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Author: Subject: Any Woodburners?

Zen Peach





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  posted on 11/28/2010 at 06:40 PM
We finally got a "new" wood stove for this little cabin I'm restoring. The one that was here when I moved in was a Montgomery Ward Franklin style, old, cracked, and very inefficient. It was also right where we want to relocate the front door, so the whole affair had to move. I got rid of the stove and covered the hole in the roof months ago. I also completely rebuilt the floor system in the living room, and beefed it up good in the corner where the new stove would go.

On Friday my landlords brought up a stove they had purchased second hand somewhere, and later brought up all new chimney parts to do the install. I had suggested finding a stove with piping included, as the pipe is not cheap, but they got all new stuff, so that makes it easier for me. The stove in not a new one, but a 1990 Vermont Casting Intrepid II. It's in good shape, and the guy who salvaged it and sold it to them had put a new coat of paint on it. I can see that it has sat in a moist place, as there is light surface rust even on the inside. I brushed it all up and vacuumed it good, and also took out the catalytic combustor and took a look at it, and it is is fine. That's a plus, as there are around $100 to replace. I'm sure my landlords knew nothing of any of this, and a newer stove might have been a better choice, for this reason alone. But the stove is here now, and I'm sure it will work fine.

I've already started the installation, but it was raining all day yesterday, so going through the roof was out. I got the stove situation in place, temporarily on some bricks (we still have to build a hearth), and cut the hole in the ceiling. The ceiling is vaulted, once the roof of the original cabin. There is now another roof going over it about 1 foot above, and so today I'm going to cut a hole in that roof, and get this baby cranking. The day started out sunny, and hopefully will be all day. It's already up to 48, from 39 when I got up, and I'm going to let the sun hit the roof for awhile before I go up. With any luck, I'll have this thing in, with a nice fire going, before dark.

Does anyone else here burn wood for heat? This will be my primary source of heat. Right now I'm using two space heaters to heat the place. I knew that first electric bill after I turned them on would be all the motivation they needed to get a stove over here, and it worked. Once the stove is going, I doubt I'll use any other heat source at all. I doubt I'm heating 500 sq. feet.

What kinds of stoves do y'all have, and what kind of wood to you burn? I've been cutting a bunch of oak and douglas fir on this property, but I won't be using it this year. I'll be bartering for wood this winter. I've been doing a lot of reading online, and was initially not planning to burn any of the douglas fir, but apparently people burn everything. It just has to be well seasoned, keep an eye on the temperature of your stove, and keep the chimney clean. I think I will burn the fir next winter, as it doesn't take as long to dry. I've got a bunch of it. The oak I doubt I'll burn until the following year. There's wood for sale everywhere up here, so I'll get by, but I'm looking forward to burning the oak I've been cutting up and splitting, even if it is a ways off.

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]

 

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World Class Peach



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  posted on 11/28/2010 at 07:42 PM
yep, only source of heat is the wood burning stove.

would like to upgrade to something more efficient. that circulates the air.

plan on burning the back porch, as it'll make great starter wood.



i guess that means having to replace it next year though.

oh well, that's next year.

 

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  posted on 11/28/2010 at 10:47 PM
Once you get it up and running it should be fine and the natural way to heat the cabin. A friend of mine had a coal stove and it was the coziest heat I've ever slept by. I loved that. Baseboard heat dries out the air and your sinuses, I have gas fired base board heat right now and I have to use a humidifier at night or else I'm all congested in the morning and I can feel the heat just sucking the moisture out of the skin on my face. I try to keep it cool, but the boiler has a mind of it's own and likes to crank itself up.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 01:56 AM
Stove is all in, with a nice fire going.

A friend came by and held me up for awhile, so I didn't get the shingle work finished. That won't take long in the morning. But the stove is done. There are some fumes coming off the new pipe, which I expected, but the chimney is drawing well, and the fire is burning nicely.

gina, I've had wood heat before, but I never realized what a science there is to having a good fire. I'm going to pick up a stovetop thermometer tomorrow so I can utilize the catalytic combustor properly, and make arrangements for some dry, seasoned wood.

