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Author: Subject: Official Dickey Betts Macon thread. Roll call/Suggestions-n-Planning...

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 12:49 PM
Here's a review: http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20180516/review-dickey-betts-band-debut-i n-sarasota-at-white-buffalo-saloon

Review: Dickey Betts Band debut in Sarasota at White Buffalo Saloon
By Wade Tatangelo

Allman Brothers Band founding member returns to performing following four-year hiatus with hometown “live rehearsal show” featuring his songs and first-time ever Betts solo band performances of Gregg Allman songs

Dickey Betts returned to the stage Tuesday following about four years of retirement and elated a capacity crowd while carrying on the rich Allman Brothers Band legacy he played a key role in creating back in 1969.

Wearing a cowboy hat and matching boots with blue jeans and a flannel shirt, a white-bearded Betts took the stage at White Buffalo Saloon about seven miles from his Sarasota County home and launched into the instrumental “Hot ‘Lanta.” The song first appeared on the Allman Brothers’ iconic 1971 live album “At Fillmore East” and is based on a Betts melody line. It’s also the rare Allman Brothers song credited to all of the band’s original lineup of which only Betts and drummer Jaimoe have survived.

Tuesday, “Hot ‘Lanta’ became a showcase as much for Dickey as his gifted son, Duane Betts, with the two men taking turns soloing on their Gibson guitars while joined by the rest of the outstanding new band that includes the Betts’ former Great Southern musicians Frankie Lombardi (drums), Mike Kach (keyboards and vocals) and Pedro Arevalo (bass), as well as Damon Fowler (guitar and vocals) and Steve Camilleri (drums).

Fowler, a former Anna Maria Island resident who issued a couple high-charting blues albums as a solo artist on the Blind Pig label and played in Butch Trucks and the Freight Train Band, kicked off “Statesboro Blues” with searing slide guitar licks that recalled, without aping, those of Duane Allman. And then came the Gregg Allman-esque vocals.

It was a sheer joy to hear keyboardist Kach sing those timeless lines by Blind Willie McTell and made famous by the Allman Brothers, again via “At Fillmore East,” while playing the bluesy keyboard parts. In July of 2015, many of the same people on stage and in attendance Tuesday were at the White Buffalo Saloon for a Kach benefit concert to raise funds as he battled cirrhosis of the liver. Kach looked and sounded wonderful last night and is reportedly living a clean and healthy life.

Dickey sounded charmingly gruff on “Nothing You Can Do,” a fun, upbeat song from his 1977 solo album “Dickey Betts & Great Southern.” Duane Betts and Fowler each delivered sweet solos followed by the maestro issuing his finest so far of the night. Then, for the first time since splitting with the Allman Brothers Band in 2000, Dickey Betts performed a song written by his longtime band mate Gregg Allman, who passed away last May. Kach sang the famous “Midnight Rider” lyrics with Fowler joining on harmony vocals and slide guitar and Dickey also contributing a smart solo to a song I never thought he would play again.

Opening with melodic quotations from Jerry Garcia’s “Franklin’s Tower,” the band gave a beautiful performance of Dickey’s “Blue Sky” with the legend leading what became largely an ebullient sing along with wall-to-wall crowd participation. Listening close, though, the real thrill, for me, at least, was hearing Dickey and Fowler harmonize on guitar, recalling the sounds made by Dickey and Duane Allman down in Miami at Criteria Studios back in 1971 shortly before the elder Allman died in a motorcycle crash.

Kach took the spotlight next to sing his self-penned ballad “Get Away” with Dickey adding guitar fills while seated on a stool with Duane Betts and Fowler taking turns soloing. Dickey, still seated, then sang his ballad “Seven Turns,” the title track to the Allman Brothers hit comeback album from 1990. The two songs paired nicely, Dickey’s weathered vocals an ideal instrument for the lyrics about a lifetime of “runnin’ wild out on the road, just like a leaf on the wind.”

