Thread: Ebola

LeglizHemp - 6/23/2014 at 10:47 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/06/23/health/ebola-virus-outbreak-west-africa/index .html?hpt=hp_t2

http://www.nbcnews.com/health/health-news/ebola-outbreak-tip-iceberg-expert s-say-n137081

Ebola virus causes outbreak of infectious dance tune
Trippy, electro-beat song created to help get message across about how to avoid incurable disease in Guinea and Liberia
Monica Mark in Lagos
theguardian.com, Tuesday 27 May 2014 10.30 EDT
http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/may/27/ebola-virus-outbreak-infectiou s-dance-tune

http://www.cdc.gov/vhf/ebola/outbreaks/guinea/

Ebola epidemic is 'out of control'
By Danielle Dellorto, CNN
updated 6:22 PM EDT, Mon June 23, 2014

(CNN) -- The deadly Ebola virus outbreak in West Africa has hit "unprecedented" proportions, according to relief workers on the ground.
"The epidemic is out of control," Dr. Bart Janssens, director of operations for Doctors Without Borders, said in statement.
There have been 567 cases and 350 deaths since the epidemic began in March, according to the latest World Health Organization figures.
Ebola virus outbreaks are usually confined to remote areas, making it easier to contain. But this outbreak is different; patients have been identified in 60 locations in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.
Officials believe the wide footprint of this outbreak is partly because of the close proximity between the jungle where the virus was first identified and cities such as Conakry. The capital in Guinea has a population of 2 million and an international airport.

People are traveling without realizing they're carrying the deadly virus. It can take between two and 21 days for someone to feel sick after they've been exposed.

Ebola is a violent killer. The symptoms, at first, mimic the flu: headache, fever, tiredness. What comes next sounds like something out of a horror movie: significant diarrhea and vomiting, while the virus shuts off the blood's ability to clot.
As a result, patients often suffer internal and external hemorrhaging. Many die in an average of 10 days.
"We have reached our limits," Janssens said.
Doctors Without Borders, also known as Médecins Sans Frontières, is the only aid organization treating people affected by the virus. Since March, they have sent more than 300 staff members and 40 tons of equipment and supplies to the region to help fight the epidemic.
Still, they warn, it's not enough.

"Despite the human resources and equipment deployed by MSF in the three affected countries, we are no longer able to send teams to the new outbreak sites."
The good news is that Ebola isn't as easily spread as one may think. A patient isn't contagious -- meaning they can't spread the virus to other people -- until they are already showing symptoms.

Health officials have urged residents to alert MSF or local physicians at the first sign of flu-like symptoms. While there is no cure or vaccine to treat Ebola, MSF has proved it doesn't have to be a death sentence if it's treated early.
Inside isolation treatment areas, doctors focus on keeping the patients hydrated with IV drips and other liquid nutrients. It's working. Ebola typically kills 90% of patients. This outbreak, the death rate has dropped to roughly 60%.
MSF says they'll continue to isolate and treat Ebola patients in West Africa with the resources they have available but urge for a "massive deployment" by regional governments and aid agencies to help stop the epidemic.
World Health Organization officials say they're planning high-level meeting for the Minister of Health in the subregion July 2 and 3 to discuss the deployment of additional resources and experts to the area.
The outbreak will be considered contained after 42 days with no new Ebola cases -- that's twice the incubation period.

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pops42 - 6/23/2014 at 11:54 PM

Scary sh!t.


LeglizHemp - 6/24/2014 at 12:24 AM

i just wanted to deliver the bad news 1st


BillyBlastoff - 6/24/2014 at 04:54 AM

Life sure is good in the good ol' USA.


Jerry - 6/24/2014 at 10:59 PM

quote:
Life sure is good in the good ol' USA.


All it takes is one infected person to walk through a crowded airport.
Try reading "Executive Orders" by Tom Clancy


LeglizHemp - 6/27/2014 at 01:12 PM

Bushmeat and the Ebola Outbreak in Liberia

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XasTcDsDfMg

West Africa is being plagued by a new outbreak of Ebola — a terrifying disease that causes its victims to bleed to death from the inside out. Ebola has no cure, and the latest epidemic is spreading fast.

VICE News visited Liberia, where many feel the new outbreak began, borne from the bushmeat markets of Lofa. Western scientists feel that the consumption and preparation of meat from monkeys, fruit bats, and other forest animals is behind the transmission of Ebola, and possibly a new supervirus, which if left uncontrolled could kill a third of the world's population.


LeglizHemp - 7/2/2014 at 01:11 PM

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/01/ebola-deaths-west-africa_n_5548344 .html

* West Africa Ebola outbreak already deadliest

* Health ministers meet in Accra to mull solutions

* Liberia warns against illegally harboring patients (Adds Liberia comments, updated graphics link)

By Tom Miles

GENEVA, July 1 (Reuters) - The number of deaths attributed to an epidemic of Ebola virus in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone stood at 467 by Monday, out of 759 known cases in total, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Tuesday.

The outbreak of the deadly disease is already the largest and deadliest ever, according to the WHO, which previously put the death toll at 399 as of June 23, out of 635 cases.

The 17 percent rise in deaths and 20 percent jump in cases in the space of a week will add urgency to an emergency meeting of 11 West African health ministers in Accra, Ghana on Wednesday and Thursday, which aims to coordinate a regional response.

In response to the outbreak, Liberian authorities have on Tuesday warned that anyone caught hiding suspected Ebola patients will be prosecuted Some families, faith healers and traditional doctors were reported to be removing patients from hospital for special prayers and traditional medicine.

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said in a statement that the crisis has become a national public health emergency, urging people to heed health guidelines.

"It is illegal under our public health law to expose the people to health hazard such as Ebola," Sirleaf said in a statement seen by Reuters on Tuesday.

"Let this warning go out, anyone found or reported to be holding suspected Ebola cases in homes or prayer houses will be prosecuted under the laws of Liberia," she said.

The outbreak in West Africa has left some of the world's poorest states, with porous borders and weak health systems undermined by war and misrule, grappling with one of the most lethal and contagious diseases on the planet.

The WHO said three key factors were contributing to the spread of the disease. One was the burial of victims in accordance with cultural practices and traditional beliefs in rural communities. Another was the dense population around the capital cities of Guinea and Liberia. The third was commercial and social activity along the borders of the three countries.

"Containment of this outbreak requires a strong response in the countries and especially along their shared border areas," the statement said.

The WHO figures include confirmed, probable and suspected cases.


LeglizHemp - 7/3/2014 at 09:58 PM

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-07-03/tekmira-ebola-drug-trial-placed-on -hold-by-u-s-fda.html

Tekmira’s Ebola Drug Trial Placed on Hold by U.S. FDA
By Caroline Chen and Makiko Kitamura Jul 3, 2014 4:10 PM ET

Human tests of Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp. (TKMR)’s treatment for Ebola, one of the world’s most lethal diseases, have been put on hold by U.S. regulators due to safety concerns.

The Food and Drug Administration has requested additional information to ensure the drug is safe at higher doses, the company said today in a statement. The therapy is in the first of three stages of clinical trials usually required by regulators for approval.

Tekmira will “continue our dialogue with the FDA, provided for under our fast-track status, in order to advance the development of this important therapeutic agent,” Tekmira’s Chief Executive Officer Mark Murray said in the statement. The company didn’t say how long the hold was expected to last, and spokeswoman Julie Rezler didn’t immediately respond to a phone call requesting comment.

Shares of the Vancouver-based drugmaker fell 16 percent to $11.63 at the close in New York, the biggest single-day decline since April 14.

The Ebola virus kills as many as 90 percent of those it strikes, and the latest outbreak in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone is the worst on record, resulting in more than 450 deaths. The World Health Organization has said the outbreak may last another three to four months.

Ebola Research

Despite the deadly nature of the disease, the relative rarity of outbreaks and their confinement to primarily rural areas of poor African nations make Ebola an unattractive target for big drugmakers.

Instead, much of the research in Ebola treatments has been funded by the U.S. government. Tekmira said its drug, an RNA-based therapy, is being developed under a $140 million contract with the U.S. Department of Defense.

Among the most promising experimental drugs are antibody cocktails. One is being developed at Canada’s National Microbiology Laboratory, though it needs more work before it can be tested in humans, according to Public Health Canada.

Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., a closely held company in San Diego, is developing another, along with the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, the National Institutes of Health and the U.S. Defense Threat Reduction Agency.

To contact the reporters on this story: Caroline Chen in New York at cchen509@bloomberg.net; Makiko Kitamura in London at mkitamura1@bloomberg.net


LeglizHemp - 7/16/2014 at 02:29 PM

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/16/ebola-deaths-west-africa_n_5589655 .html

Ebola Death Toll In West Africa Jumps To 603

DAKAR/HAVANA, July 15 (Reuters) - The death toll from the world's worst ever Ebola outbreak in West Africa has risen to 603 since February, with at least 68 deaths reported from three countries in the region in the last week alone, the World Health Organization said on Tuesday.

WHO said there were 85 new cases between July 8-12, highlighting continued high levels of transmission. International and local medics were struggling to get access to communities as many people feared outsiders were spreading rather than fighting Ebola.

"It's very difficult for us to get into communities where there is hostility to outsiders," WHO spokesman Dan Epstein told a news briefing in Geneva. "We still face rumors, and suspicion and hostility ... People are isolated, they're afraid, they're scared."

Sierra Leone recorded the highest number of deaths, which include confirmed, probable and suspect cases of Ebola, with 52. Liberia reported 13 and Guinea 3, according to the WHO figures.

Epstein said the main focus in the three countries is tracing people who have been exposed to others with Ebola and monitoring them for the 21-day incubation period to see if they were infected.

"It's probably going to be several months before we are able to get a grip on this epidemic," Epstein added.

Ebola causes fever, vomiting, bleeding and diarrhea and was first detected in then Zaire, now Democratic Republic of Congo, in the mid-1970s. Spread through contact with blood and body fluids of infected people or animals, it is one of the world's deadliest viruses, killing up to 90 percent of those infected.

Speaking from Havana, WHO Director-General Margaret Chan called the outbreak the world's worst ever by number of cases, saying, "The situation is serious but not out of control yet."

The WHO was mobilizing political, religious and local leaders in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea to create a better welcome for medical professionals attempting to treat victims, Chan said, while also coordinating responses from the three affected countries and eight neighbors that have experienced Ebola.

"Sometimes the challenge for us is countries like to do disease control their way. But I think this is one such situation where countries must come together and adopt a similar approach to deal with a very dangerous disease," Chan said.

The organization was also consulting with anthropologies to help suspend local customs such as eating bush meat or hugging and kissing Ebola victims at their funerals, which can transmit the disease, Chan said.

The outbreak started in Guinea's remote southeast but has spread across the region's porous borders despite aid workers scrambling to help some of the world's weakest health systems tackle a deadly, infectious disease.

In Sierra Leone and Guinea, experts believe scores of patients are being hidden as relatives and friends believe hospitalization is a "death sentence". In Liberia, health workers have been chased away by armed gangs. (Reporting by David Lewis and Daniel Trotta; Editing by Bate Felix, Ralph Boulton and Bernard Orr)


LeglizHemp - 7/23/2014 at 01:15 PM

http://www.voanews.com/content/reu-sierra-leone-chief-ebola-doctor-contract s-virus/1963389.html

Sierra Leone's Chief Ebola Doctor Contracts Virus
Reuters
July 23, 2014 7:37 AM

FREETOWN —
The head doctor fighting the deadly tropical virus Ebola in Sierra Leone has himself caught the disease, the government said.

The 39-year-old Sheik Umar Khan, hailed as a “national hero” by the health ministry, was leading the fight to control an outbreak that has killed 206 people in the West African country. Ebola kills up to 90 percent of those infected and there is no cure or vaccine.
Across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, more than 600 people have died from the illness, according to the World Health Organization, placing great strain on the health systems of some of Africa's poorest countries.

Khan, a Sierra Leonean virologist credited with treating more than 100 Ebola victims, has been transferred to a treatment ward run by medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres, according to the statement released late on Tuesday by the president's office.

A Health Minister Miatta Kargbo called Khan a national hero and said she would “do anything and everything in my power to ensure he survives.”

Khan told Reuters in late June that he was worried about contracting Ebola. “I am afraid for my life, I must say, because I cherish my life,” he said in an interview, showing no signs of ill health at the time.

“Health workers are prone to the disease because we are the first port of call for somebody who is sickened by disease. Even with the full protective clothing you put on, you are at risk.”

Three days ago, three nurses working in the same Ebola treatment center alongside Khan died from the disease.

The Ebola outbreak started in Guinea's remote southeast in February and has since spread across the region. Symptoms of the highly infectious disease are diarrhea, vomiting and internal and external bleeding.


DougMacKenzie - 7/24/2014 at 09:13 PM

Ths is a nassty bug. Hope they can get a handle on it soon. Thanks for keeping track of this story.


LeglizHemp - 7/24/2014 at 09:53 PM

no prob. i've been following it since march but hoped it would die out. i saw on a nigerian website this morning that the 1st case may have showed up there but waiting for confirmation. even though its hard to transmit, things don't seem to be getting better.


LeglizHemp - 7/25/2014 at 01:40 AM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/24/opinion/garrett-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t3

Why an Ebola epidemic is spinning out of control
By Laurie Garrett, Special to CNN
updated 2:03 PM EDT, Thu July 24, 2014

Editor's note: Laurie Garrett is senior fellow for global health at the Council on Foreign Relations and a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist.

(CNN) -- The Ebola epidemic now raging across three countries in West Africa is three-fold larger than any other outbreak ever recorded for this terrible disease; the only one to have occurred in urban areas and to cross national borders; and officially urgent and serious. At least 1,090 people have contracted the awful disease this year, though the epidemic's true scope is unknown because of widespread opposition to health authorities in afflicted Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

This week, 39-year-old physician Sheik Umar Khan -- labeled the country's hero for his brave leadership of the epidemic fight -- was hospitalized with Ebola, adding yet another public fear: that even the doctors cannot escape the disease.

But as terrifying as Ebola is, the virus has been controlled in the past, and can be again. The current crisis, which threatens an 11-nation region of Africa that includes the continent's giant, Nigeria, is not a biological or medical one so much as it is political. The three nations in Ebola's thrall need technical support from outsiders but will not succeed in stopping the virus until each nation's leaders embrace effective governance.

As was the case in Kikwit, Zaire, in 1995 -- an Ebola outbreak I personally was in as a journalist -- there is no vaccine or cure for the disease. The key to stopping its spread is rapid identification of the sick; removal of the ailing and deceased from their homes; and quarantine and high hygiene measures to prevent transmission of the virus to family members and health care workers.

In the absence of such measures, Ebola will kill upwards of 70% of those it infects, as the virus punches holes in veins, causing massive internal hemorrhaging and bleeding from the eyes, ears, mouth and all other orifices.

Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are among the poorest, least governed states in the world. About half of the nations' adults are illiterate. The 11.75 million people of Guinea have a per capita annual income of merely $527, and their combined male/female life expectancy is 58 years. In 2011, the government of President Alpha Conde spent $7 on average per capita on health.

Life is no better for the 4.2 million people living in neighboring Liberia, where per capita income is $454, life expectancy is 62 years and the government of President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf spends $18 per capita on health. In Sierra Leone, the 6 million residents have a per capita income of $809 per year, life expectancy is merely 46 years, and the government of the President, Dr. Ernest Bai Koroma, spent $13 per capita last year on health.

Since Ebola first broke out in March in Guinea, fear has gripped the region, coupled with suspicion and wild rumors. Some have proclaimed the epidemic "divine retribution" for past sins. In April, Guinean health officials failed to quarantine an Ebola patient who reportedly spread the virus from a remote area to the capital -- a lapse that undermined government credibility.

In April, a mob claiming that foreigners were spreading diseases attacked a Doctors Without Borders clinic in rural Guinea and forced the Nobel Peace Prize-winning group to abandon its mission. The charity returned only after it had negotiated its safety with local religious leaders. In the capital city of Conakry, families have been hiding their ailing relatives.

Even the local Red Cross was forced to abandon a part of the country after men brandishing knives surrounded them. And in one district, police fired tear gas at a mob that was trying to raid the morgue in order to give their loved ones proper burials, despite the risk of contagion.

As the epidemic spread to Sierra Leone in May, brought in by a traditional healer who tended to ailing Guineans and then returned home, similar problems surfaced. Family members defied a local quarantine, thereby spreading infection. By the end of May, authorities were losing track of Ebola sufferers amid widespread fleeing from health facilities; the toll of missing patients approached 60 by June.

Some local leaders spread rumors that "the white people" were conducting experiments, infecting Sierra Leonians or cutting off people's limbs. Doctors Without Borders warned that widespread belief that Ebola does not exist threatened to spread the disease regionally. Today the word "Ebola" carries so much stigma that few ailing individuals even seek diagnosis.

By the end of June, the epidemic was exploding in Liberia, fueled by the same sorts of denial and wild rumors that were rampant in Sierra Leone and Guinea. In one county, men with weapons chased off government health workers.

Today, the World Health Organization is officially loath to say so, but under these circumstances, this epidemic is beyond anybody's control.

Nobody, in any culture, relishes having their ailing loved ones removed from a family's care, or their bodies hauled off to ignominious mass graves. But the violent reaction to such measures in West Africa is far more extreme than anything that has occurred in other Ebola crises since the virus's first appearance in Zaire in 1976.

This should come as no surprise to anybody with a modicum of knowledge of recent history.
The nations of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone have a shared, brutal history of civil wars that since 1989 have left more than 400,000 people dead, displaced half a million people from their traditional homes, seen rape used as a weapon against tens of thousands of girls and women, and put Liberia's former President behind bars as a war criminal.

One of the most heinous features of the 1989-to-2005 wars was public amputation, typically carried out by child soldiers. The violence began in 1980 when Samuel Doe killed President William Tolbert and then tyrannized Liberia for a decade, growing rich off its diamond trade.

In 1990, rebels invaded the country from Ivory Coast, captured Doe, tortured him, dragged him naked through the streets of Monrovia, and then executed him. Charles Taylor took over the nation, running it until 2003. Taylor, in turn, helped his comrade Foday Sankoh seize control of Sierra Leone, and they systematically exploited their nations' mines, leading to the United Nations term "blood diamonds."

What you need to know about the deadliest ever outbreak

With help from Guinea, a second civil war started in 1999 in Liberia, eventually engaging multiple warring factions, each more brutal than the other. It spilled over into Sierra Leone and was egged on by military elements in Nigeria. By 2000, all three of the now-Ebola-torn countries were embroiled. Taylor fled into exile in Nigeria in 2003, and both he and Sankoh faced U.N. war crimes trials. Sankoh died of a heart attack before his trial; Taylor is now imprisoned.

In these three nations, few families have not experienced murders, rapes, torture, maiming, loss of homes and death. Fear, suspicion, poverty, pain and superstition are the norm, the noise that everybody lives with, every minute of their lives. Ebola is simply a new scream heard above that terrible background din.

The challenge today in these barely functioning states is to find ways to lower the overall noise, focus on stopping the Ebola virus, and bring governance and peace to three countries that have rarely experienced either.


LeglizHemp - 7/25/2014 at 01:24 PM

this still isn't confirmed yet

http://www.nairaland.com/1828813/ebola-really-nigeria-what-it

Is Ebola Really In Nigeria? What If It Is

So far all we have heard is, its possibly true ... what if its true? The only way to kick it back out of this country is knowledge, so this article is basically going to give you insight on how to deal with the Ebola epidemic

Ebola virus is basically a virus picked up from infected monkeys and fruit bats by coming in contact with their body fluids(blood, mucus and saliva). Human to human infection can also be transferred by coming in contact with Infected individual's body fluids.

THE LIBERIAN....

This guy came into the country 5 days ago probably shook and hugged a number of people on his way here and the air plane he entered? I don't even want to think about what went on there so the point is if ONE person is suspected to have EBOLA we all should be on guard.

http://www.nairaland.com/1828664/liberian-man-first-ebola-case

Mr. Patrick Sawyer, a WASH consultant at the Ministry of Finance, who had been quarantined since arriving Lagos, Nigeria on Sunday, July 20, 2014 with symptoms of the Ebola virus, has died .

A Liberian government official, speaking on condition of anonymity said the news of Sawyer’s death was relayed to Liberia by the Nigerian embassy, in the early hours of Friday, July 25, 2014.

The Lagos government health authorities announced on Thursday, July 24, 2014 that Sawyer was being tested for the deadly Ebola virus.

Sawyer’s death is the first recorded case of one of the world’s deadliest diseases in Nigeria, Africa’s biggest economy and most populous nation, with 170 million people.

Ebola has killed 632 people across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since an outbreak began in February, straining a string of weak health systems despite international help.


LeglizHemp - 7/25/2014 at 01:28 PM

http://uk.reuters.com/article/2014/07/25/us-health-ebola-africa-idUKKBN0FU1 DB20140725

First Ebola victim in Sierra Leone capital on the run
By Umaru Fofana
FREETOWN Fri Jul 25, 2014 2:15pm BST

(Reuters) - Sierra Leone officials appealed for help on Friday to trace the first known resident in the capital with Ebola whose family forcibly removed her from a Freetown hospital after testing positive for the deadly disease.