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 02:46 AM
quote:
We finally got a "new" wood stove for this little cabin I'm restoring. The one that was here when I moved in was a Montgomery Ward Franklin style, old, cracked, and very inefficient. It was also right where we want to relocate the front door, so the whole affair had to move. I got rid of the stove and covered the hole in the roof months ago. I also completely rebuilt the floor system in the living room, and beefed it up good in the corner where the new stove would go.

On Friday my landlords brought up a stove they had purchased second hand somewhere, and later brought up all new chimney parts to do the install. I had suggested finding a stove with piping included, as the pipe is not cheap, but they got all new stuff, so that makes it easier for me. The stove in not a new one, but a 1990 Vermont Casting Intrepid II. It's in good shape, and the guy who salvaged it and sold it to them had put a new coat of paint on it. I can see that it has sat in a moist place, as there is light surface rust even on the inside. I brushed it all up and vacuumed it good, and also took out the catalytic combustor and took a look at it, and it is is fine. That's a plus, as there are around $100 to replace. I'm sure my landlords knew nothing of any of this, and a newer stove might have been a better choice, for this reason alone. But the stove is here now, and I'm sure it will work fine.

I've already started the installation, but it was raining all day yesterday, so going through the roof was out. I got the stove situation in place, temporarily on some bricks (we still have to build a hearth), and cut the hole in the ceiling. The ceiling is vaulted, once the roof of the original cabin. There is now another roof going over it about 1 foot above, and so today I'm going to cut a hole in that roof, and get this baby cranking. The day started out sunny, and hopefully will be all day. It's already up to 48, from 39 when I got up, and I'm going to let the sun hit the roof for awhile before I go up. With any luck, I'll have this thing in, with a nice fire going, before dark.

Does anyone else here burn wood for heat? This will be my primary source of heat. Right now I'm using two space heaters to heat the place. I knew that first electric bill after I turned them on would be all the motivation they needed to get a stove over here, and it worked. Once the stove is going, I doubt I'll use any other heat source at all. I doubt I'm heating 500 sq. feet.

What kinds of stoves do y'all have, and what kind of wood to you burn? I've been cutting a bunch of oak and douglas fir on this property, but I won't be using it this year. I'll be bartering for wood this winter. I've been doing a lot of reading online, and was initially not planning to burn any of the douglas fir, but apparently people burn everything. It just has to be well seasoned, keep an eye on the temperature of your stove, and keep the chimney clean. I think I will burn the fir next winter, as it doesn't take as long to dry. I've got a bunch of it. The oak I doubt I'll burn until the following year. There's wood for sale everywhere up here, so I'll get by, but I'm looking forward to burning the oak I've been cutting up and splitting, even if it is a ways off.

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]



I have a Jotul Stove.I've had it about 4 or 5 years. I burn between 3 & 4 cords of wood per season.I finally have a GOOD wood supplier. I got burned ( no pun intended !) the first couple of years, green wood mixed in etc.I save about $300.00 per month on my electric bill when I burn wood in the winter. My whole house is electric.The house is toasty, sometimes it gets too warm, but I'll take extra heat over an extra $300.00 per month on electricity.Good luck with it. It really is very nice to sit in front of a nice stove on a cold winter night.



 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 02:57 AM
When I built the house 6 years ago a wood burning insert was the most viable option although a true stove is the answer. We burn oak, hickory and maybe cedar. I try to buy wood that has been diseased, damaged or struck by lightening so as to not rape the landscape.

When the fireplace is in use the whole main part of the house is toasty warm and the heat does not kick on. The bedrooms are cold when you go to bed but once under the covers it doesn't matter.

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 02:58 AM
I am actually looking at buying an L-shaped couch in order to sleep in front of the fireplace.

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:04 AM
quote:
When I built the house 6 years ago a wood burning insert was the most viable option although a true stove is the answer. We burn oak, hickory and maybe cedar. I try to buy wood that has been diseased, damaged or struck by lightening so as to not rape the landscape.

When the fireplace is in use the whole main part of the house is toasty warm and the heat does not kick on. The bedrooms are cold when you go to bed but once under the covers it doesn't matter.


