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Author: Subject: A little light reading on albums for those interested

Extreme Peach





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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 07:33 AM

I wrote the following articles for a content site as a creative exercise, and because I'm a little geeky about such things I was thinking about how many great albums were released during the years 1967-1973 and decided to start profiling those years releases. Some good folks here encouraged me to share them (after some hesitation on my part) so here there are!

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2648491/1971_a_golden_year_of_rock _albums.html?cat=33

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2671341/1969_a_prolific_year_in_ro ck_album.html?cat=33

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/2882564/albums_of_1972_a_review_of _the_best.html?cat=33

 
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Zen Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 07:52 AM
good choices.

 

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True Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 08:07 AM
Excellent Van! Short but sweet. I'm stuck in a time warp from that period. I probably own about 90% of those LP's that you covered.

Thanks for sharing.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 08:12 AM
Damn!

Can't get to the site from work.

Will check back later ...

 

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Maximum Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 09:33 AM
Nicely done Van! I enjoyed reading that.

I noted towards the end of the 1971 article you mention that it must have been great to have been a rock fan during those years. I was 15 that year, and definitely coming into my own as a music fan. This was aided in no small part by growing up close enough to NYC and having some great FM stations (primarily WNEW) who were real epicenters of the rock world. Artists would drop in all the time, the idea of a play list hadn't yet invaded the program manager's thoughts, and you could often hear whole album sides played in their entirety with no breaks (what do you think those DJ's were doing on those long breaks?).

Maybe I wasn't quite old enough to appreciate it yet, but my remembrance of the times musically was that we sort of took it all for granted. I don't mean that in any negative way. It was such an embarrassment of riches, but that didn't really become apparent till many years later. Only when the creativity and productivity started to fade, and when the experimental years gave way to more formulaic and popular formats (disco!) could you look back and appreciate just how remarkable that period was. There was genre bending and experimentation in all directions, but we took it in stride, appreciated it, and thought it would probably go on forever.

One huge difference was the place that music held in the minds of many and its importance to that generation in general. With alternatives like a max of 6-8 channels on TV, board games, hanging with your friends, or just generally finding trouble, listening on the radio or dropping the needle in the groove was one of a very limited set of entertainment options. It therefore took a far higher prominence in the everyday life of most young folks at the time. Far from the sort of throw-away mentality of today's pop culture, there was a lot more attention, discussion, and examination towards the music of the day.

Its all different today, and like many things, not for the better. But you don't realize that till you're further down the road. I'm just glad I was able to see some of it.

 

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Zen Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 10:04 AM
Enjoyed reading the reviews and comments. I was 16 in 1971, and entered my junior year in high school that fall. As Fuji said, entertainment options were nothing like what they are now, and getting together with friends to "listen to records" was way at the top of the list. Most high school kids then bought 45s more than albums. they were cheaper, and you might not like all the songs on an album. I definitely felt like I had grown up a little when I started buying albums, my very first purchase being Iron Butterfly's In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida. I already had Led Zeppelin II, which my cousin got in the mail from the record club, didn't like it, and gave it to me.

Living in the Deep South, we had AM radio during the day. We could get WLS at night. I'm not sure when we got our first FM station, but I think it was only on during the day. Music on TV consisted of american Grandstand, and a few local shows. I remember how exciting it was when a new album from a favorite band came out. You might hear a track on the radio, but generally you had to buy a new album if you wanted to hear it. I'll never forget when Jack Frost showed up at my house on a Saturday morning with the new Marshall Tucker album, A New Life, a few years later.

It was a very exciting time musically, even for a kid. There were new albums coming out everyday. We'd ride our bikes to Melody Music, or the Music connection, just to look at the records, and listen to them. New releases were 3.99, and I bought a lot of albums in the early 70s for that price.

Things have definitely changed now, though. I gave all my albums to a friend years ago, when I started buying CDs. What was I thinking? Now I'm buying old vinyl again, even though I don't have a turntable, yet. I'm paying less now than I did back then for albums in like new condition. And I guess I'll be buying some of the new ones they are selling now, too. Another full circle.

 

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Extreme Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 11:38 AM

Thanks guys for the comments and, especially the perspective from that time period. I was born at the tail end of this period I'm profiling, so I hardly speak from first hand experience, but I remember being a kid in the late 70s and listening to my older brother playing his records and marveling at the album art when I had a chance to view them. I think this helped to shape my taste in music. Contemporary music didn't offer a whole lot when I was growing up in the 80s in various parts of the rural northeast. Fuji, we never had a WNEW to tune in........mostly only country or top 40 stations on the radio. So whenever we traveled near an urban area it was exciting to pick up a classic rock station and hear some Who or Zep or GD. By the time i got to college in the early 90s, we had been rescued by the grunge bands, the Peppers, and the return of the ABB, etc., so rock music was good again for a few years. But, I'm sure most feel that way about their era.

Well, thanks again for the feedback and I'm glad that some of you enjoyed reading them!

PS: It has kind of nagged me that I forgot to mention Aqualung and CSN's first album in their respective year articles. oh well....

 

World Class Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 02:11 PM
Good choices for 1971! I'd throw some more prog rock in for meself, but I 'd be happy with your picks if I were on a desert island.

Caveat: spell John McLaughlin's name correctly or else his fans will track you down and whack you with double-necked instruments. Them people crazy.

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 06:28 PM
Very good reads.

Would of been cool to be alive in that era but Im glad I'm growing up now

 

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Extreme Peach



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  posted on 4/15/2010 at 06:30 PM
quote:
Good choices for 1971! I'd throw some more prog rock in for meself, but I 'd be happy with your picks if I were on a desert island.

Caveat: spell John McLaughlin's name correctly or else his fans will track you down and whack you with double-necked instruments. Them people crazy.


What did I do? Throw a "G" in there? Whoops! I consider myself a fan of his as well, so I shouldn't have missed that. As far as the progressive rock goes, I do like Jethro Tull, but my collection is pretty light on the rest of it. I should take time to get more familiar with some, I suppose.....

Thanks for reading!

 
 


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