Radio stations in Freetown, a city of around 1 million inhabitants, broadcast the appeal on Friday to locate a woman who tested positive for the disease that has killed 660 people across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since an outbreak was first identified in February.

"Saudatu Koroma of 25 Old Railway Line, Brima Lane, Wellington," the announcement said. "She is a positive case and her being out there is a risk to all. We need the public to help us locate her."

Koroma, 32, a resident of the densely populated Wellington neighborhood, had been admitted to an isolation ward while blood samples were tested for the virus, Health ministry spokesman Sidi Yahya Tunis. The results came back on Thursday.

"The family of the patient stormed the hospital and forcefully removed her and took her away," Tunis said. "We are searching for her."

Fighting one of the world's deadliest diseases is straining the region's weak health systems, while a lack of information and suspicion of medical staff has led many to shun treatment.

DOZENS UNACCOUNTED FOR

Earlier this year, a man in Freetown tested positive for Ebola although he is believed to have caught it elsewhere.

According to health ministry data and officials, dozens of people confirmed by laboratory tests to have Ebola are now unaccounted for in Sierra Leone, where the majority of cases have been recorded in the country's east.

While international medical organizations have deployed experts to the field in an attempt to contain the outbreak, the World Health Organisation (WHO) said poor health infrastructure and a lack of manpower were hindering their efforts.

"We're seeing many of these facilities simply don't have enough people to provide the constant level of care needed," WHO spokesman Paul Garwood told a news briefing in Geneva on Friday.

There is no cure or vaccine for Ebola, which causes diarrhea, vomiting and internal and external bleeding. It can kill up to 90 percent of those infected, although the mortality rate of the current outbreak is around 60 percent.

The West African outbreak is the first time that Ebola, which was first discovered in what is now Democratic Republic of Congo in 1976, has appeared in heavily populated urban areas and international travel hubs.

Cases have already been confirmed in Conakry and Monrovia, the capital cities of Guinea and Liberia.

On Thursday authorities in Nigeria announced that they were testing a Liberian man for Ebola after he collapsed upon arrival at an airport in Lagos, the country's commercial capital and a mega-city of 21 million people.


LeglizHemp - 7/25/2014 at 03:46 PM

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-07-25/ebola-orphans-flee-sierra-leone-fa rms-as-cocoa-and-peanuts-rot.html

Ebola Orphans Flee Sierra Leone Farms as Cocoa and Rice Rot
By With assistance from Morgane Lapeyre Jul 25, 2014 5:10 AM ET

By Silas Gbandia

July 25 (Bloomberg) – The deadliest outbreak of Ebola on record is forcing farmers and their families to flee cocoa, rice and peanut plantations in northeastern Sierra Leone, where agriculture makes up more than half of the nation’s economy.

Output of the chocolate-making ingredient will drop this year and peanuts and rice, a staple, will be left unharvested, Edmond Saidu, district agriculture officer in Kailahun District, said in an interview last week. The area borders Guinea, where the disease was first reported in March, and Liberia, which has confirmed cases of the hemorrhagic fever that has no cure or treatment.

“Ebola has left with us with a high number of orphans who cannot take care of themselves and family plantations at this time,” Brima Kendor, a plantation owner and spokesman for the local chief in Kissi Tongi, Kailahun district, said in an interview. “This is the time to rehabilitate the cocoa farms but we can’t do that now.”

Abandoned farms threaten to curb economic growth in a country struggling to rebuild after a 10-year civil war that ended in 2002 and left the nation’s infrastructure in ruins. Agriculture makes up about 57 percent of the $4.9 billion economy, according 2011 World Bank data, the most recent figures available. The virus will probably spread for four more months in West Africa, where more than 600 people have died since the fever was reported in March in Guinea, according to the World Health Organization.

Before the outbreak, the central bank had cut borrowing costs in half since 2012, inflation had slowed to below 10 percent and the economy was poised to expand 14 percent this year. Sierra Leone started exporting iron ore, the raw material for steel, in 2011.

Ritual burial practices, poor hygiene and lack of adequate medical care has made controlling the spread of the disease difficult in the border region of dense forest between Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia, according to WHO. Sierra Leone has recorded 146 deaths from Ebola and 435 confirmed cases, the Ministry of Health said today in an e-mailed statement.

Farmers harvest cocoa and coffee in the districts of Kailahun, Kenema and Kono. Kailahun, where most of the Ebola cases have been confirmed, is the largest producer of cocoa in Sierra Leone and agriculture is the major economic activity.

Total production of the chocolate ingredient will be about 10,000 metric tons in the 12 months that end in September, according to the The International Cocoa Organization. Ivory Coast, the largest producer in the world, has output of 1.6 million tons.

“This is the plowing season especially for swamp rice cultivation, and this is also the time for the first harvesting of cocoa in the rains,” Saidu, the agriculture officer in Kailahun, said. “But much is not happening.”

Some international companies have refused to visit the area to buy the seed, Henry Yamba Kamara, managing director of the state-owned producer and buyer Sierra Leone Produce Marketing Company, said by phone.

“The buyers have refused to go in,” Kamara said. “The outcome will be either the cocoa will rot or nobody will be there to buy which will lead to a drop in exports.”


LeglizHemp - 7/27/2014 at 12:08 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/27/world/africa/ebola-american-doctor-infected/i ndex.html?hpt=hp_t2

American doctor in Liberia infected with Ebola
By Joe Sutton and Holly Yan, CNN
updated 3:41 AM EDT, Sun July 27, 2014

(CNN) -- An American doctor trying to quell the Ebola outbreak in Liberia is now infected with the virus, the organization for which he works said.

Dr. Kent Brantly is now hospitalized and undergoing treatment at an isolation center, the Christian humanitarian group Samaritan's Purse said.

The 33-year-old doctor had been treating Ebola patients and started feeling ill, Samaritan's Purse spokeswoman Melissa Strickland said. Once he started noticing the symptoms last week, Brantly isolated himself.

His Ebola infection was confirmed Saturday.
Brantly, the medical director for Samaritan Purse's Ebola Consolidated Case Management Center in Monrovia, Liberia, has been in the country since last October, Strickland said.

"When the Ebola outbreak hit, he took on responsibilities with our Ebola direct clinical treatment response, but he was serving in a missionary hospital in Liberia prior to his work with Ebola patients," she said.

Deadliest Ebola outbreak

Health officials say the current Ebola outbreak, centered in West Africa, is the deadliest ever.

As of July 20, some 1,093 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia are thought to have been infected by Ebola since its symptoms were first observed four months ago, according to the World Health Organization.

Testing confirmed the Ebola virus in 786 of those cases; 442 of those people died.

Of the 1,093 confirmed, probable and suspected cases, 660 people have died.
And there are fears the virus could spread to the Africa's most populous country, Nigeria.

Last week, a Liberian man hospitalized with Ebola in Lagos died, Nigerian Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu said.
Lagos, the largest city in Nigeria, has a population of more than 20 million people.

The man arrived at Lagos airport on July 20 and was isolated in a local hospital after showing symptoms associated with the virus. He told officials that he had no direct contact with anyone with the virus nor attended the burial of anyone who died of Ebola.
Another doctor infected
Confirmation of the death in Lagos followed news that a doctor who has played a key role in fighting the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone is infected with the disease, according to that country's Ministry of Health.

Dr. Sheik Humarr Khan is being treated by the French aid group Medecins Sans Frontieres -- also known as Doctors Without Borders -- in Kailahun, Sierra Leone, agency spokesman Tim Shenk said.

Before falling ill, Khan had been overseeing Ebola treatment and isolation units at Kenema Government Hospital, about 185 miles east of the capital, Freetown.

Ebola typically kills 90% of those infected, but the death rate in this outbreak has dropped to roughly 60% thanks to early treatment.
What is Ebola, and why does it kill?
Spread by bodily fluids
Officials believe that the Ebola outbreak has taken such a strong hold in West Africa due to the proximity of the jungle -- where the virus originated -- to Conakry, Guinea, which has a population of 2 million.

Because symptoms don't immediately appear, the virus can easily spread as people travel around the region. Once infected with the virus, many people die in an average of 10 days as the blood fails to clot and hemorrhaging occurs.

The disease isn't contagious until symptoms appear. Symptoms include fever, headache and fatigue. At that point, the Ebola virus is spread via bodily fluids.


LeglizHemp - 7/28/2014 at 01:42 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/07/28/world/africa/ebola-epidemic-west-africa-g uinea.html?_r=0

Fear of Ebola Breeds a Terror of Physicians
By ADAM NOSSITERJULY 27, 2014

KOLO BENGOU, Guinea — Eight youths, some armed with slingshots and machetes, stood warily alongside a rutted dirt road at an opening in the high reeds, the path to the village of Kolo Bengou. The deadly Ebola virus is believed to have infected several people in the village, and the youths were blocking the path to prevent health workers from entering.

“We don’t want any visitors,” said their leader, Faya Iroundouno, 17, president of Kolo Bengou’s youth league. “We don’t want any contact with anyone.” The others nodded in agreement and fiddled with their slingshots.

Singling out the international aid group Doctors Without Borders, Mr. Iroundouno continued, “Wherever those people have passed, the communities have been hit by illness.”

Health workers here say they are now battling two enemies: the unprecedented Ebola epidemic, which has killed more than 660 people in four countries since it was first detected in March, and fear, which has produced growing hostility toward outside help. On Friday alone, health authorities in Guinea confirmed 14 new cases of the disease.

Workers and officials, blamed by panicked populations for spreading the virus, have been threatened with knives, stones and machetes, their vehicles sometimes surrounded by hostile mobs. Log barriers across narrow dirt roads block medical teams from reaching villages where the virus is suspected. Sick and dead villagers, cut off from help, are infecting others.

“This is very unusual, that we are not trusted,” said Marc Poncin, the emergency coordinator in Guinea for Doctors Without Borders, the main group fighting the disease here. “We’re not stopping the epidemic.”

Efforts to monitor it are grinding to a halt because of “intimidation,” he said. People appear to have more confidence in witch doctors.

Health officials say the epidemic is out of control, moving back and forth across the porous borders of Guinea and neighboring Sierra Leone and Liberia — often on the backs of the cheap motorcycles that ply the roads of this region of green hills and dense forest — infiltrating the lively open-air markets, overwhelming weak health facilities and decimating villages.

It was in this rural area, 400 miles over bad roads from Guinea’s capital, Conakry, where the outbreak was first spotted, and where it has hit hardest. More than 80 percent of those infected have died in this region, and Guinea has recorded more than twice as many deaths as the other countries.

In Koundony, more than one-eighth of the population, including the headman, are dead; many others have fled.

There is no known cure for the virus, which causes raging fever, vomiting, diarrhea and uncontrolled bleeding in about half the cases and up to 90 percent of the time, rapid death. Merely touching an infected person, or the body of a victim, is dangerous; coming into contact with blood, vomit or feces can be deadly.

Now the fear of aid workers, principally from Doctors Without Borders and the Red Cross, is helping to spread the disease, health officials say, creating a secondary crisis.

Continue reading the main story

Villagers flee at the sight of a Red Cross truck. When a Westerner passes, villagers cry out, “Ebola, Ebola!” and run away.

This month, Doctors Without Borders classified 12 villages in Guinea as “red,” meaning they might harbor Ebola but were inaccessible for safety reasons.

As recently as April, the epidemic seemed to be under control. But in the past two weeks, its center appeared to have shifted across the border to Sierra Leone, where most of the new dead were being recorded. The sick are being hidden and the dead buried, without any protection.

Last week, the Sierra Leone Health Ministry reported that its lead doctor fighting Ebola had contracted the disease, and the virus had spread to a fourth country, with a confirmed fatality in Nigeria. Over the weekend, an aid organization working in Liberia, Samaritan’s Purse, said that two Americans, a doctor who was treating Ebola patients and an aid worker on a case management team, had tested positive for the virus. And the Liberian government said Sunday that one of its most high-profile doctors had died of Ebola, according to The Associated Press.

Back in Guinea, in the village of Wabengou, residents placed a tree in the road to block outsiders. They also attacked an official delegation from Conakry, rushing its cars, banging on the vehicles and brandishing machetes, according to Doctors Without Borders.

“We don’t want them in there at all,” said Wabengou’s chief, Marcel Dambadounou. “We don’t accept their presence at all. They are the transporters of the virus in these communities.”

He was surrounded by grim-looking men from Wabengou, standing at a crossroads on the way to his village; none of them demurred.

“We are absolutely afraid, and that’s why we are avoiding contact with everybody,” he said, “the whole world.”

Doctors Without Borders has set up an emergency treatment center in the regional capital, Guéckédou, but a nurse there said the center had diminishing appeal.

“Here, if the people come in, they don’t leave alive,” said the nurse, Fadima Diawara.

It may not help win confidence that the medical teams wear top-to-toe suits and masks, burning much of the outfit after helping a patient.

The wariness against outside intervention has deep roots. This part of Guinea, known as the Forest Region, where more than 200 people have already died of the disease, is known for its strong belief in traditional religion. The dictator who ruled Guinea with an iron fist for decades, Ahmed Sékou Touré, was only partly successful in a 1960s campaign to stamp out these beliefs, despite mass burnings of fetishes.

Addressing villagers this month in Bawa, where a woman had just died, the regional prefect from Guéckédou, Mohammed Cinq Keita, warned: “There is no root, no leaf, no animal that can cure you. Don’t be fooled.”

Near the border with Sierra Leone this month, Doctors Without Borders discovered an Ebola patient who had been privately “treated” in the village of Teldou and then returned to his relatives in another village, possibly infecting untold others.

Continue reading the main story

Continue reading the main story

“Extremely, extremely concerning,” said Sylvie Jonckheere, the charity’s doctor on the scene. A colleague in full gear lectured the villagers of Teldou as the rain started, but was met with indifference or hostile stares; some turned their backs on him.

As the aid workers drove off, the private nurse who administered a shot to the Ebola patient defended his treatment. “I couldn’t say that he had the illness,” said the nurse, Eduard Leno. “His body was hot, that’s all.”

Asked why the patient had not been sent to the clinic in Guéckédou, he said angrily: “We are in the bush here. You can’t just send someone away. How will society view you?”

Local officials have begun a campaign to open the closed villages — there have even been some recent arrests in Kolo Bengou — but in tiny Koundony, fear is palpable.

On a recent day, a Red Cross truck drove up to the cemetery to deliver the body of Marie Condé, 14, wrapped in plastic sheeting.

As the body was carried off the truck, a high-pitched wail pierced the country stillness. “There is no cure!” a woman cried. “There is no cure!”

The gravedigger, Marie’s half brother Famhan Condé, 26, was sweating as he heaved shovels of dirt. The grave, he said, would be the 26th he had dug since the epidemic began.

“We’re all scared here,” he said. “There’s no solution. We can do nothing. Only God can save us.”


LeglizHemp - 7/28/2014 at 10:33 PM

http://www.indystar.com/story/news/2014/07/28/indy-mom-son-ebola-sought-mis sionary/13282057/

An Indianapolis woman whose son contracted Ebola while working in Liberia says family members are praying for his recovery.

Dr. Kent Brantly is the medical director for the Ebola care center of the aid group Samaritan's Purse in the Liberian capital of Monrovia.

Dr. David Mcray said Brantly had been working for months when he contracted the disease. Mcray said Brantly has told him he is "terrified."

Brantly's prognosis is grave, Mcray said. The doctor is suffering fever, headache and abdominal pain in an isolation unit for Ebola patients on the outskirts of Liberia's capital.

"We're just trusting God for his life," Jan Brantly, said. "We're praying, and we're sustained by our faith."

The 33-year-old Brantly, who is married and has two children, was talking with his doctors and working on his computer while being treated, said Samaritan's Purse spokeswoman Melissa Strickland. He is in stable and very serious condition, said Samaritan's Purse Vice President Ken Isaacs.

Jan Brantly said her son had wanted to be a medical missionary from an early age. The Indianapolis Heritage Christian High School graduate began going on mission trips while young and has also worked in Uganda and Tanzania, she said.

Brantly graduated from the Indiana University School of Medicine in 2009, a school spokeswoman said. She said Brantly performed humanitarian work while still in medical school, working with impoverished, inner-city residents.

Brantly volunteered to fight Ebola in Africa soon after finishing his hospital residency in Texas.

He was being treated in the Monrovia hospital where he worked. "We are hopeful, but he is certainly not out of the woods yet," said Strickland. Early treatment improves a patient's chances of survival, and Brantly recognized his own symptoms and began receiving care immediately, she said.

There is no known cure for the highly contagious virus, which is one of the deadliest in the world. At least 1,201 people have been infected in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, according to the World Health Organization, and 672 have died. Besides 129 Liberian fatalities, 319 people have died in Guinea and 224 in Sierra Leone.

Medical staff are at the highest risk of contracting the virus because of their proximity to patients. Health workers attending to the patient should wear gloves, gowns and face visors to prevent contact between the patient's bodily fluids and their own mucus membranes, such as the eyes, mouth, nose and ears, said David Heymann, a professor at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine who has studied Ebola since 1976.

Strickland called Brantly "meticulous," saying that's why he was given the job. "We have every confidence that those protocols were not breached," she said. The group is investigating how Brantly may have been exposed.

The Associated Press and Bloomberg News contributed to this report.


ScottyVII - 7/29/2014 at 04:38 PM

A dear friend of mine who works for the CDC is over there right now and she told me that her close friend Dr. Kent Brantly has been infected and is expected to die. I wonder what the global implication will be from this.


BillyBlastoff - 7/29/2014 at 07:07 PM

I find it very difficult to read about this epidemic. This is the kind of news story that should be getting top billing, but because the topic is so uncomfortable, and frankly so scary, the major news outlets are not providing coverage.

The doctors who are risking their lives are real heroes. The entire world should join in the effort to eradicate the disease and get these people help.


ScottyVII - 7/29/2014 at 08:56 PM

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/29/ebola-doctor-dead-sheik-umar-khan_ n_5630878.html

FREETOWN, July 29 (Reuters) - The doctor leading Sierra Leone's fight against the worst Ebola outbreak on record died from the virus on Tuesday, the country's chief medical officer said.

The death of Sheik Umar Khan, who was credited with treating more than 100 patients, follows the deaths of dozens of local health workers and the infection of two American medics in neighboring Liberia, highlighting the dangers faced by staff trying to halt the disease's spread across West Africa.

Ebola is believed to have killed 672 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone since the outbreak began in February, according to the World Health Organization. The contagious disease, which has no known cure, has symptoms that include vomiting, diarrhea and internal and external bleeding.

The 39-year-old Khan, hailed as a "national hero" by the Health Ministry, had been moved to a treatment ward run by the medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres in the far north of Sierra Leone.

He died on Tuesday afternoon, less than a week after his diagnosis was announced, and on the same day that President Ernest Bai Koroma was due to visit his treatment center in the northeastern town of Kailahun.

"It is a big and irreparable loss to Sierra Leone as he was the only specialist the country had in viral haemorrhagic fevers," said the chief medical officer, Brima Kargbo.

Weak health systems are struggling to contain the disease despite international help ranging from doctors to safety equipment.

The West African airline Asky has suspended flights to and from Sierra Leone and Liberia as concern over the spread of the virus has increased since the first death was reported last week in Nigeria's coastal city of Lagos, home to 21 million people.

Togo-based Asky said it would no longer take on food in Guinea, where the outbreak was first identified. It said that passengers leaving the Guinean capital Conakry would be checked for signs of the disease before departure.

The airline added that medical teams would be deployed to screen passengers in transit through its Lome hub. The victim was a Liberian who traveled to Nigeria on Asky via Lome.

Nigeria's largest carrier, Arik Air, has suspended flights to Liberia and Sierra Leone because of the Ebola risk.

The fatality rate of the current outbreak is around 60 percent although the disease can kill up to 90 percent of those who catch it.

On Monday, a U.S. administration official said President Barack Obama was receiving updates and noted that U.S. agencies had stepped up assistance to help contain the virus. (Additional reporting by Emma Farge and Bate Felix in Dakar; Writing by David Lewis and Daniel Flynn; Editing by Kevin Liffey)


emr - 7/30/2014 at 12:52 AM

The area should be quarantined from travel until the outbreak is controlled; I'm sure our administration would deem that a racist action but damn - there is no way to treat this disease. Perhaps John Kerry can get his ass out of the Mid East and negotiate this one.


LeglizHemp - 7/30/2014 at 08:19 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/07/30/health/ebola-american-aid-workers/index.html? hpt=hp_t1

Peace Corps evacuates west Africa volunteers due to Ebola threat
By Jacque Wilson, CNN
updated 3:56 PM EDT, Wed July 30, 2014

(CNN) -- Humanitarian agencies working in west Africa on Wednesday stepped up their precautions against the Ebola virus, with the Peace Corps announcing it was removing hundreds of its volunteers from three of the hardest-hit nations.

The Peace Corps said 340 volunteers would temporarily leave Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, as local, national and international organizations tried to contain the disease.

"The agency has been and will continue to closely monitor the outbreak of the virus in collaboration with leading experts from the (U.S.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the U.S. Department of State," the Peace Corps said.

Two American aid workers working with Samaritan's Purse who were infected with the deadly Ebola virus "have shown a slight improvement in the past 24 hours," according to that international evangelical Christian humanitarian agency.

Both remain in serious condition, the agency said.