Its funny but it seems the inserts for the fireplace are more expensive than the free standing stoves.But you have got to have the insert for your fireplace or all your heat goes right up the chimney without one.I really enjoy the woodstove, chopping wood etc.But stacking 3 or 4 cords of wood can be a b**** !!

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:13 AM
I think finding a good wood supplier is a challenge everywhere. Out here the wood choppers and meth cookers are very closely related, and lots of them go around looking for downed trees on other people's property they can steal and sell as dry, seasoned wood. From what I've read online, people have problems everywhere with getting ripped off on wood, both quantity and quality.

DanB, I like your idea of sleeping in front of the stove.

My next purchase is one of these:

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:17 AM
If you're doing you're own splitting (with an ax) try cutting your rounds shorter than the standard 16 inches.

just cuts down of the probablility of getting a bad back from splitting.

pine is fine. burns hot, good to start off a fire before going to oak.



Or, cut all your rounds, and find someone with a splitter.

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:18 AM
quote:
I think finding a good wood supplier is a challenge everywhere. Out here the wood choppers and meth cookers are very closely related, and lots of them go around looking for downed trees on other people's property they can steal and sell as dry, seasoned wood. From what I've read online, people have problems everywhere with getting ripped off on wood, both quantity and quality.

DanB, I like your idea of sleeping in front of the stove.

My next purchase is one of these:





Thats a nice ax.I have one by the same company although that ax blade seems larger in the picture..They are very light and strong and I haven't broke mine. I always break my friends ax handles because he buys wooden ones

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:22 AM
I've been using a wedge and sledge to do the splitting, but I've read rave reviews over this Fiskars Super Splitter. I want to give one a try. I've also watched some videos on Youtube of people splitting wood with one. Pretty impressive.

I'm going to burn the fir I cut, too. I had thought I might just use it for outdoor fires, but once it dries, I'll burn it in here. I only have fir and oak cut on the property, but madrone is also widely available here, too.

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:23 AM
quote:
quote:
quote:
We finally got a "new" wood stove for this little cabin I'm restoring. The one that was here when I moved in was a Montgomery Ward Franklin style, old, cracked, and very inefficient. It was also right where we want to relocate the front door, so the whole affair had to move. I got rid of the stove and covered the hole in the roof months ago. I also completely rebuilt the floor system in the living room, and beefed it up good in the corner where the new stove would go.

On Friday my landlords brought up a stove they had purchased second hand somewhere, and later brought up all new chimney parts to do the install. I had suggested finding a stove with piping included, as the pipe is not cheap, but they got all new stuff, so that makes it easier for me. The stove in not a new one, but a 1990 Vermont Casting Intrepid II. It's in good shape, and the guy who salvaged it and sold it to them had put a new coat of paint on it. I can see that it has sat in a moist place, as there is light surface rust even on the inside. I brushed it all up and vacuumed it good, and also took out the catalytic combustor and took a look at it, and it is is fine. That's a plus, as there are around $100 to replace. I'm sure my landlords knew nothing of any of this, and a newer stove might have been a better choice, for this reason alone. But the stove is here now, and I'm sure it will work fine.

I've already started the installation, but it was raining all day yesterday, so going through the roof was out. I got the stove situation in place, temporarily on some bricks (we still have to build a hearth), and cut the hole in the ceiling. The ceiling is vaulted, once the roof of the original cabin. There is now another roof going over it about 1 foot above, and so today I'm going to cut a hole in that roof, and get this baby cranking. The day started out sunny, and hopefully will be all day. It's already up to 48, from 39 when I got up, and I'm going to let the sun hit the roof for awhile before I go up. With any luck, I'll have this thing in, with a nice fire going, before dark.

Does anyone else here burn wood for heat? This will be my primary source of heat. Right now I'm using two space heaters to heat the place. I knew that first electric bill after I turned them on would be all the motivation they needed to get a stove over here, and it worked. Once the stove is going, I doubt I'll use any other heat source at all. I doubt I'm heating 500 sq. feet.