On stage, Dickey spends most of his time looking to bassist Pedro Arevalo for cues and when Arevalo played the signature Berry Oakley riff to the Gregg Allman-composed “Whipping Post” all eyes were on him, with the audience erupting. Again, not a song most of us thought we would ever hear Dickey perform since splitting with the Allman Brothers nearly two decades ago. Fowler, who has been playing “Whipping Post” since he was a teen prodigy two decades ago at venues across Tampa Bay, played a powerhouse solo with Dickey closing with a nuanced one that reinforced the plaintive lyrics delivered with equal parts pathos and determination by Kach.

The band followed “Whipping Post” with Dickey’s composition “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” and it was a highlight of the evening witnessing father and son make their guitars sound like violins on the masterful instrumental, which, like “Hot ’Lanta,” “Statesboro Blues” and “Whipping Post” became a rock classic after appearing on “At Fillmore East.”

The Allman Brothers Band had one Top 10 pop hit, and it came in 1973 with Dickey’s country-rocker “Ramblin’ Man,” which he sang lead as well as playing lead guitar. Last night, it served as an exciting encore with plenty of crowd participation. Dickey gave a slower, soulful makeover with Kach’s keyboard solo a standout right along with hearing Dickey deliver those iconic licks.

Billed as a “live rehearsal show,” the 1,000 tickets, all priced at $60, sold out less than about a week after being announced. As someone who has been listening to the Allman Brothers my entire life (thanks Dad!) and attending Dickey Betts shows now for nearly 20 years, I found the experience not only entertaining but heartwarming. I’m sure it was cathartic for the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer on stage, too, considering the recent deaths of his former Allman Brother band mates Allman and Butch Trucks.

It was a joyous evening, one I think the vast majority in attendance will cherish for years to come. The 74-year-old Betts is the grandfather we all wish we had to lead a jam session on the front porch. The Dickey Betts Band tour of 2018 not to be missed.

Setlist:

1. “Hot ’Lanta”

2. “Statesboro Blues”

3. “Nothing You Can Do”

4. “Midnight Rider”

5. “Blue Sky”

6. “Get Away”

7. “Seven Turns”

8. “Whipping Post”

9. “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed”

10. “Ramblin’ Man”

 

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 01:10 PM
quote:
tbomike. You don't like me do you. You don't like the FACT the last line up or any other line up can't match the original lineup. I'm going to say what I want on any thread as many times as I want. Don't like what I write? Don't read it. You must be one of a few I've encountered who think the last line up was the best version of the ABB. Only someone who never saw the original band hitting the note at The Fillmore East or West would make such a mistake. And I bet Warren and Derek agree with me. But you do it your way. I could care less.


I don't think it's a question of like or dislike, but that you state your opinion as FACT. I never saw the original band, but I agree that there are quite a few tunes that subsequent versions of the band could not touch. But give me Jessica with Chuck Leavell or Instrumental Illness and I am in music heaven.

It's apples vs. oranges and opinion, not fact. Some people like Coke, some prefer Pepsi, some don't like either and some could care less.

 

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 01:38 PM
quote:

Here's a review: http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20180516/review-dickey-betts-band-debut-i n-sarasota-at-white-buffalo-saloon

Review: Dickey Betts Band debut in Sarasota at White Buffalo Saloon
By Wade Tatangel


Wow, really a sterling review. Very nice to hear. Thanks for posting pork chop.

 

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 01:58 PM
quote:
quote:

Here's a review: http://www.heraldtribune.com/news/20180516/review-dickey-betts-band-debut-i n-sarasota-at-white-buffalo-saloon

Review: Dickey Betts Band debut in Sarasota at White Buffalo Saloon
By Wade Tatangel


Wow, really a sterling review. Very nice to hear. Thanks for posting pork chop.


Sterling review indeed, perhaps a little rosy. I watched some of the amateur videos of last night's rehearsal show, and although it's undeniably a treat to see Dickey back on stage (with a healthy Mike Kach!), playing a few of Gregg's songs no less, there is naturally some rust on the old greyhound. Nevertheless, tomorrow night's shows in Macon have the promise of a truly magical moment - I'm really interested to hear what kinds of interactions, if any, there will be between Dickey and Jaimoe. It certainly seems like they have put the past in their rear view mirrors, and to see them share a stage again would be pretty special.