Dr. Kent Brantly, 33, who last lived in Fort Worth, Texas, and Nancy Writebol, who is from Charlotte, North Carolina, sought treatment for exposure to the virus last week. Both were caring for patients with Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia's capital.

"We ask that people continue to pray for Kent and Nancy and all those who are affected by Ebola, and the tremendous group of doctors and nurses who are caring for them," Samaritan's Purse said in a statement.

Doctors and other medical staff are particularly vulnerable to the Ebola virus because it spreads through exposure to bodily fluids from the infected. It can also spread through contact with an object that has been contaminated by an infected person's bodily fluids.

Brantly works with Samaritan's Purse. He has been the medical director for the Ebola Consolidated Case Management Center in Monrovia, where he has been providing care for Ebola patients since October. After testing positive for the virus, Brantly went into treatment at ELWA Hospital.

Samaritan's Purse has been working to evacuate him for better care, said Ken Isaacs, vice president of the agency. Unfortunately, emergency medical evacuation flights in the area are not equipped to handle the "intense isolation" required for an Ebola patient.

Brantly's family had been with him in Liberia, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but left for the United States before he became symptomatic; it is highly unlikely that his family members caught the virus from him, the CDC said. Out of an abundance of caution, they are on a 21-day fever watch, the CDC said.

"We have a strong family unit within a stronger faith community that has given us incredible support," the Brantly family said in a statement Tuesday. "Kent remains very physically weak, but his spirit has been determined throughout this ordeal."

Writebol works for Serving in Mission, or SIM. The missionary organization had teamed up with the staff from Samaritan's Purse to help fight the Ebola outbreak when she got sick.

It is believed one of the local staff was infected with Ebola and came to work with the virus on July 21 and 22, Isaacs told CNN.

"We think it was in the scrub-down area where the disease was passed to both Nancy and Kent," he said. That staff member died Thursday.

Because of the uptick in Ebola cases in the region, Todd Shearer, a spokesman for Samaritan's Purse, told CNN that the organization is evacuating nonessential staff out of Liberia. Serving in Mission also has recalled all nonessential personnel from Liberia, according to its website.

On Monday, the CDC issued an alert warning travelers to avoid hospitals with Ebola patients and funerals for those patients in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea due to the outbreak. The United States is considering raising the alert to discourage "nonessential" travel to those three countries, a U.S. government spokesman said.


BillyBlastoff - 7/30/2014 at 09:08 PM

quote:
The area should be quarantined from travel until the outbreak is controlled; I'm sure our administration would deem that a racist action but damn - there is no way to treat this disease. Perhaps John Kerry can get his ass out of the Mid East and negotiate this one.


What area are you talking about? All of Western Africa? I don't see it as being deemed racist. Just a huge infringement on several sovereign countries.

At least the outbreak is in Southwestern Africa. Traffic to and from Northern Africa from Europe is constant and heavy. When I was a migrant worker in France there were lots of folks from Africa, especially Tunisia looking for work.

I'm all for controlling the epidemic but I don't know how you can just cut off an area that size that encompasses so many countries from the rest of the world.

Would that be an act of war?


LeglizHemp - 7/30/2014 at 09:24 PM

pretty much all 3 countries have air travel shut down and borders closed as well as they can be closed. they have just done this in the last week because of the guy who flew to lagos and was on his way home to the USA. newspapers keep saying this guy was Liberian but he was a US citizen (just became citizen in the last year).

even with the 3-21 day incubation period it would still be difficult for this virus to spread significantly in the developed world. there is a very real possibility it can spread in the non-developed world though, especially africa.

edit

from the 1st post on june 23rd........There have been 567 cases and 350 deaths since the epidemic began in March

since then those numbers have doubled

[Edited on 7/30/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 7/30/2014 by LeglizHemp]


emr - 7/30/2014 at 10:24 PM

Economic war maybe; but immigrants at Ellis Island were quarantined. This is getting to be like that move ?Contagion? a few years ago.

I was an intern at St. Vincent's Hospital (R.I.P) in the West Village in 1981 at the start of the aids epidemic. We were scared out of our minds since no one knew how you got the disease. This is scarier than that in some ways as it seems it is spread through less intimate contact


BillyBlastoff - 7/30/2014 at 10:34 PM

I can relate to that early 80's AIDS fear. I was down in the Village to pay a ticket in the early 80's. There were non-stop reports on the AIDS epidemic. I had to make a phone call and found a pay phone. While I was making the call I looked around and began noticing all kinds of sickly emaciated people. I remember distinctly wondering if I could catch the disease from the pay phone. There was a real hysteria in NYC in those days.

I've wondered if more reporting on this ebola epidemic might make matters worst.


LeglizHemp - 7/31/2014 at 12:23 AM

http://www.vice.com/read/we-asked-an-expert-if-the-ebola-virus-will-kill-yo u-730

WE ASKED AN EXPERT IF THE EBOLA VIRUS WILL KILL YOU
By Matt Taylor Jul 30 2014

It's become a sort of annual ritual for Americans to go wild over the possibility that a new, lethal illness might spread from Africa or Southeast Asia to their own backyard. Ten years ago, SARS was coming for you, and more recently, the Avian (bird) flu had overzealous parents stocking up on post-apocalyptic goodies like powdered milk and canned foods.

The latest dire threat to humanity is actually an oldie: the Ebola Virus, which was first identified after a mysterious fever swept through Zaire (since rechristened the Democratic Republic of the Congo) in 1976. Richard Preston introduced the specter of Ebola to much of the western world with a 1992 New Yorker piece that he subsequently expanded into a best-selling non-fiction thriller, The Hot Zone. The book, in turn, inspired that goofy piece of 90s cinema, Outbreak—though I prefer Steven Soderbergh's 2011 film Contagion, which offers a somewhat less sensational take on the same theme.

Ebola sufferers will often bleed from their nose, eyes, and ears, in addition to a host of less bizarre symptoms like vomiting. The current outbreak is the largest in history, with about 700 people already dead in West African countries like Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone. Adding to the drama this week was the death of Sierra Leone's top Ebola doctor, along with news that an American traveling to Nigeria got sick and died there. The United Kingdom and Hong Kong are now quarantining passengers from the region, and with reports emerging of aid workers evacuating the West African coast, this is starting to look more and more like a global problem.

To find out just how likely Ebola is to reach our neck of the woods, I called up Dr. Diane Griffin, chair of Molecular Microbiology and Immunology at Johns Hopkins University's Bloomberg School of Public Health. She did her best to talk me down from the ledge.

VICE: What does the Ebola virus look like?
Dr. Diane Griffin: People get very rapidly ill with vomiting, diarrhea, bleeding—it's a hemorrhagic [bloody] fever. I'm not sure that if you lined up a whole bunch of people with different diseases that you could necessarily pick it out. Nobody has been able to figure out how the first person got infected.

What's the mortality rate?
The strain currently causing the outbreak in West Africa is Ebola Zaire, one of the original strains. They vary somewhat in how deadly they are, but this one has about a 70 percent mortality rate.

Is the number of deaths tied to the state of medicine and infrastructure in the country where the virus breaks out, or not really?
We don't know that because all these outbreaks are in Africa. One of the original outbreaks was in a missionary hospital that employed Belgian nuns, and the only way the whole Western world knew about it is that the nuns got evacuated to Belgium. But they still died at the same rate once they got there. It's a good example of the Western world not knowing or caring until their own get involved.

How does Ebola spread?
In contrast to a lot of other infections we worry about, it requires really close contact between the infected person and the uninfected person. The origin for the virus is in bats, and it gets into the human population kind of by accident. It spreads through hospitals—any place where patients are being taken care of. And more importantly, and more difficult to control, is in villages and families who are taking care of sick patients. It spreads within these families, and I gather—I'm not on the frontlines, though I have worked in Africa—I can envision a lot of the problems people encounter with suspicion. Medical workers and health care personnel [in West Africa] are scared and don't come to work. That makes it harder to keep up all these barrier precautions—it's inhibiting to have to be in a gown and mask and gloves and change them all the time.

What makes this outbreak different?
It's very widespread—usually they're quite localized—and they've had a hard time controlling it. The only way to contain the virus is through the isolation of patients and a barrier mechanism for preventing people who've had contact with infected individuals from being exposed to bodily fluids. It's not really unusual for American doctors working in these areas to get infected, though that tends to be what gets it into the press outside of Africa.

Which is sort of perverse.
Right. There's hundreds of cases and this has been going on for months, but all of a sudden in the last two days [people have noticed] because of two things: Americans have been infected, but also this person that flew to Nigeria, so all of a sudden everybody that has an airport is worried. It could move that way to any place just like any other infectious agent. I've heard rumors that they're starting to screen people leaving the area to make sure sick people don't get on airplanes. So that would be a reasonable precaution those countries can take to prevent it from spreading further. And then countries that have planes coming from that region can also screen passengers getting off to identify anybody with a fever or any other kind of illness and rapidly quarantine and then at least determine whether they're infected or not.

Do you think medical personnel would respond the same way to an Ebola outbreak here?
I think there would be much less of a problem in the United States or many other countries where medical personnel have a better understanding both of the precautions that need to be taken and how one gets infected. But the healthcare workers in many of these rural areas are not highly trained, and when they see co-workers and family members and neighbors dying, you can understand that would be a frightening situation.

What kind of precautions are reasonable for people outside of West Africa—and Americans in particular—to be taking? Should they modify their travel plans?
I don't think so, because the random tourist or businessperson or whoever is not going to come into contact with people who are sick—although there have been cases in the cities, which has been one of the problems. If you're going over there to help out in a hospital, then hopefully you know what you're getting into.

It sounds like you're reluctant to press the panic button. Is that your professional ethics talking, or what?
If I were panicked I'd let you know. I just don't think there's any reason for that. There are reasons to pay attention. One of the problems is that West Africa has not really experienced Ebola before, whereas Uganda and a few other countriues have had multiple outbreaks and they're a little more schooled in these control measures.


LeglizHemp - 7/31/2014 at 12:25 AM

i did read a story that said in past ebola outbreaks a man caught it from a cell phone....i swear...i read that


emr - 7/31/2014 at 01:18 AM

quote:
i did read a story that said in past ebola outbreaks a man caught it from a cell phone....i swear...i read that


http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/08/27/man-steals-ebola-patient-phone-get s-infected/

I guess crime does not pay


LeglizHemp - 8/4/2014 at 01:12 PM

http://www.newvision.co.ug/news/658359-doctor-who-treated-ebola-patient-has -contracted-virus-nigeria.html

Doctor who treated Ebola patient has contracted virus - NigeriaPublish Date: Aug 04, 2014

ABUJA - Nigerian authorities said Monday that a doctor in Lagos who treated a Liberian victim of Ebola has contracted the virus, the second confirmed case in sub-Saharan Africa's largest city.

"This new case is one of the doctors who attended to the Liberian Ebola patient who died," said Health Minister Onyebuchi Chukwu.

The minister told journalists that 70 other people believed to have come into contact with the Liberian are being monitored, eight of whom have been placed in quarantine at a facility in Lagos.

Patrick Sawyer, who worked for Liberia's finance ministry, contracted the virus from his sister before travelling to Lagos for a meeting of west African officials.

He landed in Lagos on July 20 from Monrovia after switching planes in Togo's capital Lome.

He was visibly sick upon arrival and taken directly to the First Consultants hospital in the upmarket Lagos neighbourhood of Ikoyi. He died in quarantine on July 25.

The hospital was closed indefinitely last week.

The second confirmed case in Nigeria is the latest in the deadliest-ever Ebola outbreak, which has infected 1,440 people and left 826 dead. The other cases are spread across Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.


LeglizHemp - 8/4/2014 at 02:14 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/04/health/experimental-ebola-serum/index.html?hp t=hp_t1

Secret serum likely saved Ebola patients
By Dr. Sanjay Gupta and Danielle Dellorto, CNN
updated 9:52 AM EDT, Mon August 4, 2014

(CNN) -- Three top secret, experimental vials stored at subzero temperatures were flown into Liberia last week in a last-ditch effort to save two American missionary workers who had contracted Ebola, according to a source familiar with details of the treatment.

On July 22, Dr. Kent Brantly woke up feeling feverish. Fearing the worst, Brantly immediately isolated himself. Nancy Writebol's symptoms started three days later. A rapid field blood test confirmed the infection in both of them after they had become ill with fever, vomiting and diarrhea.

It's believed both Brantly and Writebol, who worked with the aid organization Samaritan's Purse, contracted Ebola from another health care worker at their hospital in Liberia, although the official Centers for Disease Control and Prevention case investigation has yet to be released.

A representative from the National Institutes of Health contacted Samaritan's Purse in Liberia and offered the experimental treatment, known as ZMapp, for the two patients, according to the source.

The drug was developed by the biotech firm Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc. The patients were told that this treatment had never been tried before in a human being but had shown promise in small experiments with monkeys.

According to company documents, four monkeys infected with Ebola survived after being given the therapy within 24 hours after infection. Two of four additional monkeys that started therapy within 48 hours after infection also survived. One monkey that was not treated died within five days of exposure to the virus.

Brantly and Writebol were aware of the risk of taking a new, little understood treatment; informed consent was obtained from both Americans, according to two sources familiar with the care of the missionary workers. In the monkeys, the experimental serum had been given within 48 hours of infection. Brantly didn't receive it until he'd been sick for nine days.

The medicine is a three-mouse monoclonal antibody, meaning that mice were exposed to fragments of the Ebola virus and then the antibodies generated within the mice's blood were harvested to create the medicine. It works by preventing the virus from entering and infecting new cells.

The Ebola virus causes viral hemorrhagic fever, which refers to a group of viruses that affect multiple organ systems in the body and are often accompanied by bleeding.

Early symptoms include sudden onset of fever, weakness, muscle pain, headaches and a sore throat. They later progress to vomiting, diarrhea, impaired kidney and liver function -- and sometimes internal and external bleeding.

Vials reach hospital in Liberia

The ZMapp vials reached the hospital in Liberia where Brantly and Writebol were being treated Thursday morning. Doctors were instructed to allow the vials to thaw naturally without any additional heat. It was expected that it would be eight to 10 hours before the medicine could be given, according to a source familiar with the process.

Brantly asked that Writebol be given the first dose because he was younger and he thought he had a better chance of fighting it, and she agreed. However, as the first vial was still thawing, Brantley's condition took a sudden turn for the worse.

Brantly began to deteriorate and developed labored breathing. He told his doctors, "I am going to die," according to a source with firsthand knowledge of the situation.

Knowing his dose was still frozen, Brantly asked if he could have Writebol's now-thawed medication. It was brought to his room and administered through an IV. Within an hour of receiving the medication, Brantly's condition was nearly reversed. His breathing improved; the rash over his trunk faded away. One of his doctors described the events as "miraculous."

By the next morning, Brantly was able to take a shower on his own before getting on a specially designed Gulfstream air ambulance jet to be evacuated to the United States.

Writebol also received a vial of the medication. Her response was not as remarkable, according to sources familiar with the treatment. However, doctors on Sunday administered Writebol a second dose of the medication, which resulted in significant improvement.

She was stable enough to be evacuated back to the United States and is expected to arrive before noon Tuesday.

ZMapp has not been approved for human use, and has not even gone through the clinical trial process, which is standard to prove the safety and efficacy of a medication. The process by which the medication was made available to Brantly and Writebol is highly unusual. It may have fallen under the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "compassionate use" regulation, which allows access to investigational drugs outside clinical trials.

Getting approval for compassionate use is often long and laborious, but in the case of Brantly and Writebol, they received the medication within seven to 10 days of their exposure to the Ebola virus.

On July 30, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, an arm of the military responsible for any chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear and high-yield explosive threats, allotted additional funding to MAPP Biopharmaceutical due to "promising results."


LeglizHemp - 8/4/2014 at 09:16 PM

I have my doubts about this report. i think might be the press trying to sell papers.

http://time.com/3080189/ebola-mt-sinai-new-york/

Man Tested for Ebola at New York City Hospital
Alexandra Sifferlin @acsifferlin Charlotte Alter @charlottealter 4:20 PM ET

The patient had recently travelled to a West African country

A man who arrived at Mount Sinai hospital in New York City Monday with a high fever and stomach problems is being tested for Ebola, a hospital spokesman confirmed.

The patient had been visiting a West African country where Ebola cases have been reported. Africa is in the midst of the worst Ebola outbreak in history, with over 1,600 reported cases and over 887 deaths in Nigeria, Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone.

The hospital reports that the patient is being kept in isolation to prevent the spread of the deadly virus, and is being tested to confirm that his symptoms are from Ebola.

“All necessary steps are being taken to ensure the safety of all patients, visitors and staff,” Mt. Sinai said in a statement.

If the patient does indeed have Ebola, the hospital is equipped to handle the disease, which only spreads by direct contact with bodily fluids like blood and saliva. “Any advanced hospital in the U.S., any hospital with an intensive care unit has the capacity to isolate patients,” CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden told reporters late last week.

The CDC has long assured Americans that even if there were to be a patient with Ebola in the United States (besides the two Americans with Ebola evacuated from West Africa), the risk for the disease spreading is minimal. “We are confident that we will not have significant spread of Ebola, even if we were to have a patient with Ebola here,” Frieden said. “We work actively to educate American health care workers on how to isolate patients and how to protect themselves against infection.”

Unlike many health care workers in Western Africa, health care workers in U.S. hospitals have the resources to to keep themselves adequately protected while treating patients.


gina - 8/4/2014 at 11:21 PM

quote:
quote:
Life sure is good in the good ol' USA.


All it takes is one infected person to walk through a crowded airport.
Try reading "Executive Orders" by Tom Clancy


But it's okay Jerry, we're always prepared. We still have all those caskets that we did not use from the Swine flu pandemic they were not allowed to unleash. Well okay, they were allowed to unleash it but with all the noise the media made about who was profiting and owned stocks in the vaccine companies, they decided to hold off on that. Would have been much worse than Enron, all those politicians profiting off the vaccines while Americans were dieing and being piled up in plastic coffins six deep.

Here in good ole NY they had an emergency 'what if' response drill for anthrax last week. Must be expecting a run of cows crossing the border from Mexico and coming up here on freight trains deciding to run wild thru the streets of NY.


LeglizHemp - 8/5/2014 at 12:36 AM

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/08/05/health/patient-at-mount-sinai-has-ebola-l ike-symptoms-hospital-says.html

Symptoms of 3 New York Patients Raise Concerns About Ebola
By DENISE GRADY and MARC SANTORAAUG. 4, 2014

Heightened concern about the Ebola virus has led to alarms being raised at three hospitals in New York. But so far, no Ebola cases have turned up.

The latest episode involved a man who had recently been to West Africa, and who went to the emergency room at Mount Sinai Hospital in Manhattan late Sunday with a high fever and gastrointestinal problems, the hospital reported on Monday. He is being kept in isolation at the hospital while tests are being done for Ebola, a deadly disease, but also for other illnesses that could cause his symptoms.

But the city health department issued a statement on Monday saying that after consulting with Mount Sinai and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, “the health department has concluded that the patient is unlikely to have Ebola.

Specimens are being tested for common causes of illness and to definitively exclude Ebola. Testing results will be made available by C.D.C. as soon as they are available.”

At NYU Langone Medical Center last week, a patient who went to the emergency room with a fever and who mentioned a recent visit to West Africa was given a mask and moved to a secluded area, said Dr. Michael Phillips, the hospital’s director of Infection Prevention and Control. But further questioning revealed that the patient had not visited any of the affected countries, “so we stopped right there,” Dr. Phillips said.

At Bellevue Hospital Center last week, a patient was placed in isolation, but it quickly became clear that he did not have Ebola.

An Ebola outbreak centered mainly in three West African countries — Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia — has infected more than 1,300 people and killed more than 700 of them. American health officials have advised against nonessential travel to the three countries, and have urged doctors to be on high alert for people who return from the region with symptoms like fever, diarrhea and vomiting.

A Mount Sinai spokeswoman, Dorie Klissas, said that to protect the patient’s privacy the hospital was declining to make public his occupation, which country he had been in, whether he had been exposed to a patient with Ebola there, or whether he had close contacts like family members, friends or co-workers who were also at risk. Officials said they expected the results of the tests for Ebola within 24 to 48 hours.

In a statement to employees, hospital officials said that Ebola was spread only by direct contact with bodily fluids, and that infection control measures were being employed to protect patients and staff members.

In the Bellevue Hospital Center case, Dr. Ross Wilson, the chief medical officer at the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation, said that the man had symptoms also found in Ebola patients. He had arrived at Kennedy Airport from West Africa and was being detained by security personnel at the airport for an unrelated matter when he fell ill.

“He developed a headache and fever,” Dr. Wilson said. He was transported to Bellevue, but the people who brought him there did not suspect Ebola.

Continue reading the main story
“We immediately put the dots together,” Dr. Wilson said.

Following the guidance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, every patient entering one of the city’s 11 hospitals who has fever, headache and other symptoms associated with Ebola (as well as countless other ailments), is asked two new questions.

“Have you traveled to or from West African countries in the last 10 days? Have you been in contact with an Ebola patient or with anyone who has been in contact with an Ebola patient?”

When someone is suspected of having the infection, there are three key things that doctors rely on to make the diagnosis, Dr. Wilson said.

First, the history of travel and contacts is critical. Second is whether the symptoms match those of Ebola.