What kinds of stoves do y'all have, and what kind of wood to you burn? I've been cutting a bunch of oak and douglas fir on this property, but I won't be using it this year. I'll be bartering for wood this winter. I've been doing a lot of reading online, and was initially not planning to burn any of the douglas fir, but apparently people burn everything. It just has to be well seasoned, keep an eye on the temperature of your stove, and keep the chimney clean. I think I will burn the fir next winter, as it doesn't take as long to dry. I've got a bunch of it. The oak I doubt I'll burn until the following year. There's wood for sale everywhere up here, so I'll get by, but I'm looking forward to burning the oak I've been cutting up and splitting, even if it is a ways off.

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]



I have a Jotul Stove.I've had it about 4 or 5 years. I burn between 3 & 4 cords of wood per season.I finally have a GOOD wood supplier. I got burned ( no pun intended !) the first couple of years, green wood mixed in etc.I save about $300.00 per month on my electric bill when I burn wood in the winter. My whole house is electric.The house is toasty, sometimes it gets too warm, but I'll take extra heat over an extra $300.00 per month on electricity.Good luck with it. It really is very nice to sit in front of a nice stove on a cold winter night.





My folks bought a Jotul last year...great stove. I've been chopping up maple and cherry wood that they've taken down...cherry's were diseased, the maples too close to grown healthy. Previous owner didn't really know what he was doing. Chopping wood is a pretty good workout! And a good stress reliever! And the resulting warmth isn't bad, either.



X 2 !!

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:25 AM
quote:
quote:
quote:
We finally got a "new" wood stove for this little cabin I'm restoring. The one that was here when I moved in was a Montgomery Ward Franklin style, old, cracked, and very inefficient. It was also right where we want to relocate the front door, so the whole affair had to move. I got rid of the stove and covered the hole in the roof months ago. I also completely rebuilt the floor system in the living room, and beefed it up good in the corner where the new stove would go.

On Friday my landlords brought up a stove they had purchased second hand somewhere, and later brought up all new chimney parts to do the install. I had suggested finding a stove with piping included, as the pipe is not cheap, but they got all new stuff, so that makes it easier for me. The stove in not a new one, but a 1990 Vermont Casting Intrepid II. It's in good shape, and the guy who salvaged it and sold it to them had put a new coat of paint on it. I can see that it has sat in a moist place, as there is light surface rust even on the inside. I brushed it all up and vacuumed it good, and also took out the catalytic combustor and took a look at it, and it is is fine. That's a plus, as there are around $100 to replace. I'm sure my landlords knew nothing of any of this, and a newer stove might have been a better choice, for this reason alone. But the stove is here now, and I'm sure it will work fine.

I've already started the installation, but it was raining all day yesterday, so going through the roof was out. I got the stove situation in place, temporarily on some bricks (we still have to build a hearth), and cut the hole in the ceiling. The ceiling is vaulted, once the roof of the original cabin. There is now another roof going over it about 1 foot above, and so today I'm going to cut a hole in that roof, and get this baby cranking. The day started out sunny, and hopefully will be all day. It's already up to 48, from 39 when I got up, and I'm going to let the sun hit the roof for awhile before I go up. With any luck, I'll have this thing in, with a nice fire going, before dark.

Does anyone else here burn wood for heat? This will be my primary source of heat. Right now I'm using two space heaters to heat the place. I knew that first electric bill after I turned them on would be all the motivation they needed to get a stove over here, and it worked. Once the stove is going, I doubt I'll use any other heat source at all. I doubt I'm heating 500 sq. feet.

What kinds of stoves do y'all have, and what kind of wood to you burn? I've been cutting a bunch of oak and douglas fir on this property, but I won't be using it this year. I'll be bartering for wood this winter. I've been doing a lot of reading online, and was initially not planning to burn any of the douglas fir, but apparently people burn everything. It just has to be well seasoned, keep an eye on the temperature of your stove, and keep the chimney clean. I think I will burn the fir next winter, as it doesn't take as long to dry. I've got a bunch of it. The oak I doubt I'll burn until the following year. There's wood for sale everywhere up here, so I'll get by, but I'm looking forward to burning the oak I've been cutting up and splitting, even if it is a ways off.

