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Author: Subject: Texas Jeans...100% Real USA Made

Zen Peach





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  posted on 12/2/2010 at 02:48 PM
http://www.texasjeansusa.com/texas.html

Has anyone tried these? I've worn Levi's my whole life, nothing else, even though I know we don't make 'em here anymore. But something I just read made me change my mind about Levi's:

quote:
This July, in a mating that had the relieved air of lovers who had too long resisted embracing, Levi Strauss rolled blue jeans into every Wal-Mart in the United States.


 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/2/2010 at 02:49 PM
I like the way they look...I wonder how they fit.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/2/2010 at 07:56 PM
Big box stores forced Levis in the early 2000's to lower their price to the point that they first moved their operations overseas, then they sold the rights to these companies to make their jeans.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/2/2010 at 08:39 PM
From this link bigann posted in another thread: http://www.fastcompany.com/magazine/77/walmart.html?page=0%2C0

This was written in 2003. I don't know what the situation is now.

quote:
This July, in a mating that had the relieved air of lovers who had too long resisted embracing, Levi Strauss rolled blue jeans into every Wal-Mart doorway in the United States: 2,864 stores. Wal-Mart, seeking to expand its clothing business with more fashionable brands, promoted the clothes on its in-store TV network and with banners slipped over the security-tag detectors at exit doors.

Levi's launch into Wal-Mart came the same summer the clothes maker celebrated its 150th birthday. For a century and a half, one of the most recognizable names in American commerce had survived without Wal-Mart. But in October 2002, when Levi Strauss and Wal-Mart announced their engagement, Levi was shrinking rapidly. The pressure on Levi goes back 25 years--well before Wal-Mart was an influence. Between 1981 and 1990, Levi closed 58 U.S. manufacturing plants, sending 25% of its sewing overseas.

Sales for Levi peaked in 1996 at $7.1 billion. By last year, they had spiraled down six years in a row, to $4.1 billion; through the first six months of 2003, sales dropped another 3%. This one account--selling jeans to Wal-Mart--could almost instantly revive Levi.

Last year, Wal-Mart sold more clothing than any other retailer in the country. It also sold more pairs of jeans than any other store. Wal-Mart's own inexpensive house brand of jeans, Faded Glory, is estimated to do $3 billion in sales a year, a house brand nearly the size of Levi Strauss. Perhaps most revealing in terms of Levi's strategic blunders: In 2002, half the jeans sold in the United States cost less than $20 a pair. That same year, Levi didn't offer jeans for less than $30.

For much of the last decade, Levi couldn't have qualified to sell to Wal-Mart. Its computer systems were antiquated, and it was notorious for delivering clothes late to retailers. Levi admitted its on-time delivery rate was 65%. When it announced the deal with Wal-Mart last year, one fashion-industry analyst bluntly predicted Levi would simply fail to deliver the jeans.

But Levi Strauss has taken to the Wal-Mart Way with the intensity of a near-death religious conversion--and Levi's executives were happy to talk about their experience getting ready to sell at Wal-Mart. One hundred people at Levi's headquarters are devoted to the new business; another 12 have set up in an office in Bentonville, near Wal-Mart's headquarters, where the company has hired a respected veteran Wal-Mart sales account manager.

Getting ready for Wal-Mart has been like putting Levi on the Atkins diet. It has helped everything--customer focus, inventory management, speed to market. It has even helped other retailers that buy Levis, because Wal-Mart has forced the company to replenish stores within two days instead of Levi's previous five-day cycle.

And so, Wal-Mart might rescue Levi Strauss. Except for one thing.

Levi didn't actually have any clothes it could sell at Wal-Mart. Everything was too expensive. It had to develop a fresh line for mass retailers: the Levi Strauss Signature brand, featuring Levi Strauss's name on the back of the jeans.

Two months after the launch, Levi basked in the honeymoon glow. Overall sales, after falling for the first six months of 2003, rose 6% in the third quarter; profits in the summer quarter nearly doubled. All, Levi's CEO said, because of Signature.

But the low-end business isn't a business Levi is known for, or one it had been particularly interested in. It's also a business in which Levi will find itself competing with lean, experienced players such as VF and Faded Glory. Levi's makeover might so improve its performance with its non-Wal-Mart suppliers that its established business will thrive, too. It is just as likely that any gains will be offset by the competitive pressures already dissolving Levi's premium brands, and by the cannibalization of its own sales. "It's hard to see how this relationship will boost Levi's higher-end business," says Paul Farris, a professor at the University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business Administration. "It's easy to see how this will hurt the higher-end business."

If Levi clothing is a runaway hit at Wal-Mart, that may indeed rescue Levi as a business. But what will have been rescued? The Signature line--it includes clothing for girls, boys, men, and women--is an odd departure for a company whose brand has long been an American icon. Some of the jeans have the look, the fingertip feel, of pricier Levis. But much of the clothing has the look and feel it must have, given its price (around $23 for adult pants): cheap. Cheap and disappointing to find labeled with Levi Strauss's name. And just five days before the cheery profit news, Levi had another announcement: It is closing its last two U.S. factories, both in San Antonio, and laying off more than 2,500 workers, or 21% of its workforce. A company that 22 years ago had 60 clothing plants in the United States--and that was known as one of the most socially responsible corporations on the planet--will, by 2004, not make any clothes at all. It will just import them.