Finally, there are blood tests. There are only two facilities in the country that can perform these kinds of blood tests, including at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The blood tests are exceedingly complicated, he said, and there are different tests depending on the degree of sickness of the patient. Generally, he said, a 100 percent confirmation can take several days.


LeglizHemp - 8/7/2014 at 01:40 PM

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2014/08/06/ebola-nigeria-saudi-ara bia-virus-death-toll/13663973/


CDC issues highest-level alert for Ebola

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has issued its highest-level alert for a response to the Ebola crisis in West Africa.

"Ops Center moved to Level 1 response to given the extension to Nigeria & potential to affect many lives," CDC chief Tom Frieden said Wednesday on Twitter.

Level 1 means that increased staff and resources will be devoted to the outbreak, officials said. It is the first time the agency has invoked its highest level alert since 2009, over a flu outbreak.

Meantime, a Nigerian nurse who had treated the country's first fatality from Ebola two weeks ago has died from the virus that has now claimed more than 900 lives in the latest outbreak, Nigerian health officials said.

The World Health Organization, which convened a two-day emergency meeting of global health workers to discuss the crisis in Guinea, Liberia, Nigeria and Sierra Leone, said Wednesday that the death toll had jumped to 932, an increase of 45 fatalities in just four days.

Next week, the WHO will convene a panel of medical ethicists to explore the use of experimental treatment in the latest outbreak in West Africa.

In a statement on Wednesday, the WHO noted that the recent use of experimental drugs to treat two American medical missionaries has raised questions on whether drugs that have never been tested on humans should be used and, if so, who should receive it when there is only an extremely limited amount.

The two Americans, Kent Brantly and Nancy Writebol, have been repatriated from Liberia and are being treated for Ebola at the Emory University Hospital in Atlanta.

In New York, Mount Sinai Hospital said a patient placed in isolation since Monday does not have an Ebola infection, as feared. The patient is in stable condition and "improving," a statement from the hospital said.

In Nigeria, health officials said five other Nigerian health workers who also had treated American Patrick Sawyer have been diagnosed with the disease. Sawyer, a financial expert of Liberian descent who lives in Minnesota, died July 25 after arriving in Lagos on a flight from Liberia.

Meanwhile, a Saudi man being tested for the disease has died in Jeddah after returning from Sierra Leone on Sunday, according to Saudi health authorities.

If the Saudi death is found to be linked to the Ebola virus, it would be the first fatality outside the four West African countries during the latest outbreak, the Saudi Health Ministry says.

In Liberia late Wednesday, President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf declared a state of emergency because of the Ebola outbreak, saying some civil rights may have to be suspended as a result of the crisis. At least 282 people in Liberia have died from the disease.

In her televised speech, Sirleaf said that "ignorance and poverty, as well as entrenched religious and cultural practices, continue to exacerbate the spread of the disease."

Earlier, Nigerian health minister, Onyebuchi Chukwu, speaking to reporters in the capital, Abuja, confirmed the death of the Nigerian nurse on Tuesday and said the five newly diagnosed cases are being treated at an isolation ward in Lagos, The Guardian reports.

Lagos health officials also acknowledged that Sawyer was not initially isolated after becoming ill because authorities did not know immediately that he had contracted the Ebola virus.

There is no known cure for Ebola. Experts say people infected with the virus can spread the disease only through their bodily fluids and after they show symptoms. Since the incubation period can last up to three weeks, some of the Nigerians who treated Sawyer are only now showing signs of illness that can mimic many common tropical illnesses — fever, muscle aches and vomiting.

In April, Saudi Arabia said it would not issue visas this year to Muslim pilgrims from Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea during the hajj pilgrimage to Mecca.

Saudi Ambassador in Guinea Amjad Bedaiwi was quoted in the Saudi Arab News Wednesday as saying the decision affects a total of 7,400 pilgrims from those three countries.

Meanwhile, Spain was sending a specially equipped plane to Liberia to pick up a 75-year-old Spanish missionary priest, Miguel Pajares, and two nuns who have tested positive for the virus.

Q&A: The CDC on experimental Ebola drugs

The three had worked at St. Joseph's Catholic hospital, which was shut down following the death last week from Ebola of Patrick Nshamdze, the hospital's director. Three other hospital staff members have been diagnosed with the disease.

In Washington, President Obama pledged international support for the countries affected by the Ebola outbreak in remarks at the U.S.-Africa summit.

"The United States and our international partners will continue to do whatever we can to help our African partners respond to this crisis and stand with the people of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone," he said.


geordielad - 8/7/2014 at 07:31 PM

Every cloud has a silver lining tho' hey? Some "Christian" input.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/07/rick-wiles-ebola_n_5658481.html

Talk show host Rick Wiles took to his radio program this week to spout off about what he views as the great "attitude adjustment" America so desperately needs: the Ebola virus. In the eyes of Wiles, this pandemic could be an instrument of God used to destroy everyone that He deems immoral and unfit, such as queer people, atheists and those who've had an abortion. The right-wing pundit stated:

Now this Ebola epidemic can become a global pandemic and that’s another name for plague. It may be the great attitude adjustment that I believe is coming. Ebola could solve America’s problems with atheism, homosexuality, sexual promiscuity, pornography and abortion. If Ebola becomes a global plague, you better make sure the blood of Jesus is upon you, you better make sure you have been marked by the angels so that you are protected by God. If not, you may be a candidate to meet the Grim Reaper.


pops42 - 8/7/2014 at 07:45 PM

quote:
Every cloud has a silver lining tho' hey? Some "Christian" input.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/07/rick-wiles-ebola_n_5658481.html

Talk show host Rick Wiles took to his radio program this week to spout off about what he views as the great "attitude adjustment" America so desperately needs: the Ebola virus. In the eyes of Wiles, this pandemic could be an instrument of God used to destroy everyone that He deems immoral and unfit, such as queer people, atheists and those who've had an abortion. The right-wing pundit stated:

Now this Ebola epidemic can become a global pandemic and that’s another name for plague. It may be the great attitude adjustment that I believe is coming. Ebola could solve America’s problems with atheism, homosexuality, sexual promiscuity, pornography and abortion. If Ebola becomes a global plague, you better make sure the blood of Jesus is upon you, you better make sure you have been marked by the angels so that you are protected by God. If not, you may be a candidate to meet the Grim Reaper.
What a jackass!. I hope ebola takes mr. wiles and his like.

[Edited on 8/7/2014 by pops42]


LeglizHemp - 8/7/2014 at 10:46 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/07/health/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

Initial Ebola response called a 'failure'
By Jen Christensen and Jacque Wilson, CNN
updated 6:03 PM EDT, Thu August 7, 2014

(CNN) -- Missionaries from Samaritan's Purse had hoped they wouldn't have to become involved in the clinical care of Ebola patients in West Africa. But by June, they realized they had no choice, says Ken Isaacs, vice president of international programs and government relations for Samaritan's Purse.

The deadly Ebola virus had spread from Guinea to Liberia and Sierra Leone. At the time, nearly 400 cases and more than 200 deaths had been reported.

Now there are more than 1,711 suspected and confirmed Ebola cases in the region, including 932 deaths, according to the World Health Organization, and the epidemic has spread to Nigeria.

Samaritan's Purse believes these numbers represent fewer than half of the real number of cases, Isaacs said Thursday at an emergency congressional hearing on the Ebola outbreak.

"The Ebola crisis we are now facing is not a surprise to us at Samaritan's Purse, but it took two Americans getting the disease in order for the international community and the United States to take serious notice of the largest outbreak of the disease in history," Isaacs said.

He characterized the initial international response to the Ebola outbreak as a "failure" because the virus spread outside the country where the outbreak originated. He said that a broader coordinated intervention is the only thing that will slow the size and speed of this disease.

"The ministries of health in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone do not have the capacity to handle these crises in their countries," Isaacs said. If the international community does not get involved, "the world will be relegating the containment of this disease that threatens Africa and other countries to three of the poorest nations in the world."

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden agrees that the number of people who have been infected with Ebola is likely undercounted. That's in large part, he said at the hearing, because there are a limited number of lab facilities there to confirm the cases accurately.

That's why developing a better lab system is so important, he said. The CDC is working with international partners, the U.S. Defense Department and the National Institutes of Health to bulk up the lab infrastructure in West Africa and to develop a better way to transport blood samples to those labs.

What's most important, Frieden said, is that people understand that there is a clear way to stop this outbreak -- and that's at the source in Africa. This, he said, is the only way to get it under control.

"It's laborious. It's hard. It requires local knowledge and local action."

Stopping the epidemic will be particularly challenging since the local health system is so weak, he said. While the CDC will send at least 50 staff in the next week or two, the health system has to be beefed up to stop and prevent future outbreaks.

Frieden said that someone once told him the CDC is the world's 911 system. While he appreciated the compliment, he wants to make sure that every country or region has its own 911.

Dr. Ariel Pablos-Méndez, the assistant administrator for the U.S. Agency for International Development's Bureau for Global Health, said that USAID is providing funding to help with the response to this outbreak.

They are coordinating a response with local health workers and have provided 35,000 sets of protective equipment, supplies, soap and water. Many health care workers are still laboring in the region without protective gear, which is why these workers make up a large portion of Ebola cases.

There was a sense of optimism at the hearing.

"We are confident we can contain and stop the virus," said Bisa Williams, the State Department's deputy assistant secretary for the Bureau of African Affairs.

The State Department is working closely with the governments of all the countries impacted by the outbreak. They are trying to help health care providers gain access to affected areas. They are also giving technical and financial assistance to treatment centers.

Williams said an international response will be essential.


LeglizHemp - 8/8/2014 at 12:47 PM

I heard this morning that DuPont is ramping up production of these suits. I have not found confirmation of this yet though. I am curious as to how much they are increasing production.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/08/05/ebola-protection-suits_n_5651154.h tml

This Is What Doctors Wear To Protect Themselves Against Ebola In West Africa
The Huffington Post | By Amanda L. Chan
Posted: 08/05/2014 11:50 am EDT Updated: 08/05/2014 11:59 am EDT

When a contagious virus has a high fatality rate, you must take measures to protect yourself from contracting it -- especially if it's your job to come into contact with patients who have it.

Enter the Personal Protection Equipment worn by doctors in West Africa, who are on the front lines of the worst Ebola virus outbreak in history. At this point, you've likely seen images of doctors wearing the gear, which involves a layer of scrubs, rubber boots, an impermeable Tyvek suit and hood, a respirator and googles. TIME put together a video explaining each element of the Personal Protection Equipment suit, which you can watch above.

Because the Ebola virus can only be transmitted through contact with bodily fluids, the suits are meant to protect the wearer from directly touching any contaminated fluids. Infection control, through sterilization of equipment and surfaces, is also extremely important, since the virus can also be contracted through contact with contaminated surfaces.


gina - 8/9/2014 at 05:55 PM

quote:
quote:
Life sure is good in the good ol' USA.


All it takes is one infected person to walk through a crowded airport.
Try reading "Executive Orders" by Tom Clancy


And infect the scanning machines, who is liable for mass infecting of people then? it is a valid question. But something else needs to be done, we should close our borders to people travelling FROM the infected countries. Do not let anyone in from those countries. Anyone wanting to travel to those countries, fine, they can leave here, but they cannot come back till the disease is contained OVER THERE. Why hasn't anyone suggested that? (can't limit the rights of Africans to travel here and infect people?)

[Edited on 8/9/2014 by gina]


LeglizHemp - 8/24/2014 at 04:18 PM

next week will be 30 days more and i'm pretty sure the infected and death toll has doubled again

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/24/world/africa/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp _t2

First WHO worker stricken with Ebola
By Joyce Joseph, Nana Karikari-apau, and Leslie Holland, CNN
updated 11:30 AM EDT, Sun August 24, 2014

(CNN) -- For the first time, a worker with the World Health Organization has fallen ill from Ebola, the WHO told CNN on Sunday.
The health worker, a man from Senegal, is in Sierra Leone and receiving care, the WHO said. No further details were given immediately.
When asked how the worker contracted the virus, a WHO spokesperson said officials don't yet know all the details.
Separately, a British citizen infected with the virus in Sierra Leone is being flown home, the British Department of Health announced Sunday.
The man, simply identified as William, lives in the West African nation in a home established by an American university for researchers.
He is a volunteer nurse in Kenema Government Hospital, where he was working with Ebola patients, according to Dr. Robert Garry of Tulane University.
Garry is manager of the university's program that researches Ebola. The hospital is run by the government of Sierra Leone, but receives support from Tulane researchers.

The UK government said a specially equipped C17 Royal Air Force plane would transport the patient, who would be transferred to an isolation unit at the Royal Free London NHS Foundation Trust.
"UK hospitals have a proven record of dealing with imported infectious diseases and this patient will be isolated and will receive the best care possible," said deputy chief medical officer John Watson in a press release.
Meanwhile, Ivory Coast announced Saturday that it's closing its borders in response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa.
Prime Minister Daniel Duncan signed the order that closes the land borders Ivory Coast shares with Guinea and Liberia.
The borders will remain closed until further notice in an effort to prevent the Ebola virus from spreading into its territory, according to the government statement.
Ebola is one of the world's most virulent diseases, according to the WHO.
The virus is introduced to human populations through the human handling of infected animals -- like fruit bats, gorillas and monkeys, to name a few -- found sick or dying in the rainforest.
The infection is then transmitted among humans through direct contact with the blood or other bodily fluids of infected people.
WHO's maps of confirmed cases show the Ebola outbreak is limited to four West African nations -- Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria. So far, nearly 2,500 suspected cases have been reported in what the WHO says is the worst known outbreak of the disease.
However, the WHO's website says the survival rate for people with Ebola in this outbreak has been 47%, which is a substantial improvement over the disease's survival rate, historically.
CNN's Aliza Kassim and Carma Hassan contributed to this report.


LeglizHemp - 8/27/2014 at 08:20 PM

Ok the numbers have doubled again as of today I think. we went from 350 dead to 700 dead to now over 1500 dead. will it double again in 30 days? a new strain possibly in the congo with 13 dead 24 infected. i think that one will be under control soon.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/27/health/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

Ebola outbreak: 'It's even worse than I'd feared'
By Jacque Wilson, CNN
updated 3:25 PM EDT, Wed August 27, 2014

(CNN) -- "It's even worse than I'd feared," Dr. Tom Frieden, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, said Wednesday of the Ebola outbreak rampaging through West Africa. "Every day this outbreak goes on, it increases the risk for another export to another country.

"The sooner the world comes together to help Liberia and West Africans, the safer we will all be."

Frieden spoke to CNN's Nima Elbagir in Monrovia, Liberia, where fear and anger over the largest Ebola outbreak on record has grown as health officials put up quarantines around some of the capital city's poorest areas.

More than 2,600 people have been infected by Ebola in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria since the outbreak began in December, according to the World Health Organization. Nearly 1,500 have died.

Health care workers at risk

A CDC staff member was recently flown home to the United States on a private charter after spending time in close proximity with another health care worker who tested positive for Ebola in Sierra Leone.

The CDC worker is reportedly healthy and has shown no symptoms of the deadly virus. He or she is simply rotating back to the United States as previously scheduled, according to the CDC. It is CDC policy that people who have been exposed to Ebola and are traveling long distances do so on a private plane in the three weeks after exposure to lower the risk of spreading the infection.

"We think it's the right thing to do, to bring them home," CDC spokesman Tom Skinner said. "They want to come home. Their tour of duty was up, and we've made it crystal clear that if they go over there and have something like this happen and want to go home, we're going to bring them home."

The staff member will be monitored for 21 days -- the longest known incubation period -- for Ebola symptoms, but he or she currently "poses no Ebola-related risk to friends, family, co-workers, or the public," the CDC said in a statement.

The other health care worker, who tested positive for Ebola, has been flown to Germany to recover, Skinner said.

The World Health Organization said Monday that 120 health care workers have died in the Ebola outbreak, and twice that number have been infected.

Public health experts say several factors are to blame, including a shortage of protective gear and improper use of the gear they do have.

The fact that the disease has killed so many people working to care for infected patients is making it increasingly hard to combat the virus in West Africa, WHO said.

"It depletes one of the most vital assets during the control of any outbreak. WHO estimates that in the three hardest-hit countries, only one to two doctors are available to treat 100,000 people, and these doctors are heavily concentrated in urban areas."

Another outbreak

On Tuesday, the Ministry of Health for the Democratic Republic of Congo notified WHO of another possible Ebola outbreak.

Health officials say a woman in the Central African country became ill with symptoms of Ebola after butchering a bush animal that had been given to her by her husband. She died on August 11. Since then health care workers, relatives and other individuals who came in contact with her body have developed symptoms and died.

Between July 28 and August 18, a total of 24 suspected cases of an unidentified hemorrhagic fever, including 13 deaths, have been identified, WHO said.

Samples have been sent to laboratories to confirm that these illnesses are being caused by the Ebola virus and to identify the strain. As none of the people involved has been to the four countries affected by the other Ebola epidemic, health officials believe this to be a separate outbreak.

The Democratic Republic of Congo has seen six smaller Ebola outbreaks since the 1970s, according to the CDC.


[Edited on 8/27/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 8/27/2014 by LeglizHemp]


LeglizHemp - 9/2/2014 at 01:55 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/02/health/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

CDC director raises Ebola alarm
By Mariano Castillo, CNN
updated 9:24 AM EDT, Tue September 2, 2014

(CNN) -- The Ebola outbreak in West Africa is much worse than official figures show, and other countries are unintentionally making it harder to control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Dr. Tom Frieden told CNN on Tuesday.

"We've seen outbreaks of Ebola before. This is the first epidemic spreading widely through many countries, and it is spiraling out of control," said Frieden, who recently returned from a trip to the region. "It's bad now, much worse than the numbers show. It's going to get even worse in the very near future."

More than 2,600 people have been infected by Ebola in Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone and Nigeria since the outbreak began in December, according to the World Health Organization. More than 1,500 have died.

Other countries are turning their backs on those coming from countries where the outbreak is strongest, even if they don't realize it, he said.

Measures to restrict flights and border crossings into the countries facing the outbreak were designed to contain the spread, but are having a paradoxical effect, Frieden said.

"This is making it really hard to get help in and to respond effectively to the outbreak," he said on CNN's "New Day."

"What we're seeing is a spiraling of cases, a hugely fast increase in cases, that's harder and harder to manage," he said. "The more we can get in there and tamp that down, the fewer cases we'll have in the weeks and months to come."

Frieden sounded the same alarm last week during a visit to Liberia.

The sooner the world unites to help West Africa, the safer the world will be, he said.

Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said Monday that the massive Ebola outbreak in her country "remains grave."

"Our health delivery system is under stress. The international community couldn't respond quickly," she told CNN.

But she also sounded hopeful. She said that conditions are slowly improving and that the world is responding to the epidemic, realizing the catastrophe that could unfold if the virus were to spread beyond Africa's borders.

The West African nation of Senegal confirmed its first Ebola case last week, one week after closing its border with Guinea.

Senegal is the fifth country in the region to report the Ebola virus.


LeglizHemp - 9/3/2014 at 01:35 PM

http://www.forbes.com/sites/scottgottlieb/2014/09/03/can-ebola-go-airborne/

Can Ebola Go Airborne?

A study in the journal Science, released last week, shows that the Ebola strain spreading across Western Africa has undergone a surprisingly high amount of genetic drift during the current outbreak. Experts say the mutations could eventually make the virus harder to diagnose and perhaps treat with a new therapeutic. But can mutations also enable Ebola to spread through the air.

In yesterday’s Wall Street Journal, I write that in response to the crisis, the Obama administration has stressed that the disease is unlikely to spread inside America. We will certainly see cases diagnosed here, and perhaps even experience some isolated clusters of disease. For now, though, the administration’s assurances are generally correct: Health-care workers in advanced Western nations maintain infection controls that can curtail the spread of non-airborne diseases like Ebola.

But our relative comfort in the U.S., based on our belief that our advanced public health tools could easily contain a virus spread only through direct contact, would change radically if Ebola were to alter its mode of spread. We know the virus is mutating. Could in adapt in a way that makes it airborne?

It’s highly unlikely. It would be improbable for a virus to transform in a way that changes its mode of infection. Of the 23 known viruses that cause serious disease in man, none are known to have mutated in ways that changed how they infect humans. Of course, we only know about a small portion of the existing viruses.

A little background is in order.




The ability of Ebola to spread without direct contact with an infected individual, and whether or not it is efficiently spread through air, are different issues.

It’s already possible that Ebola can spread, in rare cases, through direct contact with respiratory secretions. This might occur, for example, when an infected person coughs or sneezes directly on another, uninfected individual. The Centers for Disease Control specifically recommends “droplet protection” be taken in the hospital setting when healthcare workers are treating patients infected with Ebola. This kind of direct spread is sometimes referred to as “droplet contact,” but it’s distinct from airborne spread.

When a viral infection becomes “airborne,” like ordinary influenza, it means that discharged microbes remain suspended in the air for long periods of time. Generally speaking, this is what is meant by “airborne transmission.” In this case, the organisms must be capable of surviving for long periods of time outside the body and must be resistant to drying. Airborne transmission allows organisms to enter the upper and lower respiratory tracts. This sort of transmission is sometimes also referred to as “droplet contact” or “viral droplet nuclei transmission.”