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]



I have a Jotul Stove.I've had it about 4 or 5 years. I burn between 3 & 4 cords of wood per season.I finally have a GOOD wood supplier. I got burned ( no pun intended !) the first couple of years, green wood mixed in etc.I save about $300.00 per month on my electric bill when I burn wood in the winter. My whole house is electric.The house is toasty, sometimes it gets too warm, but I'll take extra heat over an extra $300.00 per month on electricity.Good luck with it. It really is very nice to sit in front of a nice stove on a cold winter night.






My folks bought a Jotul last year...great stove. I've been chopping up maple and cherry wood that they've taken down...cherry's were diseased, the maples too close to grown healthy. Previous owner didn't really know what he was doing. Chopping wood is a pretty good workout! And a good stress reliever! And the resulting warmth isn't bad, either.


I think Jotul is the oldest stove manufacturer, and many people say they are the best. Everyone I know who has one loves it. You should check out the videos on the Super Splitter, Charlie.

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:27 AM
If you see a guy who looks like this, hanging out in front of home depot on a saturday, pick him up.

Pay whatever his day labor rate is.


 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:29 AM
quote:
If you see a guy who looks like this, hanging out in front of home depot on a saturday, pick him up.

Pay whatever his day labor rate is.





LMAO !!! He don't come cheap !! How do you think he got to be so big !!

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:30 AM
Have a good night guys !
 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 04:48 AM
I've had 4 or 5 over the years and nothing beat the Fisher (mama bear) - however, I switched just last year to a Buck Stove, mainly for the catalytic converter - and the glass door and windows add a lot of visual appeal. It's also the type that circulates air through it with a fan, optionally.

There is a science to it, SCB, you're right. The one thing I do *not like about the catalytic c. is, well, it's a pain in the ass sometimes.

Whereas before the 2 most important adjustments were 'air in' and damper "setting" in the stove pipe. Enter the catalytic c. and the flow changes, it's temperature-dependent, etc., etc., ......... in other words, the science changes.

It's more difficult - in fact, stove pipe dampers in conjunction with the EPA-o.k. stoves is generally considered questionable or not cool, as I understand it (because they potentially reduce the fire below the temp necessary to reburn gases in the c.c. - particularly late in the fire) - it becomes the 'smolder' that the EPA is trying to stop.

So, for me, it's wood-ration and cost vs. trying to do my part for air-quality—a mental struggle I don't particularly need!

Haha ... there's all kinds of nut-job stuff to learn if the winter's long enough--I once knew a guy who could—and would—wax poetic about the B.T.U. content of all the species of firewood, propensity for creosote-formation, etc. The same guy would walk around with a full can of Pepsi in the front pocket of too-tight Levis, and always would struggle getting the can out. I live in a strange place!

Happy wood-burning to ya! It's a good hobby - and don't forget to cook on it, toss 'taters in foil in the coals, make jerky, etc. (oh, and the Ladies will dig that wood-stove)

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 02:25 PM
wood is our primary source of heat we do have a forced air backup we put up about 6 cords each winter... we have a stove made around here and it has the new tech for reburning gases via catalitic reburner and it works pretty good the key is bone dry wood get it early split and stack and cover well against rain and snow it makes all the difference.

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:12 PM
quote:
wood is our primary source of heat we do have a forced air backup we put up about 6 cords each winter... we have a stove made around here and it has the new tech for reburning gases via catalitic reburner and it works pretty good the key is bone dry wood get it early split and stack and cover well against rain and snow it makes all the difference.


"Gasification".......It's highly efficient for not only wood stoves, but outdoor wood/oil/propane/natural gas boilers as well. Even some whole house pellet boilers come equipped with this new technology. While I don't burn wood, I do have a pellet stove in my living room as a secondary heat source. Lopi Fox Fire....Which I'm looking to replace in the next year or two with a newer, more efficient model. I'm considering a Harman, Quadrafire, or another Lopi. And also possibly an Enviro or Napolean brand stove. While pellet stoves don't heat in the same manner as a wood stove, they can be more convenient. Growing up in upstate, NY, my father had a wood stove connected to his forced air furnace (still does in fact) so I've spent many an hour splitting and piling wood. I vowed when I had my own house, I'd have something a little less labor intensive.