 

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 02:43 PM
Wade Tatangelo has always given Dickey great reviews, even on occasions he shouldn't have. He's Sarasota's music reporter and Dickey is a local legend, so I'm sure he avoids burning that bridge. I would.

If you visit the Dickey fan page on Facebook you'll get a more honest range of opinions, although disappointingly many of the bad reviews are being deleted.

As usual for Dickey the reviews are mixed as it comes down to personal expectations. The higher the expectations, the worse the review.

They cleared 60 grand in ticket sales for that rehearsal.

 

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 04:26 PM
quote:

Wade Tatangelo has always given Dickey great reviews, even on occasions he shouldn't have. He's Sarasota's music reporter and Dickey is a local legend, so I'm sure he avoids burning that bridge. I would.


Kind of see what you mean. I found Hot 'Lanta from last night and have to say I thought it was a bit sloppy. Not bad I guess for first night out:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcCz7D2X3CU

Then again, I hope I am past the point of being ultra-critical of Dickey. It's thrilling to me just to see him out there. How can anyone expect to hear the Dickey of 30 years ago?

[Edited on 5/16/2018 by robslob]

 

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 04:47 PM
quote:
tbomike. You don't like me do you. You don't like the FACT the last line up or any other line up can't match the original lineup. I'm going to say what I want on any thread as many times as I want. Don't like what I write? Don't read it. You must be one of a few I've encountered who think the last line up was the best version of the ABB. Only someone who never saw the original band hitting the note at The Fillmore East or West would make such a mistake. And I bet Warren and Derek agree with me. But you do it your way. I could care less.


I don't know why you would think I don't like you? I don't know you at all so what in the f would I like or not like.

 

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  posted on 5/16/2018 at 08:31 PM
quote:
quote:

Wade Tatangelo has always given Dickey great reviews, even on occasions he shouldn't have. He's Sarasota's music reporter and Dickey is a local legend, so I'm sure he avoids burning that bridge. I would.


Kind of see what you mean. I found Hot 'Lanta from last night and have to say I thought it was a bit sloppy. Not bad I guess for first night out:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rcCz7D2X3CU

Then again, I hope I am past the point of being ultra-critical of Dickey. It's thrilling to me just to see him out there. How can anyone expect to hear the Dickey of 30 years ago?


While I truly see both sides represented here, that was painful to watch

 

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  posted on 5/17/2018 at 11:28 PM
Anyone have photos to post from Dickey & Jaimo in Macon?
 

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  posted on 5/18/2018 at 02:09 PM
quote:
quote:
Least Anything Goes has still gotta pulse.Whippin Post is pathetic!Buncha same ol,same ol, 3 dollar word's & take's of how great it was when Hussein was prez.It's the same ol talking heads,dribblin the same ol jive.Long as ya cut on Trump ,your in the circle.But take up for the cat a smidge,& here come the same ol melon head's.I'd like to meet some of the goof ball's over there face to face.I bet their as boring & dumb looking as the content of their little college essay dribble's they post.


I want some of whatever LUKE's having.


Why? You need to halve your IQ points?

 

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  posted on 5/18/2018 at 02:19 PM
quote:
quote:

quote:

Least Anything Goes has still gotta pulse.Whippin Post is pathetic!Buncha same ol,same ol, 3 dollar word's & take's of how great it was when Hussein was prez.It's the same ol talking heads,dribblin the same ol jive.Long as ya cut on Trump ,your in the circle.But take up for the cat a smidge,& here come the same ol melon head's.I'd like to meet some of the goof ball's over there face to face.I bet their as boring & dumb looking as the content of their little college essay dribble's they post.



I want some of whatever LUKE's having.



Why? You need to halve your IQ points?



Hey, nobody every took hallucinogens to grow brain cells. That said, when your brain isn't working at full capacity, it probably isn't the best idea to broadcast that fact on the Internet. I've read that 5 times now and still can't figure out how he could have possibly NOT been tripping.