For this article, I am focused on the latter circumstance — whether or not Ebola could mutate in a way that makes it highly contagious through the air, by allowing the individual viral particles to survive for long periods suspended in dry air.

Right now, Ebola is spread through direct contact with the body fluids of actively infected individuals. Indirect transmission is also possible by means of contact with an object (fomite) that has been soiled by the body fluids of an infected individual.




The widespread belief is that the Ebola virus would be very unlikely to change in a way that would allow the individual virus particles to be concentrated, and remain suspended in respiratory secretions — and then infect contacts through inhalation.

The Ebola virus is comprised of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Such a structure makes it prone to undergoing rapid genetic changes. But to become airborne, a lot of unlikely events would need to occur. Ebola’s RNA genome would have to mutate to the point where the coating that surrounds the virus particles (the protein capsid) is no longer susceptible to harsh drying effects of being suspended in air.

To be spread through the air, it also generally helps if the virus is concentrated in the lungs of affected patients. For humans, this is not the case. Ebola generally isn’t an infection of the lungs. The main organ that the virus targets is the liver. That is why patients stricken with Ebola develop very high amounts of the virus in the blood and in the feces, and not in their respiratory secretions.

Could Ebola mutate in a way that confers these qualities on the virus?

Anything is possible. But such a scientific feat would rate as highly unlikely. A lot of the speculation that Ebola could be airborne stems from a set of earlier studies that showed Ebola virus may have been able to spread through the air between infected pigs and monkeys. There are reasons why these studies are not applicable when it comes to questions around human-to-human transmission. In animals, Ebola behaves differently than it does in people, for example concentrating in lung tissue.

Nonetheless, the fact that the Ebola virus is undergoing rapid changes reinforces the urgency of getting this epidemic under control. We need to snuff it out. While the virus is unlikely to be modified in a way that changes its mode of infection, the resulting mutations could nonetheless make it harder to diagnose, or even treat.

Moreover, our ability to prevent an epidemic here in the U.S. doesn’t relinquish our obligations abroad. Even if the epidemic remains confined to Western Africa, the outbreak could rank as one the cruelest natural catastrophes of recent times—if not in human death and suffering, then certainly in the economic and social devastation caused by declining commerce, and the strife resulting from mass cordons. As I note in the Wall Street Journal, “compared with a one-time act of nature, like a storm, that delivers its destruction at once; the swelling nature of a viral epidemic can magnify its impact on economic and civil life.”

For all of these reasons, and most of all for the humanitarian imperative; we need to be very concerned about the epidemic unfolding in Western Africa, even if the U.S. isn’t at direct risk of an outbreak now. We need a vigorous plan for helping that region deal with this evolving catastrophe.


LeglizHemp - 9/5/2014 at 02:04 AM

booooooo scary

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/a-2006-mathematical-model-shows-how-ebola- could-wipe-us-out

This Mathematical Model from 2006 Shows How Ebola Could Wipe Us Out

Written by
JORDAN PEARSON
September 4, 2014 // 03:50 PM EST

The current Ebola outbreak in West Africa is the worst in history, and the death toll just surpassed 1,900. Previous WHO estimates indicated that the outbreak would end mid-fall, but the situation is quickly spiraling out of control and into a sea of unknowns.

The “Ebola epidemic is the largest, and most severe, and most complex we have ever seen in the nearly 40-year history of this disease,” World Health Organization director general Margaret Chan said in a special briefing yesterday. “No one, even outbreak responders, [has] ever seen anything like it.”

Yaneer Bar-Yam, the complex systems analyst whose model accurately predicted the global unrest that led to the Arab Spring, is also worried about the patterns he sees in the disease's advance. Models he designed for the New England Complex Systems Institute back in 2006 show that Ebola could rapidly spread, and, in a worse case scenario, even cause an extinction event, if enough infected people make it through an international airport.

“What happened was that we were modelling the dynamics of the evolution of diseases—of pathogens—and we showed that if you just add a very small amount of long-range transportation, the diseases escape their local context and eventually drive everything to extinction,” Bar-Yam told Motherboard. “They drive their hosts to extinction.”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNaQUlIa5_E

Bar-Yam says he has informed the WHO and the CDC of his findings, but they haven’t listened, he said.

“I just gave a lecture to the World Health Organization in January and I told them. I said, there’s this transition to extinction and we don’t know when it’s going to happen,” Bar-Yam explained. “But I don’t think that there has been a sufficient response.”

Normally, the spread of a predator—and this is as true for Ebola as it is for invasive animal species—is stymied when it overexploits its prey, effectively drying up its own food source. In rural areas like those where the current Ebola outbreak is centered, diseases tend to contain themselves by wiping out all available hosts in a concentrated area.



If a particularly aggressive predator happens to make it out of its local context, say, on an international flight, Bar-Yam’s models show that it can avoid local extinction through long-range dispersal. At this point, the linear model of the disease's outbreak makes a statistical transition into an entirely different dynamic; extinction for all of its hosts across vast geographic distances, and only afterwards for the disease.

The argument has been made that an Ebola outbreak would not be as severe in the West as it is in Africa, because the poor healthcare infrastructure where the disease has struck is the chief vector of its spread. Bar-Yam sees this assumption as a vast overestimation of our handle on the dynamics of disease containment.

“The behavior of an individual in a major metropolitan area in terms of engaging with the health care system depends on a lot of different factors,” Bar-Yam explained. “A reasonable person might be have in one way, but another person will behave in another. We don’t know what happens if someone with Ebola throws up in a subway before that gets cleaned up and people understand that happened because of Ebola.”

Panic is never a wise thing to incite, because it can result in exactly the kinds of unpredictable behavior that Bar-Yam is warning us about. However, a healthy amount of fear is a different matter.

“The question becomes, at what point do we hit the panic button? What does it look like to hit the panic button?” he said.

Bar-Yam’s suggested approach to containing the outbreak is radical, he admits, and flies in the face of the WHO’s nonplussed reaction to Korean Airlines, which stopped running flights into Kenya last week. According to the WHO, halting flights to West Africa makes it difficult for healthcare experts to make it into the region to help. Bar-Yam agrees, but maintains that the danger of the disease coming back with them is too great a risk.

“They’re saying they need a large number of healthcare professionals to go there and deal with this. But that doesn’t mean that people have to leave there,” he said. “One sets up a one-way transportation system where people can go there to deal with the disease.”

It’s a prescription that is likely to bristle healthcare experts who'd to help Africans suffering from Ebola without necessarily signing their own death certificate. However, Bar-Yam said, the possibility of Ebola making it into a metropolitan area is far more grim than any potential containment efforts.

While the outbreak response thus far has been more or less handled on an individual basis, treating cases as they pop up while simultaneously studying the infection, a containment attempt to limit movement in and around the diseased area is a systemic response, and that’s exactly what’s needed.

“If the disease comes to an urban area in the United States, the targeted response of addressing individuals who have the infection is not the same as a systemic response that addresses the ability of the disease to spread,” Bar-Yam said. “We need to have the knowledge and understanding of how to do a systemic response.”


BrerRabbit - 9/5/2014 at 04:04 PM

From the CDC website:

If you must travel to an area with known Ebola cases, make sure to do the following:

•Practice careful hygiene. Avoid contact with blood and body fluids.
•Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.
•Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.
•Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat prepared from these animals.
•Avoid hospitals where Ebola patients are being treated. The U.S. embassy or consulate is often able to provide advice on facilities.
•After you return, monitor your health for 21 days and seek medical care immediately if you develop symptoms of Ebola.

Looks like if it is going to be an extinction event, it will be the extinction of the segment of the population that is ignorant of simple hygiene practices. I'm good with that. Just wash your hands and handle public door handles with care until its over, and you will inherit the planet.

[Edited on 9/5/2014 by BrerRabbit]


gina - 9/6/2014 at 06:54 PM

Problem is like with other pathogens, the virus lives after the people who left their germs are no longer in the vicinity. I remember a tuberculosis epidemic in upper Manhattan in the late 1980's, you could ride on a subway and the droplets containing the bacteria were still there after another passenger left. You come in and breathe them, get infected and never saw anyone cough near you. Pneumonia, flu, same thing.

Even the food chain, America has migrant workers who do not have sanitized working conditions, they relieve themselves in the fields, the bacteria gets onto the food. The animals we eat are fed corn, GMO corn to fatten them up, the grass they eat has acid rain on it, it just goes on and on, the contamination.


LeglizHemp - 9/23/2014 at 12:32 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/23/world/africa/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp _t2

Ebola has claimed 2,800 lives in 6 months, WHO study finds
By Laura Smith-Spark, CNN
updated 6:28 AM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014

(CNN) -- The death toll from Ebola in West Africa has now climbed to more than 2,800, with 5,800 cases confirmed as of Monday, the World Health Organization said.

In the six months since this outbreak was first formally reported, 337 health care workers have been infected, of whom more than 181 have died, the WHO said.

Its six-month situation report -- which assesses the situation in the three countries at the center of the outbreak, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone -- is dedicated to those health workers "who, as an expression of our innately shared human compassion, risked their lives, and lost them."

It also looks at the likelihood of the virus spreading into other countries.

In what may be seen as an encouraging sign, the WHO indicates that "countries with well-developed health systems and services are unlikely to see much -- if any -- onward transmission of Ebola virus disease following an imported case."


LeglizHemp - 9/23/2014 at 08:23 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/23/world/africa/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp _t2

watch the video......very compelling

CDC: Ebola cases could reach at least 550,000 by January

By Laura Smith-Spark, Miriam Falco, and Jen Christensen CNN
updated 3:31 PM EDT, Tue September 23, 2014

(CNN) -- The number of Ebola cases in Liberia and Sierra Leone could rise to between 550,000 and 1.4 million by January if there are no "additional interventions or changes in community behavior," the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report Tuesday. The estimate was derived from a new forecasting tool developed by the CDC.

The range of estimated cases -- from 550,000 to 1.4 million -- is wide because experts suspect the current count is highly under-reported. The official death toll from Ebola in West Africa has climbed to more than 2,800 in six months, with 5,800 cases confirmed as of Monday, the World Health Organization said.

But the CDC estimates that if 70% of people with Ebola are properly cared for in medical facilities, the epidemic could decrease and eventually end.

In a press conference Tuesday, CDC Director Tom Frieden cautioned that this model is based on older data from August. The numbers are not projections, but "scenarios." The model does not take into account President Obama's announcement that the U.S. is sending troops and extra medical equipment to the area. Nor does it take into account the additional help from other countries promised.

What the model does suggests, he said, is that the current surge of help can "break the back of the epidemic" and is "exactly what's needed" to end it. He said he is now "confident the most dire predictions will not come to pass."

The cautionary tale this data does tell, he said is that there would be an "enormous cost" if help is delayed.
Gayle Smith, a special assistant to the President and senior director of the National Security Council said the model tells responders how to "bend the curve" and that the epidemic can end with a large international response. "The momentum must at least be maintained to ensure we are way out ahead of this," Smith said. And added that the international help will need to "stay on this as long as it takes."

A separate nine-month assessment published by WHO experts in The New England Journal of Medicine on Tuesday says the fatality rate of this outbreak in West Africa is 71% and that the "current epidemiologic outlook is bleak."

It also warns that without "drastic improvements" in measures to control its spread, the number of cases and deaths from Ebola is expected to continue climbing from hundreds to thousands per week in the coming months. The cumulative number of cases could exceed 20,000 by November 2, the assessment said.

It blamed the spread not on a particularly virulent strain of the virus, rather it said this outbreak was so deadly because of a "combination of dysfunctional health systems, international indifference, high population mobility, local customs, densely populated capitals, and lack of trust in authorities after years of armed conflict."

"Perhaps most important, Ebola has reached the point where it could establish itself as an endemic infection because of a highly inadequate and late global response."

It warns that the global response must improve to meet the threat posed by this and future epidemics.
Another six-month report from WHO -- which assesses the situation in three countries at the outbreak's center, Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone -- is dedicated to those health workers "who, as an expression of our innately shared human compassion, risked their lives, and lost them."

In the six months since this outbreak was first formally reported in March, 337 health care workers have been infected, of whom more than 181 have died, the WHO said.

The WHO's six-month report on Guinea, where the outbreak began in a remote area, details how the virus first gained a grip on a vulnerable, frightened population ill-equipped to deal with the deadly disease.
Once Ebola was identified as the killer, a national and international response swung into gear. But each time it looked like the country might be at the point of controlling the virus, new flare-ups occurred.

The WHO report concludes Ebola kept getting reintroduced "into Guinea -- with its notoriously porous borders -- from the large outbreaks in neighboring Liberia and Sierra Leone."

Controlling the virus then will not be feasible in Guinea until its stopped in neighboring countries.
Meanwhile, health workers there have come under attack as they seek to educate the local population.
"Today, one of the biggest barriers to control is violence from an impoverished, terrified and shattered population that does not understand what hit it and fights back the only way it can," the report said.

Liberia: Misery and hope

WHO's six-month report on Liberia summarizes their situation as one of "misery and despair tempered by some good reasons for hope."

The number of Liberian cases is increasing exponentially, with 113 new ones reported over a single 24-hour period on one day last week, WHO said -- a record number in any outbreak. At the same time, treatment centers are overflowing. Many patients are turned away.

Read: Desperation grows in the Ebola zone

The capacity to deliver other basic health services, such as care for women in childbirth, has been compromised. The report warns malaria-related deaths may soon surpass those from Ebola.

Hope can be found in the opening of a new WHO-funded, 120-bed Ebola treatment center, it said. The U.S. government is also setting up a new laboratory to speed up diagnosis. Currently there are four major Ebola treatment units in Liberia.

In remarks made on Tuesday, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said that her country's health care system is hurting. Of the over 1500 who have died, 85 were health care workers.

The President characterized the CDC's model for possible infections as "scary to all of us." She added, though, that she is happy with the U.S. response to the disaster. She believes it will make a "major" difference.

She predicts with that increased international effort, Liberia will see better results in a couple of weeks.

Sierra Leone: Urgent needs

The situation assessment for Sierra Leone explains how traditional burial practices helped the virus spread quickly there following the funeral of a respected local healer.

The virus has taken a devastating toll on health workers and researchers.

"Sierra Leone's most urgent needs include more treatment beds in much safer facilities, better contact training and follow-up, more personal protective equipment and body bags, and more properly protected teams to collect bodies and bury them safely," WHO said.

The deployment of international medical teams in West Africa, including from China and Cuba, may help.
Nigeria and Senegal, where the situation is judged "stable -- for the moment," are seen as success stories.
Those countries have shown conventional methods such as early detection, contact tracing, isolation and an adequate supply of personal protective equipment can contain the virus, WHO said.

"If Nigeria can control an outbreak caused by such a deadly and highly contagious virus, right from the start, any country in the world can do the same," its report said.


gina - 9/28/2014 at 03:50 PM

CDC has the patents to the vaccine that can cure it. They had a cure since 2003. Logistically, nobody can get into all those villages to deliver vaccines, they could do air drops of medicine etc. but those people have been written off. It is too expensive to make the vaccines, distribute to people that the power elite deem as just taking up space and using resources. That is the reality.

RIght now they have been giving polio vaccines to children in Mumbai and Pakistan, and their children are ending up paralyzed so they don't want the vaccines anymore.

And you remember the Swine flu epidemic, the squalene and thimersol as ingredients and Washington's administration holding stock in the companies that made it.

Ebola will kill many people in third world countries. Here with the influx of people from Mexico, Central America, the Caribbean islands and South America it will get a foothold here as well. We can give them vaccines paid for by Medicaid, but how long do we support the welfare state of people living here who want medical care when more than 20 million Americans have no health care and cannot afford Obamacare.

Ebola will have infected 1.4 million in LIberia and Sierra Leone by the end of January 2015.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bpeIz_J1g4s&list=UUFGmA4owCCCb-rn0DrkDy pA

The US has held patents since 2003 on the vaccines to cure Ebola.

http://www.google.com/patents/US7736656

http://www.google.com/patents/US20120...
Patented in 2003


LeglizHemp - 9/28/2014 at 04:24 PM

so far the death toll has been doubling every month so i think 550,000 to 1 million is a big over estimation. 35-45 thousand is more realistic by january. even 100,000 i suppose would be possible if things spread to some other countries soon.


Bill_Graham - 9/28/2014 at 04:39 PM

I think the West is a little over confident that this illness can be contained in Africa and will not spread to their countries. All it takes a few ill patients to get into the U.S. undetected for this thing to get a foothold. Just imagine if it was airborne.


LeglizHemp - 9/30/2014 at 09:52 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/09/30/health/ebola-us/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

CDC: First diagnosed case of Ebola in the U.S.
By Greg Botelho, CNN
updated 5:41 PM EDT, Tue September 30, 2014

(CNN) -- A patient being treated at a Dallas, Texas, hospital is the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced Tuesday.
Several other Americans were diagnosed in West Africa and then brought to the United States for treatment.
The person who first tested positive for Ebola in the United States is a patient at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas, hospital spokesman Stephen O'Brien said Tuesday.
The adult patient developed symptoms days after returning to Texas from West Africa, and was admitted into isolation on Sunday, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.


LeglizHemp - 10/2/2014 at 01:05 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/02/health/ebola-us/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

U.S. Ebola case: 80 monitored in Dallas
By Holly Yan and Gary Tuchman, CNN
updated 8:49 AM EDT, Thu October 2, 2014

Dallas (CNN) -- [Breaking news update, posted at 8:49 a.m. ET]

Health officials are monitoring not only the people the Dallas Ebola patient had contact with while he was contagious and not isolated, but also dozens of people that they subsequently contacted, Dallas County Health and Human Services spokeswoman Erikka Neroes said Thursday.

Eighty people -- the patient's contacts, plus people with whom they had contact -- are now being monitored for Ebola in the Dallas area, Neroes said. Earlier, Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings said the patient's direct contacts numbered up to 20.

None has shown symptoms, and all are being given educational materials, Neroes said.

None of the 80 has been quarantined, Neroes said. However, Dallas County health officials have ordered four close relatives of the patient, Thomas Eric Duncan, to stay home and not have any visitors until at least October 19.


BrerRabbit - 10/2/2014 at 05:25 PM

Would have been a lot simpler to put the guy up in a hotel in Africa for a couple weeks before getting on the plane. Duh.

I think it has arrived. Keep your hands clean, and don't touch your faces, folks! And wear a mask in close quarters. Who cares if it looks funny.

[Edited on 10/2/2014 by BrerRabbit]


gina - 10/3/2014 at 12:54 AM

quote:
I think the West is a little over confident that this illness can be contained in Africa and will not spread to their countries. All it takes a few ill patients to get into the U.S. undetected for this thing to get a foothold. Just imagine if it was airborne.




Don't give the Chem Trails goologs any ideas!


LeglizHemp - 10/3/2014 at 09:08 PM

i still don't think health officials are being completely honest about ways transmission can happen. although ebola is not airborne, i'm pretty sure that a person who is infectious can transmit the disease by simply sneezing on you. a sneeze can disperse bodily fluids, so can a cough. blowing your nose and improperly disposing of kleenex could infect someone, as the virus can live outside of the host for an extened period of time. sweat is also a bodily fluid and someone in close proximity to an infectious person, i believe, could catch it. clothing with any of these substances on them could spread the ebola virus. sneezing on a hand rail at the airport, a toilet seat, even sitting down to eat in the food court all could spread the disease.

its not all about blood and feces.

with that said, i still believe that western nations face little chance of an epidemic.

maybe i'm wrong about all of that, but i'm more sure than unsure that i'm not.


LUKE - 10/4/2014 at 12:35 AM

And by all means,keep them border's wide open! Good ol Obama.I hope you dumb **** 's that voted for the piece of **** are proud of your dumb ass's.But by all means ,,please repsond with your 20 dollar word's & excuses for him.


pops42 - 10/4/2014 at 01:02 AM

quote:
And by all means,keep them border's wide open! Good ol Obama.I hope you dumb **** 's that voted for the piece of **** are proud of your dumb ass's.But by all means ,,please repsond with your 20 dollar word's & excuses for him.
its a long swim to the border from west africa LUKE!.


LeglizHemp - 10/4/2014 at 01:02 AM

come on luke......this ebola thing should not be political.....the guy flew in from belgium, not africa. he was tested 3 times before he got on an airplane. yes he lied to people at the airport about his contacts. you can not force people to tell the truth. shutting down the borders ....lol....well its just not realistic.....how do you close the entire canadian border and all the coastlines? better screening procedures are needed, sure, but think about things with common sense. i'm guessing you are more conservative than progressive so the money you are proposing to spend goes against your beliefs i think. think about this too....john stewart said it better than i can

http://thedailyshow.cc.com/videos/ysfr9u/a-million-ways-to-die-in-the-u-s-

i can't get the link to post correctly....copy and paste

[Edited on 10/4/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 10/4/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 10/4/2014 by LeglizHemp]


BoytonBrother - 10/4/2014 at 03:41 PM

this is just another Y2K story. I'm sure it's something we have to watch and contain, but I find it very hard to believe this is going to be like the movie "Outbreak". It's just a convenient story for the media to eat up and get ratings. The more we panic, the more money they make.


emr - 10/8/2014 at 03:21 AM

I'd like to think its that simple - but this is spread through contact with fluids; only a bit harder than the flu since it doesn't seem to spread as simple through coughing. The flu has been deadly

The 1918 flu pandemic (January 1918 – December 1920) was an unusually deadly influenza pandemic, the first of the two pandemics involving H1N1 influenza virus.[1] It infected 500 million[2] people across the world, including remote Pacific islands and the Arctic, and killed 50 to 100 million of them—three to five percent of the world's population[3]—making it one of the deadliest natural disasters in human history.