My boss has an outdoor wood boiler that he puts almost 40 cord of wood through each season to heat his nearly 3,000 square foot home with. He's getting to the point where he's sick of spending hours upon hours cutting and splitting wood each spring and summer. Pellet stoves can be a pain, but they're much better on the back.....

 

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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:42 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
We finally got a "new" wood stove for this little cabin I'm restoring. The one that was here when I moved in was a Montgomery Ward Franklin style, old, cracked, and very inefficient. It was also right where we want to relocate the front door, so the whole affair had to move. I got rid of the stove and covered the hole in the roof months ago. I also completely rebuilt the floor system in the living room, and beefed it up good in the corner where the new stove would go.

On Friday my landlords brought up a stove they had purchased second hand somewhere, and later brought up all new chimney parts to do the install. I had suggested finding a stove with piping included, as the pipe is not cheap, but they got all new stuff, so that makes it easier for me. The stove in not a new one, but a 1990 Vermont Casting Intrepid II. It's in good shape, and the guy who salvaged it and sold it to them had put a new coat of paint on it. I can see that it has sat in a moist place, as there is light surface rust even on the inside. I brushed it all up and vacuumed it good, and also took out the catalytic combustor and took a look at it, and it is is fine. That's a plus, as there are around $100 to replace. I'm sure my landlords knew nothing of any of this, and a newer stove might have been a better choice, for this reason alone. But the stove is here now, and I'm sure it will work fine.

I've already started the installation, but it was raining all day yesterday, so going through the roof was out. I got the stove situation in place, temporarily on some bricks (we still have to build a hearth), and cut the hole in the ceiling. The ceiling is vaulted, once the roof of the original cabin. There is now another roof going over it about 1 foot above, and so today I'm going to cut a hole in that roof, and get this baby cranking. The day started out sunny, and hopefully will be all day. It's already up to 48, from 39 when I got up, and I'm going to let the sun hit the roof for awhile before I go up. With any luck, I'll have this thing in, with a nice fire going, before dark.

Does anyone else here burn wood for heat? This will be my primary source of heat. Right now I'm using two space heaters to heat the place. I knew that first electric bill after I turned them on would be all the motivation they needed to get a stove over here, and it worked. Once the stove is going, I doubt I'll use any other heat source at all. I doubt I'm heating 500 sq. feet.

What kinds of stoves do y'all have, and what kind of wood to you burn? I've been cutting a bunch of oak and douglas fir on this property, but I won't be using it this year. I'll be bartering for wood this winter. I've been doing a lot of reading online, and was initially not planning to burn any of the douglas fir, but apparently people burn everything. It just has to be well seasoned, keep an eye on the temperature of your stove, and keep the chimney clean. I think I will burn the fir next winter, as it doesn't take as long to dry. I've got a bunch of it. The oak I doubt I'll burn until the following year. There's wood for sale everywhere up here, so I'll get by, but I'm looking forward to burning the oak I've been cutting up and splitting, even if it is a ways off.

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]



I have a Jotul Stove.I've had it about 4 or 5 years. I burn between 3 & 4 cords of wood per season.I finally have a GOOD wood supplier. I got burned ( no pun intended !) the first couple of years, green wood mixed in etc.I save about $300.00 per month on my electric bill when I burn wood in the winter. My whole house is electric.The house is toasty, sometimes it gets too warm, but I'll take extra heat over an extra $300.00 per month on electricity.Good luck with it. It really is very nice to sit in front of a nice stove on a cold winter night.






My folks bought a Jotul last year...great stove. I've been chopping up maple and cherry wood that they've taken down...cherry's were diseased, the maples too close to grown healthy. Previous owner didn't really know what he was doing. Chopping wood is a pretty good workout! And a good stress reliever! And the resulting warmth isn't bad, either.


I think Jotul is the oldest stove manufacturer, and many people say they are the best. Everyone I know who has one loves it. You should check out the videos on the Super Splitter, Charlie.


I'll check out the vids, but I kinda prefer doing the splitting with a mawl, wedge and sledge hammer myself...better workout. The machine wouldn't be as much of a stress reliever.