 

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  posted on 5/19/2018 at 04:39 PM
Many questions are answered.

https://www.jambase.com/article/dickey-betts-officially-returns-retirement- macon-photos-videos

 

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  posted on 5/19/2018 at 05:44 PM
Awesome review-sounds like a Fantastic show! too bad the videos are too shakey to watch but pictures are great!
 

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  posted on 5/19/2018 at 06:42 PM
quote:
Don't get it..there's barely anything posted about the show in Macon despite lots of people saying they were going. There's usually tons of comments here about everything going on like setlists,pics,video,etc. A few months ago there were tons of posts on Devon & Duanes concerts. This time-crickets!


A Gent M. Denison posted an enjoyable read to the FB Dickey Betts Fans page. He dug it!

Here’s my review of the Macon show. I’m sorry it’s a day later than promised, but after driving 500 miles, not sleeping for two days, and the euphoria of experiencing the show itself, I was exhausted. Yesterday I came home and crashed.
I’ll try to keep this as short as possible; but since many people have been asking those of us who were lucky enough to be in attendance to give some details, I want to try to get across the experience for those who couldn’t be there.
First, Macon itself. For those who’ve never been there, Macon is a quiet, laid-back town. It has a great vibe, but isn’t a hustling metropolis by any means—it’s just a nice, quiet, GA town, with a genuine hometown feel. Yesterday afternoon, Macon felt quite different. There was an air of building anticipation in the air, especially downtown near the auditorium. Seeing those busses parked outside made it real—Dickey was back. The feel of the crowd downtown was like watching a couple of thousand children after they’ve woken up on Christmas morning, right before they come running to open their presents. You knew something special was about to happen, and just felt blessed and amazed to be a part of it.
Devon Allman set the pace and the pulse with a blistering 50 minute shortened set in order to accommodate the gear swap for Dickey’s band and Dickey’s show. I’m familiar with his music, but I’ve never seen Devon live until last night. He is a commanding front-man, full of energy that demands you pay attention and get into the show. His presence is intense, more like his Uncle Duane as opposed to his laid-back father, Gregg. The band was perfectly tight. His voice was strong and his guitar playing superb. Duane joined them for roughly the final half of the set. Devon played Uncle Duane’s gold-top Les Paul for the last song and had some hijinks with the crowd where he walked off-stage at one point, poked his head out from behind the curtain a few times, vanished altogether, then appeared in the crowd, still playing Duane’s Les Paul. Duane was in on the gag, having an off-stage verbal exchange with Devon, then taking over on lead while Devon made his way into the crowd, out of sight of everyone behind the curtain and in the auditorium hallway. At one point toward the end of the show Devon—quite seriously and out of character from his semi-mischievous and assertive nature—said between songs that he just wanted to thank everyone for the love and support they’ve shown his family in the last year, an allude to the death of his father, Gregg. It was an honest, quiet, and raw moment; and of course it brought the house down with applause.
And now to Dickey’s show. The band took the stage to thunderous applause. Duane was, perhaps prophetically if not intentionally, first out—this was Dickey’s show, but eventually it will be the son who carries the father’s legacy. Dickey was last out, and once he was in eyesight the thunderous applause became volcanic. While everyone got ready onstage, the applause died down. Then, with the auditorium mostly silent, various voices from the crowd yelled out, “We love you, Dickey!” every few seconds. Dickey had his black Gibson SG strapped on and was at the mic by this point. After the proclamations from the crowd, Dickey look up briefly and quickly, then looked back down at his guitar and took one hand and pumped his Stetson hat up and down as if in acknowledgement of the love given to him before even the first note was played.