Having worked at St. Vincent's Hospital in 1981 at the start of the AID's epidemic you learn not to take anything for granted. Even if 50 people in one area got infected and it was "contained" that is millions upon millions in health care costs


jszfunk - 10/8/2014 at 10:33 AM

I would not blow this off like it's nothing folks.


LeglizHemp - 10/8/2014 at 12:12 PM

Can Ebola spread by coughing? By sneezing?

Unlike respiratory illnesses like measles or chickenpox, which can be transmitted by virus particles that remain suspended in the air after an infected person coughs or sneezes, Ebola is transmitted by direct contact with body fluids of a person who has symptoms of Ebola disease. Although coughing and sneezing are not common symptoms of Ebola, if a symptomatic patient with Ebola coughs or sneezes on someone, and saliva or mucus come into contact with that person’s eyes, nose or mouth, these fluids may transmit the disease.

How long does Ebola live outside the body?

Ebola is killed with hospital-grade disinfectants (such as household bleach). Ebola on dried on surfaces such as doorknobs and countertops can survive for several hours; however, virus in body fluids (such as blood) can survive up to several days at room temperature.


LeglizHemp - 10/8/2014 at 03:54 PM

http://www.aol.com/article/2014/10/08/report-first-ebola-patient-diagnosed- in-the-us-has-died/20974645/?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk2%26p Lid%3D542432

DALLAS (AP) -- The first Ebola patient diagnosed in the United States died Wednesday morning in a Dallas hospital Wednesday, a hospital spokesman said.

Thomas Eric Duncan was pronounced dead at 7:51 a.m. at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas, where he was admitted Sept. 28 and has been kept in isolation, according to spokesman Wendell Watson.

Duncan's condition was changed on Saturday from serious to critical.

Duncan carried the deadly virus with him from his home in Liberia, though he showed no signs when he left for the United States. He arrived in Dallas Sept. 20 and fell sick a few days later.

Others in Dallas still are being monitored as health officials try to contain the virus that has ravaged West Africa, with more than 3,400 people reported dead. They also trying to tamp down anxiety among residents frightened of contracting Ebola, though the disease can be spread only through direct contact with the bodily fluids of an already sick person.

Health officials have identified 10 people, including seven health workers, who had direct contact with Duncan while he was contagious. Another 38 people also may have come into contact with him.

The four people living in the northeast Dallas apartment where Duncan stayed have been isolated in a private residence.

Everyone who potentially had contact with Duncan will be monitored for 21 days, the normal incubation period for the disease.

Duncan passed an airport health screening in Liberia, where doctors took his temperature and found no other signs of Ebola symptoms. But a few days after he arrived, he began to have a fever, headache and abdominal pain.

He went to the emergency room of Texas Health Presbyterian in Dallas on Sept. 24, but was sent home. By Sept. 27, his condition had worsened. An ambulance that day took him back to the hospital, where he stayed in isolation.

The hospital has changed its explanation several times about when Duncan arrived and what he said about his travel history. It has acknowledged that Duncan told them on his first visit that he came from West Africa.


emr - 10/8/2014 at 06:32 PM

I'm sure the administration will continue to state that an outbreak is unlikely and run the party line. No one who has travelled through that part of Africa should be allowed to enter our country till our safety can be insured. This is not racial; it is not political; it is medical.


LeglizHemp - 10/8/2014 at 06:48 PM

quote:
I'm sure the administration will continue to state that an outbreak is unlikely and run the party line. No one who has travelled through that part of Africa should be allowed to enter our country till our safety can be insured. This is not racial; it is not political; it is medical.


just remember Duncan flew in from Belgium. and there is an infection in spain where contacts are being watched. do we stop people from spain too? oh and in the EU people can travel freely so should all of the EU be banned also? just askin.... it is not political; it is medical.

[Edited on 10/8/2014 by LeglizHemp]


emr - 10/8/2014 at 06:52 PM

quote:
quote:
I'm sure the administration will continue to state that an outbreak is unlikely and run the party line. No one who has travelled through that part of Africa should be allowed to enter our country till our safety can be insured. This is not racial; it is not political; it is medical.


just remember Duncan flew in from Belgium.


And his travel through other countries is documented on his passport. We know where else people have travelled; unless they sneak across a border. We weren't careful with the 9/11 guys who came from Canada - but it was a matter of not being careful.

If I go to Spain, Africa; Casablanca; London and back to the US it is not merely the last of my destinations that is accounted for.

And f**k Belgium. I was there last may and have never been to a nastier more anti-American place.


gina - 10/9/2014 at 12:45 AM

The airlines ought to cough up the $82,000 for this machine that disinfects with ultra violet light. One Hundred hospitals in this country have done so and are sanitizing rooms where patients have had communicable diseases better than any former cleaning have.

http://www.xenex.com/xenex-robot/

http://video.foxbusiness.com/v/3819456768001/germ-zapping-robot-that-wants- to-kill-ebola/#sp=show-clips





[Edited on 10/9/2014 by gina]


BillyBlastoff - 10/14/2014 at 02:24 PM

US media coverage of Ebola illustrated in this cartoon:


gondicar - 10/14/2014 at 05:31 PM

quote:
US media coverage of Ebola illustrated in this cartoon:

I don't get it. Is this saying that the coverage has been racist?

On a related note, Facebook Founder Mark Zuckerberg is donating $25 million to the Centers for Disease Control to help with the Ebola fight. Of course that amounts to less than 1/10th of 1% of his net worth, but a big number and noble deed just the same. Wonder if any other billionaires will follow suit.


BillyBlastoff - 10/14/2014 at 06:34 PM

Maybe just color blind.

I'd probably just be becoming aware of the pandemic in Africa if not for LegalizeHemp beginning and updating this thread.


emr - 10/15/2014 at 12:49 AM

I surely think that concern is based on geography and not on race; 20 infected American Blacks will cause a panic


LeglizHemp - 10/15/2014 at 01:33 AM

this seems a little closer to my predictions....... no wait it doesn't. i still think this is high. i'd say around 5-7k a week in january.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/14/world/europe/ebola-outbreak/index.html?hpt=hp _t1

Ebola cases could soar to 10,000 a week; CDC: New team to help hospitals
By Catherine E. Shoichet, Laura Smith-Spark and Laura Perez Maestro, CNN
updated 8:51 PM EDT, Tue October 14, 2014

Madrid (CNN) -- It's an ominous number.
There could be up to 10,000 new Ebola cases per week in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone by the end of this year as the outbreak spreads, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday.

And now that a nurse has become the first person to contract Ebola on American soil, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it has a new plan to help hospitals handle the deadly virus.

"For any hospital anywhere in the country that has a confirmed case of Ebola, we will put a team on the ground within hours," CDC Director Dr. Tom Frieden told reporters.

The response team will include experts in infection control, protective equipment and experimental therapies. A team such as that, Frieden said, may have prevented a Dallas nurse from contracting the disease. The nurse was a member of the medical team that treated an Ebola patient who died last week.

"I wish we had put a team like this on the ground the day the first patient was diagnosed. That might have prevented this infection," Frieden said. "But we will do that from this day onward with any case anywhere in the U.S."

In addition to the many experts it sent to Dallas, Frieden said, the CDC "could have sent a more robust hospital infection control team and been more hands-on with the hospital from day one about exactly how this should be managed.

"Ebola is unfamiliar. It's scary," said Frieden. "And getting it right is really, really important, because the stakes are so high."

Speaking to reporters in Switzerland, WHO Assistant Director-General Dr. Bruce Aylward told reporters that the Ebola outbreak could get worse before it gets better.

Already, this outbreak has gotten deadlier. The mortality rate has increased from 50% to 70%, he said.
And by December, he said, there could be between 5,000 and 10,000 new cases weekly in West Africa.
Compare those December projections to the latest figures. As of Tuesday morning, there were a total of 8,914 Ebola cases and 4,447 deaths reported to the WHO, Aylward said.

"This has been a deadly disease ever since we discovered it in 1976," said Dr. Seema Yasmin, a staff writer at the Dallas Morning News and a former CDC disease detective.

"Certainly the death rate can be lowered if we don't have any delays in diagnosis and don't have any delays in treating people," Yasmin told CNN's Wolf Blitzer.

Aylward told reporters that in 90 days, officials have a goal they're aiming for: They want to see the number of cases dropping from week to week.

To start to decrease the rate of infection, the WHO says it hopes to isolate 70% of Ebola patients and have 70% of Ebola victim burials performed safely by December 1. Getting responders, facilities and plans in place to meet the goal will be very difficult, Aylward said.

Missing the goal will mean that more people will die than should have and that even more resources will be needed because the infection rate will continue to climb, he said.

Dallas nurse speaks out

Days after authorities announced that a Dallas nurse had contracted Ebola, concerns in the United States have focused on a key question: Are people who are putting themselves in harm's way to care for Ebola victims receiving the training and equipment they need?

"I've been hearing loud and clear from health-care workers from around the country that they're worried, that they don't feel prepared to take care of a patient with Ebola," Frieden said.

Every hospital in the United States needs to be prepared to handle Ebola, he said, adding that the CDC will be stepping up training efforts.

The Dallas nurse, Nina Pham, had cared for Liberian national Thomas Eric Duncan, who contracted Ebola in Liberia and died of the illness at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital.

"A single infection in a healthcare worker is unacceptable," Frieden said. "And what we're doing at this point is looking at everything we can do to minimize that risk so those that are caring for her do that safely and effectively."

At least 76 health-care workers who may have come into contact with Duncan after he was hospitalized are now being monitored for symptoms of the disease, Frieden said.

At the Dallas hospital, teams from the CDC are taking a number of steps to improve safety in handling Ebola, Frieden said. The steps include ensuring there's a site manager making sure protective equipment is put on and taken off correctly, enhancing training and limiting the number of staff providing care, Frieden said.

Pham thanked supporters for sending kind wishes and prayers in a statement Tuesday, according to the Dallas hospital where she is being treated.

"I am blessed by the support of family and friends and am blessed to be cared for by the best team of doctors and nurses in the world," she said.

Infected nurse's assistant 'helping' as doctors treat her

Health authorities in Spain said that a nurse's assistant who is the first person to contract Ebola in Europe in the current outbreak is still in serious condition but doing better.

And even as Teresa Romero Ramos lies in a hospital bed, she's doing everything she can to take care of doctors, nurses and herself, said Dr. Marta Arsuaga, who is Romero's doctor and friend.

"She is helping us to treat her. ... She was where I am now, so she knows what I have to do," Arsuaga said.
Romero's case, like Pham's, has raised serious questions about how equipped hospitals are to cope with the Ebola outbreak.

The European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control said Monday that the Madrid hospital treating Romero doesn't meet all the standards set for centers capable of Ebola care.

And in a scathing letter, Javier Limon, Romero's husband, said she received only 30 minutes of training in putting on protective gear and called for the resignation of Madrid's regional health minister over how the case has been handled.

Romero helped care for one of two Spanish missionaries who were brought back to Madrid for treatment after being infected with the virus in West Africa. Both men died of the illness.

Besides treating Romero, Spanish authorities are monitoring 81 potential Ebola cases -- 15 in hospitals and 66 at home, according to the Spanish Ministry of Health. None of them is showing symptoms of Ebola, the ministry said.

Romero is stable but remains in serious condition, Antonio Andreu, director of the Carlos III Hospital in Madrid, said at a news conference.

A spokesman for a special committee created in Spain to keep people informed about Ebola told CNN that Spain will have a contagious diseases reference center in each of its regions.

Police, firefighters and ambulance personnel, as well as hospital staff, will be trained to deal with Ebola cases.
Andreu insisted that Spain's health care professionals have the situation under control. But he said more training will be given to health care workers and new guidelines will be prepared.

"Ebola is not a problem of Spain. It is not a problem of the United States," he said. "It's a global problem."

CNN's Laura Perez Maestro reported from Madrid, while Laura Smith-Spark wrote and reported from London and Catherine E. Shoichet wrote and reported from Atlanta. CNN's Alexander Felton, Claudia Otto, Elwyn Lopez and Jason Hanna contributed to this report.

[Edited on 10/15/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 10/15/2014 by LeglizHemp]


LeglizHemp - 10/15/2014 at 12:07 PM

http://www.aol.com/article/2014/10/15/second-dallas-health-care-worker-test s-positive-for-ebola/20978344/?icid=maing-grid7%7Cmain5%7Cdl1%7Csec1_lnk2%2 6pLid%3D545879

Officials admit failures as a SECOND health care worker in Dallas tests positive for Ebola
Oct 15th 2014 4:56AM
By RYAN GORMAN

A second health care worker in Dallas has tested positive for Ebola, authorities announced.

The Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital employee was part of the team taking care of Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who was diagnosed with and died from the disease in Dallas.

The unidentified worker joins Nina Pham, a 26-year-old nurse whose condition is improving, officials said Tuesday, as the only two patients to contract the disease in the U.S.

The patient was admitted Tuesday and placed into isolation after self-reporting a fever and other associated symptoms, according to the Dallas Morning News. Potential contacts are already being identified.

"Health officials have interviewed the latest patient to quickly identify any contacts or potential exposures, and those people will be monitored," authorities said in a statement. "The type of monitoring depends on the nature of their interactions and the potential they were exposed to the virus."

A cleaning team similar to the one that cleaned the apartments of both Pham and Duncan's family was dispatched to sterilize the one lived in by this latest diagnosed patient, sources told the paper.

No further information is available, but a Wednesday morning press conference is expected to provide further details on the individual.

The diagnosis comes as CDC director Thomas Frieden admitted more precautions could have been taken to protect healthcare workers caring for Ebola patients.

The agency should have had "a more robust hospital infection control team" on the ground immediately after Duncan's diagnosis, Frieden said in a Tuesday afternoon press conference.

"I wish we had put a team like this on the ground the day the patient - the first patient - was diagnosed," he said. "We will do that from today onward with any case anywhere in the U.S."

Such a team was dispatched to Dallas this week, the agency previously announced, and will be deployed anywhere that Ebola is found.

"For any hospital anywhere in the country that has a confirmed case of Ebola, we will put a team on the ground within hours [with] some of the world's leading experts on how to take care of and protect health care workers from Ebola infection," said Frieden.

"I think we could, in retrospect, with 20-20 hindsight - we could have sent a more robust hospital infection control team and been more hands-on with the hospital from Day One about exactly how this should be managed," he admitted.

"Ebola is unfamiliar. It's scary, and getting it right is really, really important, because the stakes are so high."


emr - 10/15/2014 at 01:55 PM

AGAIN - CLOSE THE BORDERS TO PEOPLE WHO HAVE TRAVELLED TO WEST AFRICA - SEND AS MUCH HELP/AID AS POSSIBLE. THE ADMINISTRATION IS BEING COMPLETELY IRRESPONSIBLE IN AN ATTEMPT TO BE PC. THIS SPREADS ALMOST AS EASILY AS THE FLU; 100 TIMES EASIER THAN AIDS AND IT IS DEADLIER.

ENOUGH IS ENOUGH.


tbomike - 10/15/2014 at 02:48 PM

OMG, you put that in all caps. I am so scared about ebola now. What am I going to do, we are all DOOMED.


LUKE - 10/15/2014 at 03:16 PM

Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.
#1 Why didn't they treat these cases in Nebraska? It's not near as populated and they are TRAINED to handle something like this.Hell no! Put em in Texas & cripple their economy.And as we all know.If Texas goes down ,we all do.And by all means keep those people with GOD only know's what(TB etc) comin across the border as well.It's in the cards to bring Texas down.Can't have them gun totin,hardcore patriots strong,organized and on the loose.
#2 Keep the flight's from Africa comin full force.LMFAO,,,,while the agents are there with their temp guns to check their temp before they board and exit.What a joke. Obama is determined to bring this nation to it's knees.
Ya still think all those plastic coffins and fema camps are conspiracy paranoia? And talk of Obama declaring martial law before he exit's the office is BS as well? If you do,,,there has been a new level of stupidity reached.


tbomike - 10/15/2014 at 03:19 PM

quote:
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.
#1 Why didn't they treat these cases in Nebraska? It's not near as populated and they are TRAINED to handle something like this.Hell no! Put em in Texas & cripple their economy.And as we all know.If Texas goes down ,we all do.And by all means keep those people with GOD only know's what(TB etc) comin across the border as well.It's in the cards to bring Texas down.Can't have them gun totin,hardcore patriots strong,organized and on the loose.
#2 Keep the flight's from Africa comin full force.LMFAO,,,,while the agents are there with their temp guns to check their temp before they board and exit.What a joke. Obama is determined to bring this nation to it's knees.
Ya still think all those plastic coffins and fema camps are conspiracy paranoia? And talk of Obama declaring martial law before he exit's the office is BS as well? If you do,,,there has been a new level of stupidity reached.



No you brainless wonder I am not now an Obama fan nor did I vote for him. So hillbilly boy try again.


emr - 10/15/2014 at 05:54 PM

Those caps were intentional. I was an Intern at St. Vincent's Hospital in the heart of Greenwich Village in 1981 - the first year of the AID's Epidemic; even before it had a name. We were terrified for ourselves; and once the route of transmission was identified breathed a little easier - but prayed it couldn't be transmitted through more casual contact. While this (Ebola) can't be spread as easily as the flu the fact that two workers got infected without a needle stick is scary as hell. Maybe we should send one of them to the White House and one to your house since it "is unlikely that it will spread." This is a global pandemic that could end up like the 1918 flu outbreak. This is not a trivial matter.


Bill_Graham - 10/15/2014 at 06:01 PM

I realize that drug companies spend their research dollars on drugs that make money but seems to me if the Western Govt's of the world all chipped in to fund research they could come up with a cure? Why not another Manhattan Project to find a cure? While this disease seems to be limited, for now, to underdeveloped African countries it worries me that this threat is being underestimated by the Western World.


LeglizHemp - 10/15/2014 at 06:03 PM

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/this-math-model-is-predicting-the-ebola-ou tbreak-with-incredible-accuracy

This Math Model Is Predicting the Ebola Outbreak with Incredible Accuracy
Written by
Michael Byrne
Editor
October 14, 2014 // 04:10 PM EST

Part of the allure of epidemiology is being able to describe and predict highly dynamic outbreaks with simple, clean mathematical models. But how close can models really get to perfectly mapping the spread of disease?

Modeling how disease spreads early in an outbreak is a major challenge as sample sizes remain low and variables high. But a recently-developed method of making short-term outbreak projections called the IDEA model has shown promise, and is even doing an excellent job of tracking the current Ebola outbreak.

"If validated, the implications of such a finding may be profound," wrote the model's creators in an open-access 2013 paper in PLOS One, "e.g., the ability to project, with a high degree of accuracy, the final size and duration of a seasonal influenza outbreak within 2 weeks of onset."



The graph above shows how the model is faring with the current Ebola outbreak. So far, it's nearly perfect. If the IDEA model continues to predict the epidemic with the same accuracy, we can expect Ebola to start burning out in December, with a total of 14,000 cases. Currently, according to the CDC there are or have been 8,400. We have a ways to go.

So how does the model work? A few weeks ago, we discussed the infamous r_0 number—which is used to calculate the transmissibility of a disease in terms of additional infections per infected individual—and a model known as SIR, which describes the powerful dynamics involved in mixing susceptible (S), infected (I), and immune (R, for recovered) segments of a population that's exposed to infection.

The SIR model is classically used to see how much an infection can grow within a population, with those susceptible becoming infected, and the infected sometimes becoming recovered or immune. (A good explainer example is this model of a potential zombie outbreak.) When combined with r_0, the models can give us the force of an infection.

Generally, epidemic models grow from the SIR framework, with each one adding a new "compartment." For example, the SEIR model adds an "E" for a population group that's been exposed, and is incubating the pathogen, but isn't yet infectious—such as when US Ebola patient zero Thomas Eric Duncan boarded his plane from Liberia in September.

The MSIR model adds "M," a group with natural, born-with-it immunity. Meanwhile, the SIS model actually removes the immune group entirely from the equations, a situation that fits the common cold and flu, in which being infected once offers no future protection.

There are several other variations on the basic compartmental model, but this is hardly the only modeling strategy out there. Both generally and as a way of informing the models above, we might turn to the IDEA model.

IDEA stands for "incidence decay and exponential adjustment." Yes, finally, we get to really talk about exponential things in the proper sense, rather than the usual casual redefinition of the term to mean "a lot."

One of the IDEA scheme's creators, Amy Greer, writes that the model is "based on the idea that we could use simple types of public health surveillance data and turn that information into reliably accurate projections of what might happen in the outbreak in the short-term."

The model attempts to make up for the usual shortcomings of the r_0 number, which, according to the IDEA creators, often fails to accurately account for epidemic control efforts.

As with the compartmental models, r_0 is at its best at the very beginning of an outbreak using sets of initial values. In an outbreak, things change fast, however, and public health responses can add a ton of variables to the mix.

