

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  posted on 1/18/2013 at 10:27 AM
quote:
quote:
The ultimate expression of Roth’s narcissistic caterwauling was put on display a few years ago, when a track of his vocals for “Runnin’ With The Devil”—sans Van Halen’s fluid, melodic guitar—was posted on the Internet. Such examples of disembodied vocals, particularly of well-known songs, can be jarring upon first listen. But there’s something spectacularly lousy about Roth’s unaccompanied vocals for “Runnin’.” Without the song’s title being chanted hypnotically in the background, there’s no harmonic tether, nothing to hold onto. Just Roth in all his naked glory. It’s like seeing Superman with his tights around his ankles, the emperor strutting around with no clothes. And a hard-on. Instead of coming across like the world-class singer of a world-class band, Roth is a drunken aerobics instructor who stumbles into a karaoke bar after a long night of moonlighting as a porn star.

I laughed hysterically at really pretty much all of this paragraph....and I actually LOVE the song in question. This is just too damn funny!!
Agreed, I thought it was hilarious, too, and I can see DLR as described above. He ain't the singer he once was (screech wise) but he can still sing. And there is no doubt, he is still a hell of a front man.

 

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  posted on 1/18/2013 at 07:37 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
The ultimate expression of Roth’s narcissistic caterwauling was put on display a few years ago, when a track of his vocals for “Runnin’ With The Devil”—sans Van Halen’s fluid, melodic guitar—was posted on the Internet. Such examples of disembodied vocals, particularly of well-known songs, can be jarring upon first listen. But there’s something spectacularly lousy about Roth’s unaccompanied vocals for “Runnin’.” Without the song’s title being chanted hypnotically in the background, there’s no harmonic tether, nothing to hold onto. Just Roth in all his naked glory. It’s like seeing Superman with his tights around his ankles, the emperor strutting around with no clothes. And a hard-on. Instead of coming across like the world-class singer of a world-class band, Roth is a drunken aerobics instructor who stumbles into a karaoke bar after a long night of moonlighting as a porn star.

I laughed hysterically at really pretty much all of this paragraph....and I actually LOVE the song in question. This is just too damn funny!!
Agreed, I thought it was hilarious, too, and I can see DLR as described above. He ain't the singer he once was (screech wise) but he can still sing. And there is no doubt, he is still a hell of a front man.


Absolutely, too damn funny. The most Interesting description of Roth I've heard in some time. I've never heard this version of which he speaks. Is it out there somewhere?

Good call on the tune Honeybabysweetydoll, and well said. It's got some classic VH flavors on it and I think the dark sort of vibe is very reminiscent of some of the tunes off "Fair Warning." At least to my ears anyway. Same with "She's The Woman."

[Edited on 1/19/2013 by Chain]

[Edited on 1/19/2013 by Chain]

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 1/18/2013 at 07:49 PM
"She's the Woman" joins "Blood and Fire" and "Big River" as The Big Three Songs That Should Have Been the Radio Singles Rather Than "Tattoo." Great song.
 

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  posted on 1/18/2013 at 07:54 PM
After the above post I listened to "Honeybabysweetiedoll" and was reminded just how f*cking bad @ss this tune is. Holy **** !!!! I haven't listened to this in sometime. Surprisingly, it sounds as good as the CD played through my home stereo on these mediocre computer speakers. Is this youtube clip some sort of different mix or release? Maybe pulled from the vynle version that supposedly sounds much, much better than the CD, MP3, etc.? Seriously, sounds great...I can hear Al's drums so much more but yet still be blown away by Ed and Wolf. The mix is just right.
 

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  posted on 1/18/2013 at 08:00 PM
quote:
"She's the Woman" joins "Blood and Fire" and "Big River" as The Big Three Songs That Should Have Been the Radio Singles Rather Than "Tattoo." Great song.


Good call....And you're totally right on the actual songs and their order of release. And perhaps released about 3 weeks later, to let Adele's Grammy win and incredible run possibly subside a bit more. I say that as a total arm chair quarterback. Besides, as a fan, I couldn't wait much longer.

 
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