The band opened with the ABB classic Hot ‘Lanta. Once the first few notes were struck, the crowd went thunderous with applause again. It was finally, officially happening. Dickey mostly stared straight down at his SG; the only things visible were the top of his Stetson, a flash of his white beard, his Western shirt, his SG, and his brown cowboy boots. The first tune went a little wobbly in places, as the band found their bearings and adjusted to the acoustics from soundcheck with an empty auditorium to one filled with people. It wasn’t wildly noticeable, and didn’t deter from the energy in the hall. As they played Duane kept time with his head, smiling and nodding.
After Hot ‘Lanta, the applause was massive. Dickey looked up with a bit of surprise. I’m sure he expected a warm welcome—after all, this was Macon—but I don’t think he realized how important he is to us fans, how well he is loved, and how a few years away from the public eye could not possible delude all of that. Dickey gave a “thank you” and then they launched into Statesboro Blues to rafter-shaking applause. By the end of the song, you could tell Dickey was back. All doubt, nerves, and rust were shook off. He quickly relaxed, had a lot of fun, talked a lot to the crowd, and played more and more leads. He had a stool with him but didn’t spend much time sitting on it. If there was a long jam with other musicians taking the leads, he’d sit and happily play rhythm; but when it was time to sing or play his own leads, he came off of it and went right to the front of the stage. When he sang, it was Dickey. Even Blue Sky was perfect, and he held the high note at the end longer than usual, as if to defy his critics. With each song we saw more and more of his famous face; near the end of the show he quite often threw his head back with a big grin on his face, eyes closed, and just kept tearing the house down. Lord. I had hoped the show would be good. I never could have thought not only would it be good, but it would be the closest thing those of us who didn’t get to experience the Filmore East shows could come to that experience. I am not saying Dickey played the same as he did forty years ago, but I am saying the show was just as magical. Dickey didn’t come just to blow through some old classics; he came to give the fans a memorable experience, and he and his band did exactly that. There have been critics who said he should have stay retired, that he was too old, that he was out of shape both physically and musically. And, on top of the critics, there were the internet trolls, who have no issue with degrading Dickey but cannot back up their big talk with a sample of any of their own songs and performances spanning five decades. To use some Dickey-style language, all I have to say to any of them is: sorry **** s. I was there. It was epic. It was amazing. It was Dickey Betts.
I could hunt down a setlist and try to relay the energy and moments song by song, but I won’t do that. I think—hope—I’ve gotten the point across. I was going to try to keep a setlist written on my phone, but I was too lost in the show to remember to do it. Even looking back at the photos and video I took, I realize I took very little because I just couldn’t break myself away from what was happening onstage to force myself to watch it through the lens of a damn telephone. No way. I’d rather have the memories. And, Lord, what memories. As I said, I won’t try to go through the night beat by beat, but here are some highlights:
Dickey’s band was just amazing. Damon Fowler is an amazing guitarist and artist, and handled the slide work to perfection. He had a solo during Liz Reed that probably blistered the paint off the ceiling of the auditorium. Frankie Lombardi and Steve Camilleri did a dual drum solo during the same song that was just stunning to watch and hear. Mike Kach played quite a few leads on keys, and was an amazing stand-in for Gregg’s vocal-driven songs. Pedro Arevalo kept the rhythm section bouncing on bass, and got some solo time of his own, including channeling Berry Oakley to perfection on Whipping Post. He even had a sax player—forgive me for not recalling his name as I type this—that added some spice to a few songs, and there was an amazing few minutes when Dickey walked over to him and they played off each other and swapped licks.