It's not a machine. It's an axe.

 

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Zen Peach



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Registered: 8/9/2002
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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:55 PM
quote:
I've had 4 or 5 over the years and nothing beat the Fisher (mama bear) - however, I switched just last year to a Buck Stove, mainly for the catalytic converter - and the glass door and windows add a lot of visual appeal. It's also the type that circulates air through it with a fan, optionally.

There is a science to it, SCB, you're right. The one thing I do *not like about the catalytic c. is, well, it's a pain in the ass sometimes.

Whereas before the 2 most important adjustments were 'air in' and damper "setting" in the stove pipe. Enter the catalytic c. and the flow changes, it's temperature-dependent, etc., etc., ......... in other words, the science changes.

It's more difficult - in fact, stove pipe dampers in conjunction with the EPA-o.k. stoves is generally considered questionable or not cool, as I understand it (because they potentially reduce the fire below the temp necessary to reburn gases in the c.c. - particularly late in the fire) - it becomes the 'smolder' that the EPA is trying to stop.

So, for me, it's wood-ration and cost vs. trying to do my part for air-quality—a mental struggle I don't particularly need!

Haha ... there's all kinds of nut-job stuff to learn if the winter's long enough--I once knew a guy who could—and would—wax poetic about the B.T.U. content of all the species of firewood, propensity for creosote-formation, etc. The same guy would walk around with a full can of Pepsi in the front pocket of too-tight Levis, and always would struggle getting the can out. I live in a strange place!

Happy wood-burning to ya! It's a good hobby - and don't forget to cook on it, toss 'taters in foil in the coals, make jerky, etc. (oh, and the Ladies will dig that wood-stove)


I had no idea there was so much to know about fires. I've always been able to build a nice campfire, and thought I knew it all, or most of it. But then I found the website, Hearth.com, and that's where all the fireburners hang out. More information there than I can absorb right now. It's funny to read their posts. They really make it a scientific study, keeping records to determine the ideal combination to get the longest, hottest burns out of the least amount of wood. Lots of woodcutters post there, too. These guys know their stuff.

I live in a strange place, too, Rob. I call it Appalachia West. As I read in an article in the paper last week, "Everyone knows the further up Highway 9 you go, the more "exotic" it gets." I live as far up Highway 9 as you can go before it is all forest for many miles. Your buddy would fit right in up here.

I'm not using a damper in the stove pipe. The owners manual I found online for this unit says burn it with the stove damper open and the air intake open until stovetop temps reach 400-450, then shut down the damper and dial back the air inflow. Now the stack is drawing through the catalytic cumbustor, and the built in thermostat should control the air intake after that. At least that is the way I understand it. I'll pick up a thermometer today. Right now I've got the damper open and just letting it burn.

 

____________________



 

Zen Peach



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Posts: 15832
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Registered: 8/9/2002
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  posted on 11/29/2010 at 03:56 PM
quote:
If you see a guy who looks like this, hanging out in front of home depot on a saturday, pick him up.

Pay whatever his day labor rate is.




I'd do a trade with him, but I don't think I could roll a fattie big enough for this guy!

 

____________________



 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 15832
(15866 all sites)
Registered: 8/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/29/2010 at 04:01 PM
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
We finally got a "new" wood stove for this little cabin I'm restoring. The one that was here when I moved in was a Montgomery Ward Franklin style, old, cracked, and very inefficient. It was also right where we want to relocate the front door, so the whole affair had to move. I got rid of the stove and covered the hole in the roof months ago. I also completely rebuilt the floor system in the living room, and beefed it up good in the corner where the new stove would go.

On Friday my landlords brought up a stove they had purchased second hand somewhere, and later brought up all new chimney parts to do the install. I had suggested finding a stove with piping included, as the pipe is not cheap, but they got all new stuff, so that makes it easier for me. The stove in not a new one, but a 1990 Vermont Casting Intrepid II. It's in good shape, and the guy who salvaged it and sold it to them had put a new coat of paint on it. I can see that it has sat in a moist place, as there is light surface rust even on the inside. I brushed it all up and vacuumed it good, and also took out the catalytic combustor and took a look at it, and it is is fine. That's a plus, as there are around $100 to replace. I'm sure my landlords knew nothing of any of this, and a newer stove might have been a better choice, for this reason alone. But the stove is here now, and I'm sure it will work fine.