 

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Ultimate Peach



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  posted on 12/3/2010 at 09:26 AM
I used to wear Levi's all the time, but anymore I find that Wranglers are better jeans and quite often priced less than Levi's. But I might have to try some Texas Jeans has they're made just up the road from Fayetteville in Asheboro, NC.

[Edited on 12/3/2010 by sibwlkr]

 

Maximum Peach



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  posted on 12/3/2010 at 09:40 AM
quote:
http://www.texasjeansusa.com/texas.html

Has anyone tried these? I've worn Levi's my whole life, nothing else, even though I know we don't make 'em here anymore. But something I just read made me change my mind about Levi's:



I'd be interested to try a pair on. I prefer looser fitting jeans than these appear though.

I currently own and wear one pair of jeans each from the following links and am quite happy with them, they are about same price as the texas ones:

http://www.allamericanclothing.com/bottoms.html

http://allusaclothing.com/jeans_pants_made_in_USA.aspx

I think I bought the union line brand from that last link, but it appears the first link sells union line also. I bought a different branded pair from the first link. I also bought the casual pant khaki from that first link, maybe a little thinner material, but has served me very well over the last 2 years. You can find belts USA too.

I don't know about Carhart jeans (alot of Carhart has been moved to Mexico), I see the second link is offering them so I'm sure those are USA. I wouldn't pay more for their brand though.

Also, ever hear of Bill's Khakis? They sell USA jeans, but at triple the cost of the ones from links we are discussing! $35 neighborhood for a made in USA jean is pretty good. Jeans usually last me around 10 years+ since they start out as good pants then evolve into work pants towards the end of their life.

I have bought alot of USA clothes. King Louie is a big supplier of all types of USA clothing. Bayside also makes some very nice USA t-shirts.

Check out Columbia Knit too, I've bought from them, good stuff
http://www.usa-wear.com/factorystore.html

I also just bought some gloves as Christmas presents from here, real nice lady to deal with:
http://newberryknitting.com/home.html

These USA gloves are more expensive, but very high quality based on my usage:
http://www.sullivanglove.com/scripts/prodList.asp?idCategory=17

If you need dress type shoes there are good links for those too at reasonable prices. I recently bought some from Capps Shoes for a wedding I was in (http://www.usmadeshoes.com/military/). They supply the DOD with shoes. There is another company I have book marked on another computer that offers affordable USA dress shoes. Allen Edmonds is a high end expensive USA shoe outlet if that is what you are after.

And ofcourse lots of USA boots still out there. Thorogood is my favorite.

About the only clothing item I can't find USA is underwear (central America) and slippers. Although if you are into the indian style moccasin type there are plenty of choices there made in USA. I've seen alot of odd slippers on the net, but no traditional type made here anymore. Acorn was the last brand that was USA, those are my current slippers, but they are all China now. But really, if you have a bit of time to search things out and some flexability on styling, you can find alot of USA made clothing at decent prices. My wife is always surprising me with some sun dress or this or that she is able to find at the mall or various stores. It happens a few times a year she scores some shirt or something she really likes that is made in USA. Stuff is out there.




[Edited on 12/3/2010 by nebish]

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/3/2010 at 10:38 AM
Thanks for all the links, nebish. There is a looser fitting jean than the one in the picture I posted, I believe. I also wear Carhartts, but never the jeans. Just the overalls and coveralls. A lot of people out here wear Ben Davis, the brand with the monkey. My jeans get cycles like yours, start out as "dress" pants, evolving to work pants. The past few years, I've bought a number of pairs used at the flea market for $8-12. The higher priced ones look almost new. I'm going to check some of the links you posted.

One way I've found that you can buy American made goods, and help the environment at the same time, is buying stuff used at flea markets and yard sales. We used to make stuff here. A lot of that stuff is still here, and you'll find it in yard sales. I have a very cool old Sears and Roebuck deep fryer I paid a couple bucks for at a yard sale. Same with the crock pot I use. I think it is crazy to buy that stuff new, when there are millions of them already out there. Our economy seems to be built on throwing away old stuff and buying new stuff. I'm trying to stay away from that as much as possible. I buy new stuff all the time, as I seriously try to help the small businesses I frequent. I can't believe I bought a new cast iron skillet several weeks ago, but mine were all in storage, and I needed one, and the local hardware store needs the business. Now I have my eye on some old, deep ones with lids at the antique shop. Pricier, but I'll wind up getting one.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 12/3/2010 at 10:42 AM
quote:
I used to wear Levi's all the time, but anymore I find that Wranglers are better jeans and quite often priced less than Levi's. But I might have to try some Texas Jeans has they're made just up the road from Fayetteville in Asheboro, NC.

[Edited on 12/3/2010 by sibwlkr]


My mother bought me a pair of Wranglers' when I was about 22. The crotch was just not deep enough in them for me. My buddies called them my "whore britches" because of the way they fit. I just couldn't pull them up enough. I only wore them a few times.

Interestingly, I found while living and working in rural areas of Texas and Oklahoma, Wrangler's are the brand of choice for the goat ropers and sh*t kickers. I understand it is the lack of a raised seam on the inner leg that they like, far more comfortable when riding a horse, or something.

 

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