And, on Whipping Post, the fans were treated to a shock of a reunion when Dickey introduced Jaimoe, who sat in on drums for the song. Dickey dedicated the song to Gregg. Then it was on. Dickey and Jaimoe hadn’t played together in eighteen years; and, while I’m sure they rehearsed a bit beforehand, it was just such a blessing to see them play together again. Eighteen years may as well have been eighteen seconds. Time doesn’t separate brothers. Jaimoe was as good as he ever was with his deceptively light, jazz-infused style yet with fifty tons of heart and soul behind each drum stroke.
Devon Allman came out and played acoustic guitar on Midnight Rider. And the legendary Bonnie Bramlett and her daughter Becca came out throughout the show to play tambourine, sing some backup, and generally keep the crowd going. Bonnie is one of my favorite singers, and I was thrilled to see her there. She and her late husband Delaney were an integral part of rock and roll. Eric Clapton was so taken with them and their music that he tossed his wall-to-wall sound, got some Fender Strats and a few small tweed amps, and literally changed his style while touring with them. If it were not for the Bramlett’s, we wouldn’t have gotten the Layla album, Clapton’s masterpiece featuring, of course, Duane Allman.
After an epic version of Liz Reed, Dickey announced that they were going to take a quick break and be back. When they came back they ended the show with an extended version of not some random song but Dickey’s classic, Jessica. It couldn’t have gotten any better.
My wife and I left the show hot, tired, and exhausted. As we got to the top of the stairs to the main floor she asked if I wanted to buy a t-shirt. I said no; I just wanted to beat some of the crowd out the doors. And then I saw Duane standing at his merchandise stand with very few people around. She looked at me and grinned—she knew I couldn’t pass up meeting him. So we walked over to his merchandise stand. I bought a baseball cap because I already have his album and I consider it rude to ask an artist to sign stuff without having bought anything. Then I asked if he’d sign my ticket and take a picture. He said, “Sure,” and motioned me to come behind the table next to him. I did, and then, suddenly, the table blew up with people gathering around, buying stuff and asking his merchandise handler and him questions. This went on for several minutes. I was starting to feel like a third wheel and even said to Duane, “It’s OK. It’s getting busy. Should I just go?” and he gently grabbed my arm and replied, “No. Just hang here.” So I spent several minutes standing next to Duane and making small chat with him while he worked the new crowd. I couldn’t believe it. He was perfectly nice to everyone who came to the line to have something signed, but he was adamant that I stay. The crowd eventually died down, but there was one woman who kept bending over to ask his merchandise handler questions and obstructing the shot of me with Duane, so my wife couldn’t get the shot of me standing next to him. (On an aside, my wife is a genius. She had already taken several shots of Duane and I mingling and talking, and when it was all over I came home with TWENTY-TWO photos of me and him!) Duane asked me, “Is she with you?” referring to the woman bending in the way. I said, “No, that’s my wife right there,” and pointed at the iPhone my wife was pointing at us. He replied, “So she’s in our way?” I laughed and said, “Yeah, I guess so.” Then Duane pointed at her, and said, “Hey!” She stopped talking, looked at him, and got out of the way. He wasn’t being a bit rude about it, almost playful, but he got the point across that I’d been waiting for several minutes and she had just busted into the line. My wife got it all recorded. Great stuff.
Rarely have I occupied the same room with so many talented folks. “Rock stars” come and go. Legends are another thing entirely. Legendary people don’t act like “rock stars.” They show up and do their job and keep working. The auditorium in Macon was filled with legends.
A final thanks to the bands, the fans, and Dickey. In a recent interview, Dickey was described as "lovable." He said, with amusement, that he had never been described with that word. Not to speak for others, but I feel as if our collective response would be, "You are now sir, and you always were." And we would go on to say, "Thank you for the music. But a thank you is not enough. The road goes on forever. We are all blessed to be voyeurs on your journey. We loved you then, we love you now; and we will love you for as far as that road extends, into eternity."