Again, in the case of Ebola, how could a research have modeled the way misinformation and protests have undermined quarantine efforts? This is where IDEA is designed to be most effective.

If you remember, r_0 is technically defined as the average number of secondary infections that can be expected to result from one primary infection. In other words, this is how many people that each infected person can expect to transmit the disease to before they, the primary case, become not-infectious.

Ebola sits at around r_0 = 1.5 in the United States and closer to 2 in West Africa, where the disease has a higher chance of spreading. Keep in mind the 1.5 is an initial value and as more control measures are taken, it should decline.

Measuring the decline is where things get murky, according to Greer. Her model uses a new term d to modify r_0 like this:



The main thing here is the d, which is a factor representing some discount function that changes through time, so named because it resembles discounting in financial models. Here it's meant to represent the efforts taken to control the epidemic, vaccinations and quarantines etc. The larger d gets, the smaller the I result, which is the number of total infected individuals.

Using this first I, we can find out how I changes through time, given by this equation, where the Ret at time 0 is just r_0:



So, multiplying the R value at a given time, which is the Ret, by the first equation we got using d will tell us how many infected individuals we can expect at the next time interval (days, probably).

All that is to say that the IDEA model is a much more dynamic way to look at transmissibility as it's continuously being modified by the various control mechanisms we might put into place to limit the epidemic or, rather, the observed effects of them.

Algebraically twisting around the equations above, along with other equations in the model that predict changes in an epidemic's immune and susceptible populations, gives us some other useful predictions: The expected time an epidemic is likely to stop growing, an estimated maximum number of total infected individuals, and so on. The model can also give epidemiologists a way of determining how effective their control measures are.

Greer and her team tested the model out on data from an H1N1 outbreak in Nunavet, Canada (a reasonably isolated population). You can see the results below. Not bad: the models tracked the observed data pretty well. (Note that SI refers to how many different time intervals, the ts above, are calculated.)



In simulated epidemics, the researchers found that their model did very well with low or moderately low starting r_0 values, which SIR can have a difficult time with. According to Greer and her team, the IDEA prediction was a near-perfect fit.

"We found that best-fit projections for the IDEA model for disease dynamic systems with low or intermediate r_0 were exceedingly good, with parameters derived within 3–4 generations able to project the full extent of simulated epidemics with remarkable accuracy," the team concluded in their PLOS One paper


LeglizHemp - 10/15/2014 at 06:10 PM

There has been one case of ebola that came in from outside the usa. the other 2 cases stem from that one case for a variety of reasons. things are not out of control in the usa, nor is it anywhere close to being out of control. knee-jerk reactions to problems help no one. everyone remain calm, LOL.


LUKE - 10/15/2014 at 06:15 PM

Hillbilly boy! Been called a southern man,southern gentleman,free spirit,ol hippie,an honest man,a cool cat,the original ramblin man,buddy,as*hole,brother & a host of other coin's.But never hillbilly boy.
Might run that by Betts & catch his response.Most likely laugh his as* off.

Oh yeah! Lets don't forget racist & homophobic.But that's only been here in the end all/be all WP.So i really don't put much stock in or lose sleep over it.

[Edited on 10/15/2014 by LUKE]


LeglizHemp - 10/15/2014 at 11:02 PM

http://www.vice.com/read/ebola-isnt-a-medical-problem-883

EBOLA ISN'T A MEDICAL PROBLEM, IT'S A PEOPLE PROBLEM
By Martin Robbins Oct 14 2014

Medicine has a huge problem, and it’s this: A whole bunch of things exist that simply shouldn’t exist. For example, children in Western schools sick with the measles, or polio in Pakistan, which has seen more than 200 people affected this year alone. The latest and scariest is the large-scale Ebola epidemic still raging in Western Africa.

None of these things should be happening. We have mass immunization programs, and safe and effective vaccines for measles. The same goes for polio, which at one point looked unlikely to survive into the 21st century. Ebola cases are to be expected, but this isn’t a virus that’s really capable of world domination—there’s just no good reason why an epidemic on this scale should ever have happened.

But it did. So why?

In a word: people.

The spread of the Ebola virus in West Africa isn’t a medical problem so much as a social or a governmental problem. There may not be a proven cure for Ebola yet, but as I've written previously, the virus isn’t great at spreading in the first place. As long as you have a well-functioning health system, trained staff, antiseptic environments to work in, basic medical supplies, and a good set of procedures in place, any outbreak can be swiftly contained.
The trouble is, the parts of West Africa where this outbreak flared up have almost none of these things. In fact, you’d struggle to find a worse place for an outbreak to happen if you tried. The virus appeared on the border between Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea—countries ranked 163rd, 183rd, and 179th richest in the world by the IMF, out of 187. If that doesn’t mean anything to you, consider this: In 2006, recovering from a brutal civil war that destroyed most of its hospitals and clinics, Liberia had a grand total of roughly 50 doctors in the entire country. And now they’re dying of Ebola, too.

Aid agencies like Doctors Without Borders aren’t just pottering around offering help and blankets, they’re trying to act as a national health service on a budget of just a few tens of millions of dollars, and the job is basically impossible.

As if that weren’t bad enough, conspiracy theories abound. In August, a clinic in Liberia was attacked by an angry mob chanting, "There’s no Ebola!" echoing a widespread belief that the disease is a hoax. Last week, Newsweek reported that "in September, an article published in the Daily Observer, a major Liberian newspaper, called the Ebola virus a 'genetically modified organism' that was tested on Africans by aid agencies at the behest of the Western governments.”

Sound silly to you? It’s no worse than some of the theories being aired in the West. Rush Limbaugh suggested that Obama wants the virus to kill Americans as "revenge for slavery," while former public figure Chris Brown told his Twitter followers that the virus was a form of "population control."

The factors here are eerily similar to what we saw with polio in Nigeria. A vaccination drive working its way across Africa had left the continent almost polio-free by 2003, until medical staff met resistance in several northern states of Nigeria with large Muslim populations. Officials there had convinced themselves that the vaccine was part of a Western plot to spread AIDS and cancer, their fears not exactly eased by the growing war on terror. The attempt to eradicate the virus failed and Nigeria went on to become an exporter of the disease.

So are these people crazy? Well, think of it this way: Imagine you’re sitting in your living room and a group of doctors with strange accents and uniforms knock on your door and start waving a needle around. What do you do? Let them in and offer your arm up for a jab, or go and hide your kids under the bed? Exactly.

That’s before you even consider the history of West Africa. Sierra Leone, where health officials have admitted defeat in the face of the epidemic, has a past that’s basically a five-century catalogue of violence, rape, slavery, and oppression.

The other easy thing to blame is education: "If only that ignorant lot were better educated, they’d understand the error of their ways and accept the vaccine." This type of argument is called the "deficit model," a largely discredited theory that “attributes public scepticism or hostility to a lack of understanding, resulting from a lack of information."

The problem is, giving people more information hardly ever works. We’ve talked about this in this column before. Last year, the Royal Statistical Society ran a survey in which they found out that the British public is basically wrong about everything. Worse than that, even when they were given the correct answer to questions like, "How many immigrants are there?" they simply refused to believe it. In fact, as the MMR vaccine panic showed, more knowledge can even have the opposite effect: The parents who stopped their children from getting their shots during the scare of the late-90s and early-00s were more likely to be university-educated and to read up about the vaccine from a wide variety of sources.

In all of these cases—MMR, polio, Ebola—we’ve effectively reached the limit of what modern medicine can ever hope to achieve. You can create the most sophisticated medicines and vaccines in the universe, but none of that matters if most countries can’t afford them—or even afford to train doctors in the first place. (Or, of course, if parents refuse to allow their kids to take them.)

This isn’t a remote problem, either. You can set up all the screening programs you like, but sooner or later some of these plagues will make their way here. Diseases more contagious than Ebola (like malaria) used to be common on our shores and could easily return in my lifetime. Viruses and bacteria don’t really care about human borders. We’re all part of the same global system, and if we don’t work to eradicate these enemies abroad, we can’t be surprised when they eventually find us at home.

The panic in the West isn't proportional to the tiny threat the virus poses here. Still, it’s an important reminder that however well defended we think we are by our medicines, vaccines, antiseptics, and hazmat suits, we will never be safe until we deal with the failings of people. Ebola may not be the Big One, but the next disease could be.


BillyBlastoff - 10/15/2014 at 11:35 PM

quote:
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.


Gosh LUKE - why are you blaming Obama? Isn't this really God's fault?


jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 03:27 AM

quote:
quote:
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.


Gosh LUKE - why are you blaming Obama? Isn't this really God's fault?
Ebola came from Africa,

Obama was born in Kenya.

Connect the dots.


emr - 10/16/2014 at 12:28 PM

So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!


BillyBlastoff - 10/16/2014 at 12:31 PM

quote:
So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!


There are reports the nurse checked with the CDC and they said, "sure - go ahead and fly. What could happen."


Bill_Graham - 10/16/2014 at 01:34 PM

quote:
quote:
So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!


There are reports the nurse checked with the CDC and they said, "sure - go ahead and fly. What could happen."


And you wonder why people don't trust what the government tells us. JMO but I don't think the CDC or the U.S Heathcare system could manage an outbreak here in the U.S.

It is coming into Flu season here in the U.S. and I got my flu shot yesterday. So how are people going to know if they have the flu or ebola as the symptoms are similar at the beginning of the illnesses?

I am sure we all know people who will go to work no matter how sick they are so how do you control the spread of Ebola if this type of person goes to work and innocently spreads the disease?

I have no faith in our containment system here in the U.S.


alloak41 - 10/16/2014 at 03:21 PM

Why couldn't Obama use his pen and phone and say, "Any person from West
Africa is prohibited from entering the United States, until further notice. Period."

Now it's too late. Why does he want to bring Ebola into this country?


jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 03:37 PM

quote:
It is coming into Flu season here in the U.S. and I got my flu shot yesterday. So how are people going to know if they have the flu or ebola as the symptoms are similar at the beginning of the illnesses?


This is a potentially big problem. The amount of people who get the flu and then overwhelm hospital emergency rooms may slow our healthcare system to a crawl.


Anyone here ever read Stephen King's book The Stand?


alloak41 - 10/16/2014 at 03:46 PM

Whoa.

How did flu get on this thread? Wow, what a swerve! Amazing! Nobody can understand how flu got on this thread!


dougrhon - 10/16/2014 at 04:06 PM

Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.


jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 04:12 PM

quote:
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.



Seriously? 2 people have been diagnosed with ebola in this country and Obama is minimizing it? 2 people?


emr - 10/16/2014 at 04:40 PM

quote:
Why couldn't Obama use his pen and phone and say, "Any person from West
Africa is prohibited from entering the United States, until further notice. Period."

Now it's too late. Why does he want to bring Ebola into this country?


It is not too late to stop an epidemic; and re: the person below said its only two people.; I'd rather stop an epidemic than control it. Kind of like saying "only two trees are burning in So Cal. We have nothing to gain by not limiting travel to/from those countries and a lot potentially to lose.


Bill_Graham - 10/16/2014 at 05:25 PM

quote:
quote:
It is coming into Flu season here in the U.S. and I got my flu shot yesterday. So how are people going to know if they have the flu or ebola as the symptoms are similar at the beginning of the illnesses?


This is a potentially big problem. The amount of people who get the flu and then overwhelm hospital emergency rooms may slow our healthcare system to a crawl.


Anyone here ever read Stephen King's book The Stand?


My point is the early symptoms of ebola are similar to the flu so it is possible someone with ebola would not know they had it thinking it was just the flu and continue to interact with other people in the initial stages of the disease. This could lead to them spreading the virus. There are people I work with who pride themselves in never missing work no matter how sick they are.

I am also not convinced the CDC has adequate plan in place should this disease get out of control here in the U.S. and how many small local hospitals actually have the protocol to handle an outbreak effectively? I don't lay awake a night worrying about this but it is just a thought.


gondicar - 10/16/2014 at 06:25 PM


BIGV - 10/16/2014 at 06:37 PM



If this image doesn't scare you or make you visualize a Steven King movie come to life, well...I wonder.

Why ALL travel to this country has not been shut down, boggles my mind. At the very least, EVERY person entering the USA should be placed in quarantine until determined to be a non-carrier.

How about that border with Mexico?

Imho, once again, $$ is the concern here, not the obligation of the Gubmint to protect its citizens.

[Edited on 10/16/2014 by BIGV]


LeglizHemp - 10/16/2014 at 06:44 PM

so you get terrified of a picture taken because some joker said he had ebola and the plane had to be diverted to remove this idiot?

http://nypost.com/2014/10/10/man-removed-from-plane-after-joke-about-having -ebola/

that explains a lot about the hysteria this week.

[Edited on 10/16/2014 by LeglizHemp]


2112 - 10/16/2014 at 07:20 PM

quote:

Why ALL travel to this country has not been shut down, boggles my mind. At the very least, EVERY person entering the USA should be placed in quarantine until determined to be a non-carrier.

How about that border with Mexico?

Imho, once again, $$ is the concern here, not the obligation of the Gubmint to protect its citizens.



Wow! So you want to ruin the entire US economy because 1 person has entered the US with ebola? And since when are there any ebola cases in Mexico? Why are you not mentioning closing the border with Canada? You do know that in the time it took you to read this post, not a single American has died from ebola but several have died from other infectious diseases.


BIGV - 10/16/2014 at 07:24 PM

quote:
so you get terrified of a picture taken because some joker said he had ebola and the plane had to be diverted to remove this idiot?


No. it bothers me because of the measures taken at the thought of someone being infected. If the pros sent in to remove this guy had suits on, what message does this send to the others on the plane who are not wearing this type of protection? If there was no threat, why the precaution?


gondicar - 10/16/2014 at 07:30 PM

quote:
quote:
so you get terrified of a picture taken because some joker said he had ebola and the plane had to be diverted to remove this idiot?


No. it bothers me because of the measures taken at the thought of someone being infected. If the pros sent in to remove this guy had suits on, what message does this send to the others on the plane who are not wearing this type of protection? If there was no threat, why the precaution?

Come on, really?


BoytonBrother - 10/16/2014 at 09:06 PM

LOL!!! It's all Obama's fault!!!!! He wants Ebola in this country!!! LOL! How can you type that with a straight face?

Ebola is serious, but the panic and blame is silly. Wake up.


BoytonBrother - 10/16/2014 at 09:07 PM

Panic and blame the President......such great qualities to demonstrate. Way to reach for the stars.


BoytonBrother - 10/16/2014 at 09:11 PM

Is there a negative story about the US that ISN'T Obama's fault? He doesn't impress me either but I still want to accurately analyze a story and focus on the actual issues. Who are you serving by blaming and attacking Obama for EVERYTHING? It doesn't behoove anyone to go that route because it's blatantky foolish. I swear some of you could find a way to blame Obama for a pothole in your neighborhood.


BoytonBrother - 10/16/2014 at 09:20 PM

C'mon, Canada? Canada can do no wrong. First, their leader quarantines everyone coming into the country. Second, they banned flights from Western Africa. What's that you say? They haven't done either? I AM OUTRAGED. WHO IS THE PRESIDENT OF CANADA? ITS HIS FAULT!!! WHY DOES HE WANT EBOLA IN CANADA?


jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 09:54 PM

This will anger some of our sensitive conservatives on here.


PhotoRon286 - 10/16/2014 at 09:55 PM

quote:
C'mon, Canada? Canada can do no wrong. First, their leader quarantines everyone coming into the country. Second, they banned flights from Western Africa. What's that you say? They haven't done either? I AM OUTRAGED. WHO IS THE PRESIDENT OF CANADA? ITS HIS FAULT!!! WHY DOES HE WANT EBOLA IN CANADA?


HAHAHAHAHAHAA!!!!!

Maybe he's conspiring with Obama to jointly rule Canada and the US!!

NEW WORLD ORDER

Don't forget the idea that Obama will declare martial law and ban elections so he can stay in power.

Just ask Luke.

He'll set you straight, and he knows Dickey.










jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 09:57 PM

quote:
quote:
so you get terrified of a picture taken because some joker said he had ebola and the plane had to be diverted to remove this idiot?


No. it bothers me because of the measures taken at the thought of someone being infected. If the pros sent in to remove this guy had suits on, what message does this send to the others on the plane who are not wearing this type of protection? If there was no threat, why the precaution?


Do you want everyone on airplanes to be given a protective suit? How about trains, buses subways, ferry boats, taxis, elevators and so on?


PhotoRon286 - 10/16/2014 at 09:57 PM

quote:
Best come outta that dream world bubble your livin in tbomike.I bet you were & are, an avid Obama supporter from the get go.And please! no one tell me that this has nothing to do with him.
#1 Why didn't they treat these cases in Nebraska? It's not near as populated and they are TRAINED to handle something like this.Hell no! Put em in Texas & cripple their economy.And as we all know.If Texas goes down ,we all do.And by all means keep those people with GOD only know's what(TB etc) comin across the border as well.It's in the cards to bring Texas down.Can't have them gun totin,hardcore patriots strong,organized and on the loose.
#2 Keep the flight's from Africa comin full force.LMFAO,,,,while the agents are there with their temp guns to check their temp before they board and exit.What a joke. Obama is determined to bring this nation to it's knees.
Ya still think all those plastic coffins and fema camps are conspiracy paranoia? And talk of Obama declaring martial law before he exit's the office is BS as well? If you do,,,there has been a new level of stupidity reached.




Who gives folks like Luke these crazy ideas???

Oh yeah, loony toon radio like hannity, beck and old turd blossom el rushbo.

http://allmanbrothersband.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&fi le=viewthread&tid=136867


Muleman1994 - 10/16/2014 at 10:09 PM

And just in time to make everyone feel safe:

At today's Congressional Hearing on the Ebola outbreak, the CDC director stated: "we are open to new ideas".

Yes, the Obama administration hasn't a clue.


jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 10:16 PM

quote:
And just in time to make everyone feel safe:

At today's Congressional Hearing on the Ebola outbreak, the CDC director stated: "we are open to new ideas".

Yes, the Obama administration hasn't a clue.



No, Tom, you don't have a clue. The CDC hires its own people. Only The head of the CDC is an Obama appointee. It gets its funding from Congress. How so predictable that you would blame Obama.


jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 10:29 PM

I guess muleman feels the perfect time to replace the head of an organization is when they are trying to prevent a possible but unlikely deadly disease epidemic. Yeah, that would fix everything.


geordielad - 10/16/2014 at 10:47 PM

Be all over soon, now that white people are dying!


BoytonBrother - 10/16/2014 at 11:01 PM

I am outraged at ANY country that allows flights from West Africa! I am outraged at ANY country that doesn't quarantine visitors!! ANY country that fails at these 2 measures of prevention WANT ebola in their country! It's that simple folks. That means, I am outraged at.....the entire world except for Jamaica.


jkeller - 10/16/2014 at 11:14 PM

quote:
I am outraged at ANY country that allows flights from West Africa! I am outraged at ANY country that doesn't quarantine visitors!! ANY country that fails at these 2 measures of prevention WANT ebola in their country! It's that simple folks. That means, I am outraged at.....the entire world except for Jamaica.


You are right. We should shoot those planes down before they reach their destinations. If we do it right, maybe we can have them crash into ISIS sites. Kill two birds with one stone.


alloak41 - 10/16/2014 at 11:35 PM

Here's how we get the flight ban. Have somebody tell Obama that most of the people
flying in from the hot zone are Tea Partiers.

Done!


alloak41 - 10/16/2014 at 11:53 PM

quote:
quote:
So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!


There are reports the nurse checked with the CDC and they said, "sure - go ahead and fly. What could happen."


That CDC honcho is sailing in pretty hot water. I got to thinking that maybe since Kathleen
Sebelius if free, maybe we could get her to.................well, maybe not. Never mind.


No....How about John Koskinen? He's believable!


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 12:30 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
So now the CDC says the second Nurse infected shouldn't have flown "cause she might have been infected." Great; lets quarantine our health care workers but not the people from West Africa? Moe - please say hello to Larry and Curly!!!!!


There are reports the nurse checked with the CDC and they said, "sure - go ahead and fly. What could happen."


That CDC honcho is sailing in pretty hot water. I got to thinking that maybe since Kathleen
Sebelius if free, maybe we could get her to.................well, maybe not. Never mind.


No....How about John Koskinen? He's believable!


How about you? You know everything.


Muleman1994 - 10/17/2014 at 02:14 AM

quote:
quote:
And just in time to make everyone feel safe:

At today's Congressional Hearing on the Ebola outbreak, the CDC director stated: "we are open to new ideas".

Yes, the Obama administration hasn't a clue.



No, Tom, you don't have a clue. The CDC hires its own people. Only The head of the CDC is an Obama appointee. It gets its funding from Congress. How so predictable that you would blame Obama.

______________________________________________________________________

Wrong son.

The director is Obama's pick and is failing, just like his boss.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the national public health institute of the United States. The CDC is a federal agency under the Department of Health and Human Services"

Note that the CDC is under HHS. Not hard to figure out why the CDC is incompetent.

BTW - Obama is getting ready to appoint an Ebola Czar because the CDC has screwed the response up so badly.

Apparently Obama was furious yesterday at the cabinet room meeting on Ebola. Was it because the CDC couldn’t get a grip on the situation or because he had to cancel two fund-raising events?