I've already started the installation, but it was raining all day yesterday, so going through the roof was out. I got the stove situation in place, temporarily on some bricks (we still have to build a hearth), and cut the hole in the ceiling. The ceiling is vaulted, once the roof of the original cabin. There is now another roof going over it about 1 foot above, and so today I'm going to cut a hole in that roof, and get this baby cranking. The day started out sunny, and hopefully will be all day. It's already up to 48, from 39 when I got up, and I'm going to let the sun hit the roof for awhile before I go up. With any luck, I'll have this thing in, with a nice fire going, before dark.

Does anyone else here burn wood for heat? This will be my primary source of heat. Right now I'm using two space heaters to heat the place. I knew that first electric bill after I turned them on would be all the motivation they needed to get a stove over here, and it worked. Once the stove is going, I doubt I'll use any other heat source at all. I doubt I'm heating 500 sq. feet.

What kinds of stoves do y'all have, and what kind of wood to you burn? I've been cutting a bunch of oak and douglas fir on this property, but I won't be using it this year. I'll be bartering for wood this winter. I've been doing a lot of reading online, and was initially not planning to burn any of the douglas fir, but apparently people burn everything. It just has to be well seasoned, keep an eye on the temperature of your stove, and keep the chimney clean. I think I will burn the fir next winter, as it doesn't take as long to dry. I've got a bunch of it. The oak I doubt I'll burn until the following year. There's wood for sale everywhere up here, so I'll get by, but I'm looking forward to burning the oak I've been cutting up and splitting, even if it is a ways off.

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]

[Edited on 11/28/2010 by SantaCruzBluz]



I have a Jotul Stove.I've had it about 4 or 5 years. I burn between 3 & 4 cords of wood per season.I finally have a GOOD wood supplier. I got burned ( no pun intended !) the first couple of years, green wood mixed in etc.I save about $300.00 per month on my electric bill when I burn wood in the winter. My whole house is electric.The house is toasty, sometimes it gets too warm, but I'll take extra heat over an extra $300.00 per month on electricity.Good luck with it. It really is very nice to sit in front of a nice stove on a cold winter night.






My folks bought a Jotul last year...great stove. I've been chopping up maple and cherry wood that they've taken down...cherry's were diseased, the maples too close to grown healthy. Previous owner didn't really know what he was doing. Chopping wood is a pretty good workout! And a good stress reliever! And the resulting warmth isn't bad, either.


I think Jotul is the oldest stove manufacturer, and many people say they are the best. Everyone I know who has one loves it. You should check out the videos on the Super Splitter, Charlie.


I'll check out the vids, but I kinda prefer doing the splitting with a mawl, wedge and sledge hammer myself...better workout. The machine wouldn't be as much of a stress reliever.


It's not a machine. It's an axe.


Oh! I didn't know that. We've got a couple of mauls (spelled it wrong above) over here, one of which is pretty powerful. The oak handles don't last very long over here, though. Perhaps I should invest in one with a fiberglass handle.

edit: replace 'oak' with 'hickory'

[Edited on 11/29/2010 by CharlieTaber]


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WoAOYLMU1Wc

 

____________________



 

Zen Peach



Karma:
Posts: 15832
(15866 all sites)
Registered: 8/9/2002
Status: Offline

  posted on 11/29/2010 at 04:07 PM
quote:
wood is our primary source of heat we do have a forced air backup we put up about 6 cords each winter... we have a stove made around here and it has the new tech for reburning gases via catalitic reburner and it works pretty good the key is bone dry wood get it early split and stack and cover well against rain and snow it makes all the difference.


I'm working on wood now for next year, but I'll have to get some for this year. I definitely plan to have a place to stack it and cover it with a tarp during the winter. At some point I'll probably build a small shed to keep wood under.

Six cords! Do you split it yourself, Ryde?

 

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