 

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  posted on 5/19/2018 at 07:01 PM
Thanks Fretsman for posting, that was certainly the show I saw.

It was so special to see Dickey and Jaimoe playing together again.

With Devon and Duane the road will go on.

 

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  posted on 5/20/2018 at 07:32 AM
I believe that most of the long-time, dyed-in-the-wool fans made the correct assessment of the show.

Please hear me correctly: Anybody who declares that Dickey was in "1972 condition and capability" is as far removed from their senses as anybody who showed up expecting the same. From a fan who has seen the band on a regular basis since its inception, I was happy that Mr. Betts showed up.

My expectations were ... reasonable. Thusly, I was not disappointed. The show was pretty much what I'd thought it would be. I'd go as far as to say that my expectations were even exceeded.

Please don't take any of this as an insult towards Dickey Betts or grumbling from a disappointed fan. I'm telling it like it is, here.

Dickey certainly had his "on" moments. His improvised solo during Whippin' Post was (for me) his most intense guitar playing for the night. The music flowed best when Dickey allowed his band to provide the engine. His solos were occasionally a little messy (74 years old with no significant rehearsal time will do this to anybody!). The most noticeable "problems" came whenever the (three) guitarists attempted the harmony lead-lines (the signature Allman Brothers sound!). In these instances, it was easy to hear that ... one of the guitarists was consistently late coming in - missing a note or two of the sequence along the way.

The audience was there for Dickey! I'd say that 90% of the folks there were unconditional Dickey Betts fans (present company included) who just wanted to see one of the true guitar legends one more time. There were others present who seemed to be studying the show as if they were scientists looking for signs of evolution or decay in a rare species.

The "Homecoming" aspect of the event was heartfelt. Seeing so many familiar faces (many who didn't seem to recognize me anymore! (sad face emoji) ) wandering the streets of Macon and dining at the Rookery/H&H was worth the trip! Hearing their commentary made for interesting conversation and discussion.

There was the guy we met on the sidewalk outside the "H" the next morning. After announcing that he, too was a musician - he went on to berate Dickey for "playing drunk off his ass!". I asked him why he thought Dickey was drunk and he said that he "knew" because he saw Bonnie Bramlett enter his bus carrying a big box filled with liquor bottles. He was the only person I met who was vocally angry over the show.

It was an amazing night of a musical homecoming!

 

____________________
Music is love, and love is music, if you know what I mean.
People who believe in music are the happiest people I've ever seen.

Bill Ector, Randy Stephens, Dan Hills and a guy named BobO who I never met - Forever in my heart!

 

Zen Peach



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  posted on 5/20/2018 at 08:02 AM
Sounds like it was a great time to me.

Glad everyone got to see old friends, celebrate and enjoying Dickey and the band playing classics.

Can't wait.

 

____________________
Chicago Black Hawks - next season.


 

Peach Master



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  posted on 5/20/2018 at 08:28 AM
no no, I was there, if Hot 'Lanta didn't record well, it was the room, it was easily one of the best Hot 'Lantas Ive witnessed, and I ve seen/heard my share. Enjoyed LIVE Brothers zillions of times, every rendition of the band except with Jack Pearson.

Heddy was too young and too ill, for anything other then her baby brother and sister's church concerts, the Jack Pearson years, and don't I wish those years had been better to the McFamily. We made up for it further down the road.

Am a fair judge, if Wade may be more glowing, kudos to him. I tell it like a saw/heard it.

If you want to know, did it take Dickey boy a few turns to warm up, Hell yes it did, it always had, for Dickey, Gregory, Duane, Berry Jaimoe , Butch . Anyone can copy cat, for chrisakes.

I posted my review of White Buffalo in the gb. was it ABB at the Academy of Music? at the Filmore? at Watkins Glen ? oh I LOVED Watkins glen no, it was the swan song of one of the greatest rock and rollers to ever live , baby, cherish these days.

 

A Peach Supreme



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  posted on 5/20/2018 at 03:43 PM
quote:
no no, I was there, if Hot 'Lanta didn't record well, it was the room, it was easily one of the best Hot 'Lantas Ive witnessed, and I ve seen/heard my share. Enjoyed LIVE Brothers zillions of times, every rendition of the band except with Jack Pearson.

Heddy was too young and too ill, for anything other then her baby brother and sister's church concerts, the Jack Pearson years, and don't I wish those years had been better to the McFamily. We made up for it further down the road.

Am a fair judge, if Wade may be more glowing, kudos to him. I tell it like a saw/heard it.

If you want to know, did it take Dickey boy a few turns to warm up, Hell yes it did, it always had, for Dickey, Gregory, Duane, Berry Jaimoe , Butch . Anyone can copy cat, for chrisakes.

I posted my review of White Buffalo in the gb. was it ABB at the Academy of Music? at the Filmore? at Watkins Glen ? oh I LOVED Watkins glen no, it was the swan song of one of the greatest rock and rollers to ever live , baby, cherish these days.



AMEN ^+++^

 

____________________

 

Peach Master



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Status: Offline

  posted on 5/20/2018 at 09:47 PM
Overall it was a very special 3 days in Macon

 
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