Note today's N.Y. Daily News front page headline: "For God's Sake, Get a Grip" next to a picture of Obama at the meeting.

You should try a basic middle-school government course. If you are going to comment on government you should at least have a rudimentary.

And you wonder why liberals are the low-info voters.



[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Muleman1994]


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 02:33 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
And just in time to make everyone feel safe:

At today's Congressional Hearing on the Ebola outbreak, the CDC director stated: "we are open to new ideas".

Yes, the Obama administration hasn't a clue.



No, Tom, you don't have a clue. The CDC hires its own people. Only The head of the CDC is an Obama appointee. It gets its funding from Congress. How so predictable that you would blame Obama.

______________________________________________________________________

Wrong son.

The director is Obama's pick and is failing, just like his boss.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the national public health institute of the United States. The CDC is a federal agency under the Department of Health and Human Services"

Note that the CDC is under HHS. Not hard to figure out why the CDC is incompetent.

BTW - Obama is getting ready to appoint an Ebola Czar because the CDC has screwed the response up so badly.

Apparently Obama was furious yesterday at the cabinet room meeting on Ebola. Was it because the CDC couldn’t get a grip on the situation or because he had to cancel two fund-raising events?

Note today's N.Y. Daily News front page headline: "For God's Sake, Get a Grip" next to a picture of Obama at the meeting.

You should try a basic middle-school government course. If you are going to comment on government you should at least have a rudimentary.

And you wonder why liberals are the low-info voters.



[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Muleman1994]


No, Mr. Robinson, there were two cases 0f ebola in this country excluding the medical staff who came here to be treated and the one guy from Liberia who lied about being in Africa. Those two cases were the result of a breach in protocol in the Texas hospital.

So, son, how did the CDC screw up?


Muleman1994 - 10/17/2014 at 03:10 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
And just in time to make everyone feel safe:

At today's Congressional Hearing on the Ebola outbreak, the CDC director stated: "we are open to new ideas".

Yes, the Obama administration hasn't a clue.



No, Tom, you don't have a clue. The CDC hires its own people. Only The head of the CDC is an Obama appointee. It gets its funding from Congress. How so predictable that you would blame Obama.

______________________________________________________________________

Wrong son.

The director is Obama's pick and is failing, just like his boss.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the national public health institute of the United States. The CDC is a federal agency under the Department of Health and Human Services"

Note that the CDC is under HHS. Not hard to figure out why the CDC is incompetent.

BTW - Obama is getting ready to appoint an Ebola Czar because the CDC has screwed the response up so badly.

Apparently Obama was furious yesterday at the cabinet room meeting on Ebola. Was it because the CDC couldn’t get a grip on the situation or because he had to cancel two fund-raising events?

Note today's N.Y. Daily News front page headline: "For God's Sake, Get a Grip" next to a picture of Obama at the meeting.

You should try a basic middle-school government course. If you are going to comment on government you should at least have a rudimentary.

And you wonder why liberals are the low-info voters.



[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Muleman1994]


No, Mr. Robinson, there were two cases 0f ebola in this country excluding the medical staff who came here to be treated and the one guy from Liberia who lied about being in Africa. Those two cases were the result of a breach in protocol in the Texas hospital.

So, son, how did the CDC screw up?

_________________________________

Are you kidding?

1.) The CDC director's story has changed daily.

2.) The nurses did not break protocol. They followed the CDC's directive exactly and the CDC director has apologized for initially claiming they broke protocol.

3.) The nurses union president says the CDC's protocols are inadequate and don't even adhere to the AMA's standards.

4.) Nurse #1 called the CDC about flying to Cleveland and reported her symptoms. She was also on the list of 77 people that had come into contact with patient 1. The CDC said oh go ahead and fly.

The list is long.

The CDC is the typical federal gov't. agency under the Obama administration. Incompetent.



LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 03:13 AM

i love this recent quote from rand paul:

"If someone has Ebola at a cocktail party they're contagious and you can catch it from them," Paul continued. "[The administration] should be honest about that."


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 03:25 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
And just in time to make everyone feel safe:

At today's Congressional Hearing on the Ebola outbreak, the CDC director stated: "we are open to new ideas".

Yes, the Obama administration hasn't a clue.



No, Tom, you don't have a clue. The CDC hires its own people. Only The head of the CDC is an Obama appointee. It gets its funding from Congress. How so predictable that you would blame Obama.

______________________________________________________________________

Wrong son.

The director is Obama's pick and is failing, just like his boss.

"The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is the national public health institute of the United States. The CDC is a federal agency under the Department of Health and Human Services"

Note that the CDC is under HHS. Not hard to figure out why the CDC is incompetent.

BTW - Obama is getting ready to appoint an Ebola Czar because the CDC has screwed the response up so badly.

Apparently Obama was furious yesterday at the cabinet room meeting on Ebola. Was it because the CDC couldn’t get a grip on the situation or because he had to cancel two fund-raising events?

Note today's N.Y. Daily News front page headline: "For God's Sake, Get a Grip" next to a picture of Obama at the meeting.

You should try a basic middle-school government course. If you are going to comment on government you should at least have a rudimentary.

And you wonder why liberals are the low-info voters.



[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Muleman1994]


No, Mr. Robinson, there were two cases 0f ebola in this country excluding the medical staff who came here to be treated and the one guy from Liberia who lied about being in Africa. Those two cases were the result of a breach in protocol in the Texas hospital.

So, son, how did the CDC screw up?

_________________________________

Are you kidding?

1.) The CDC director's story has changed daily.

2.) The nurses did not break protocol. They followed the CDC's directive exactly and the CDC director has apologized for initially claiming they broke protocol.

3.) The nurses union president says the CDC's protocols are inadequate and don't even adhere to the AMA's standards.

4.) Nurse #1 called the CDC about flying to Cleveland and reported her symptoms. She was also on the list of 77 people that had come into contact with patient 1. The CDC said oh go ahead and fly.

The list is long.

The CDC is the typical federal gov't. agency under the Obama administration. Incompetent.



1. Not really.

2. The only way either nurse could have been infected is if they broke protocol. The investigation has not been completed as to exactly how protocol was not followed.
3. The nurses Union said that the hospital made 5 major mistakes. Not the CDC.

4. That was a mistake, but it wasn't made by Dr. Friedman.


Try again, Tom.


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 03:41 AM

Amen Shepard Smith:

Fox News' Shepard Smith railed against the media's Ebola hysteria on Wednesday.

"You should have no concerns about Ebola at all. None. I promise," stated Smith. He went on to tell viewers, "Do not listen to the hysterical voices on the radio and the television or read the fear-provoking words online. The people who say and write hysterical things are being very irresponsible."

He explained: "We do not have an outbreak of Ebola in the United States. Nowhere. We do have two healthcare workers who contracted the disease from a dying man. They are isolated. There is no information to suggest that the virus has spread to anyone in the general population in America. Not one person in the general population in the United States."

The Fox News host emphasized that political gamesmanship is skewing media coverage. "With midterm elections coming, the party in charge needs to appear to be effectively leading. The party out of power needs to show that there is a lack of leadership," said Smith.

Smith stressed, "I report to you with certainty this afternoon that being afraid at all is the wrong thing to do." He called media-stoked Ebola panic "counterproductive", saying that it "lacks basis in fact or reason."

He acknowledged that Ebola is a serious problem in West Africa, as well as for the victims and their families in Texas, but he pleaded with media outlets to stop fear-mongering about Ebola in the U.S.

"Someday there may be a real panic. Someday, something may start spreading that they can't control. And then, do you know what we're gonna have to do? We're gonna have to relax and listen to leaders. We're not gonna panic when we're supposed to and we're certainly not gonna panic now. We have to stop it."


Muleman1994 - 10/17/2014 at 03:49 AM

1. Not really.
___________________________
Daily changes as directed by Obama’s communications and political staff.


2. The only way either nurse could have been infected is if they broke protocol. The investigation has not been completed as to exactly how protocol was not followed.
__________________________________
Are you a doctor with firsthand knowledge of the situation? No you are not. The nurses followed the CDCs protocols and that is why they got infected.


3. The nurses Union said that the hospital made 5 major mistakes. Not the CDC.
_______________________________________
The nurses union said “mistakes were made” but did not exonerate the CDC and she stated that the CDC’s protocol don’t even come up to the levels dictated by the AMA


4. That was a mistake, but it wasn't made by Dr. Friedman.
______________________________________
Dr. Friedman is responsible for his agency.


BoytonBrother - 10/17/2014 at 03:54 AM

Wow, I can't believe I actually agree with Shepard Smith.

Muleman, you sound like a fool. You are not yet ready for prime time. You embarrass yourself on here. There was a murder in North Philly last week. Obama's fault, right?

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by BoytonBrother]


BillyBlastoff - 10/17/2014 at 03:56 AM

Muleman why are you blaming Obama? He is just a middle man.

Why are you not blaming God?


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 04:02 AM

If the GOP and the ridiculous right want to wonk on about Ebola maybe they should stop blocking confirmation of a Surgeon General. Or do they actually think the President should micro-manage every element of the country... and still want small government..... It's all so internally conflicting for those who claim to be Republicans nowadays.


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 04:25 AM

Muleman has resorted to inventing things. They are still trying to figure out how the two nurses contracted Ebola. But he knows it was the fault of the CDC. Then why aren't workers in the other hospitals with Ebola patients getting sick? They are following the CDC protocol. Muleman, you should stay away from topics that you are ignorant about.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 04:55 AM

quote:
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.



And no matter what the issue...

1. Mixed signals
2. Blame shifting
3. Confusion
4. Lack of accountability
5. Lying

INCOMPETENCE


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 09:45 AM

quote:
And no matter what the issue...

1. Mixed signals
2. Blame shifting
3. Confusion
4. Lack of accountability
5. Lying

Huh, sounds like a perfect description of alloak in the WP.


PhotoRon286 - 10/17/2014 at 12:04 PM

quote:
Shepherd Smith was half right.

Every case of Ebola contracted in this country is the result of people helping others.

So you see, there is no threat to Republicans.


EGG ZAKK LEE


LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 12:19 PM

well it's good that people are finally paying attention to ebola, lol, I've only been posting about it since june. the type of attention though seems to be lacking in understanding of the virus.

I still don't understand the criteria people are using to call for a ban on air travel. if some of the reasons given are applied to other deadly diseases and viruses then what is being called for is an end to all world travel forever.

a couple of examples:



What about enterovirus D68? Should US air travel be restricted so as not to kill other innocent children around the world?

A New Jersey 4-year-old died in his sleep September 24. It is the first death health officials are directly linking to the virus.

Tests have also shown EV-D68 in four other people who have died, but the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has said the role the virus played in those deaths "is unclear at this time."

As of Monday, the CDC has confirmed 594 cases of enterovirus D68 in 43 states and the District of Columbia.


and another:

The fact that we did NOT succumb to the hysteria and have a travel ban when SARS was an issue is evidence of how crazy we have become.

read about the SARS epidemic. And see how many North Americans died in that outbreak.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/T...
What you'll find is that the only travel warnings they gave was to NOT make any unnecessary trips to the region where the disease was flourishing.
They never warned to ban travel FROM those areas. And read how much Toronto whined about lost revenue.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/ame...

The World Health Organization (WHO) is withdrawing its advice to travellers to avoid the Canadian city of Toronto, saying it is satisfied with local measures to stop the spread of Sars.

Canada - the only country outside Asia where people have died of the pneumonia-like disease - was furious at the WHO warning, which has proved costly for the country's business capital.


if everytime a deadly disease or virus arises we shut down the world, well we are all smart people and understand the consequences.

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by LeglizHemp]


BoytonBrother - 10/17/2014 at 12:31 PM

How silly to make the Ebola story about the President. Only a buffoon would do such a thing. Carry on if you want to sound like a complete fool. There are plenty of valid criticisms of the President, but you choose to blame him for Ebola, LOL!!!!! And conservatives wonder why they are an endangered species. Who do you expect, under the age of 40, to buy such foolishness? I love it....in a time of golden opportunity to sway swing voters to the right, conservatives use the prescious time to blame Obama for Ebola. Great strategy!!!!


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 01:07 PM

quote:
quote:
And no matter what the issue...

1. Mixed signals
2. Blame shifting
3. Confusion
4. Lack of accountability
5. Lying

Huh, sounds like a perfect description of alloak in the WP.


Gee thanks, gondicar.

What a prince!


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 01:52 PM

quote:
How silly to make the Ebola story about the President. Only a buffoon would do such a thing. Carry on if you want to sound like a complete fool. There are plenty of valid criticisms of the President, but you choose to blame him for Ebola, LOL!!!!! And conservatives wonder why they are an endangered species. Who do you expect, under the age of 40, to buy such foolishness? I love it....in a time of golden opportunity to sway swing voters to the right, conservatives use the prescious time to blame Obama for Ebola. Great strategy!!!!


Who's in charge? As incompetent as the federal government looks whenever
a situation presents itself, it appears that NOBODY is. No chance the voters
will notice that.


Peachypetewi - 10/17/2014 at 01:53 PM

I do find the irony stunning. The party who has screamed for the last 6 years that there is too much federal government in our lives is now screaming there is not enough federal government in our lives.

Add to that they cut CDC budget and then refused to confirm the Surgeon General nominee.

I also find it amazing that when Reagan their hero was in office over 20,000 people died of AIDS before Reagan woke up out of one of his dementia induced stupors and responded.

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Peachypetewi]


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 01:57 PM

quote:
I do find the irony stunning. The party who has screamed for the last 6 years that there is too much federal government in our lives is now screaming there is not enough federal government in our lives.


It's not ironic at all. When it comes to protecting/defending the public, most would agree that's the #1 job of the government.


BoytonBrother - 10/17/2014 at 02:08 PM

Protecting the public would also entail regulating the marketing and selling of harmful products to children, but they oppose that in the name of freedom.

Alloak, if Obama is responsible for all bad things that happen simply because he is in charge, then is he also responsible for anything good that happens?


Gloucester-mass - 10/17/2014 at 02:13 PM

quote:
Every case of Ebola contracted in this country is the result of people helping others.

So you see, there is no threat to Republicans.


and no threat to Democrats because they only try to help themselves


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 02:13 PM

quote:
quote:
I do find the irony stunning. The party who has screamed for the last 6 years that there is too much federal government in our lives is now screaming there is not enough federal government in our lives.


It's not ironic at all. When it comes to protecting/defending the public, most would agree that's the #1 job of the government.

Then let's see if our do-nothing Congress can confirm a Surgeon General and stop squeezing the CDC's budget and make sure they have the resources they need.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 02:16 PM

quote:
Add to that they cut CDC budget


The CDC budget has increased 188% since 2000, but why not look
at the waste for once?

1. $400,000 for researching male sex workers in Peru
2. $1,000,000 to study sex attraction in fruit flies
3. $106,000,000 for a new "visitors center" in Atlanta
4. $10,000,000 for furniture (I keep wondering where the gov't buys it's furniture)
5. $1,700,000 to advise Hollywood on medical plots

Just a few examples.


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 02:21 PM

quote:
quote:
Add to that they cut CDC budget


The CDC budget has increased 188% since 2000, but why not look
at the waste for once?

1. $400,000 for researching male sex workers in Peru
2. $1,000,000 to study sex attraction in fruit flies
3. $106,000,000 for a new "visitors center" in Atlanta
4. $10,000,000 for furniture (I keep wondering where the gov't buys it's furniture)
5. $1,700,000 to advise Hollywood on medical plots

Just a few examples.

So you are an expert on all those topics as well? That's pretty impressive, although a link would be nice.

The fear mongering going on right now by certain politicians and their supporters is absolutely shameful and hurts out country, IMO.

http://www.wcsh6.com/longform/news/2014/10/14/ebola-facts-not-fear/17250973 /

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by gondicar]


Gloucester-mass - 10/17/2014 at 02:23 PM

quote:
Then let's see if our do-nothing Congress can confirm a Surgeon General and stop squeezing the CDC's budget and make sure they have the resources they need.


You mean money like the money spent wisely by The National Institutes of Health uncovered by a by the ·Washington Free Beacon

$2,873,440 trying to figure out why lesbians are obese
$2,075,611 was spent encouraging old people to join choirs
$2,101,064 on wearable insoles and buttons that can track a person’s weight
$2,707,067 for text message interventions to try to get obese people to lose weight.
and my favorite
$466,642 on why fat girls have a tough time getting dates



gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 02:25 PM

quote:
quote:
Then let's see if our do-nothing Congress can confirm a Surgeon General and stop squeezing the CDC's budget and make sure they have the resources they need.


You mean money like the money spent wisely by The National Institutes of Health uncovered by a by the ·Washington Free Beacon

$2,873,440 trying to figure out why lesbians are obese
$2,075,611 was spent encouraging old people to join choirs
$2,101,064 on wearable insoles and buttons that can track a person’s weight
$2,707,067 for text message interventions to try to get obese people to lose weight.
and my favorite
$466,642 on why fat girls have a tough time getting dates


Another armchair expert. Wonderful.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 02:27 PM

quote:
Alloak, if Obama is responsible for all bad things that happen simply because he is in charge, then is he also responsible for anything good that happens?



He's not responsible for bad things that happen, but he is responsible for reacting/responding
to them. If not, then who is in charge? Why do we elect a President? Someone has to be
ultimately in charge. Correct?

Again, it would appear that NOBODY is. No matter what the situation, the initial response
has been pathetic with this administration.

I hope my saying so doesn't upset you.


Gloucester-mass - 10/17/2014 at 02:28 PM

"Frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would’ve gone through clinical trials and would have been ready,”

NIH Director Francis Collins, blaming budget cuts for his agency’s failure to develop a vaccine for the deadly virus.


Gloucester-mass - 10/17/2014 at 02:30 PM

quote:
Another armchair expert. Wonderful.


So I guess you approve of those expenditures
You don't really approve of accountability apparently

typical clueless liberal


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 02:31 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Then let's see if our do-nothing Congress can confirm a Surgeon General and stop squeezing the CDC's budget and make sure they have the resources they need.


You mean money like the money spent wisely by The National Institutes of Health uncovered by a by the ·Washington Free Beacon

$2,873,440 trying to figure out why lesbians are obese
$2,075,611 was spent encouraging old people to join choirs
$2,101,064 on wearable insoles and buttons that can track a person’s weight
$2,707,067 for text message interventions to try to get obese people to lose weight.
and my favorite
$466,642 on why fat girls have a tough time getting dates


Another armchair expert. Wonderful.


These government agencies have been robbing us blind for years. Don't you care
about spending money wisely?


Muleman1994 - 10/17/2014 at 02:38 PM

quote:
Muleman has resorted to inventing things. They are still trying to figure out how the two nurses contracted Ebola. But he knows it was the fault of the CDC. Then why aren't workers in the other hospitals with Ebola patients getting sick? They are following the CDC protocol. Muleman, you should stay away from topics that you are ignorant about.

_______________________________________________________________

1.) The Texas hospital followed the CDC protocols and the nurses contracted Ebola. I didn’t say it was the fault of the CDC, I said they followed the CDC protocols and still contracted Ebola.

2.) The worker’s in “the other hospitals” with Ebola were working at Emory University Hospital where they follow an enhanced AMA protocol which obviously does work/

I am amazed at your lack of accurate information while you continue to comment. If you have a college education (and that is highly questionable), you should get your money back.

Actually, with your lack of knowledge on this subject you could easily get a job in the Obama administration where competence is not a requirement.


Muleman1994 - 10/17/2014 at 02:43 PM

With the democrats running ads that blatantly lie about the Republicans “cutting” CDC/NIH funds, even the Washington Post, a far-left rag, gives it 4 Pinocchios:

Fact Checker

The absurd claim that only Republicans are to blame for cuts to Ebola research

By Glenn Kessler October 15

Editor's note: This ad contains graphic images. The Agenda Project Action Fund, a progressive non-profit group, blames Republican spending cuts for Ebola deaths in this ad. (The Agenda Project via YouTube)

“Republican cuts kill”

– new Web ad by the Agenda Project Action Fund


This ad is simply a more extreme version of a new Democratic talking point — that GOP budget cuts have harmed the nation’s ability to handle the Ebola outbreak. It mixes statistics — the budget for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) “cut” $585 million (the ad offers no date range) — with disturbing images of the outbreak and various Republican leaders saying variations of the word “cut.”

A slightly more nuanced version of this theme was launched by the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, which in online advertising began to equate a congressional budget vote in 2011 with a vote for the House GOP budget in 2014 that supposedly protected special interests.

(DCCC online ad)

This line of attack was prompted by remarks by National Institutes of Health (NIH) Director Francis Collins, who told the Huffington Post that the agency has been working on an Ebola vaccine for more than a decade but was hampered by shrinking budgets. “Frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would’ve gone through clinical trials and would have been ready,” Collins said.

So what’s actually going on here?

The Facts

Budget numbers are especially susceptible to manipulation in political rhetoric because they are often confusing. A presidential administration will propose a budget number for an agency, and then the House and Senate will haggle over the numbers. So politicians can pick and choose the numbers they want to highlight. The big boost in spending under the 2009 stimulus law and then the automatic “sequester” budget cuts in the 2011 budget agreement have further juggled the statistics.

For the purposes of this fact check, we are going to rely on the historical numbers in official budget documents submitted to Congress by the NIH and the CDC. We double-checked a couple of years with NIH, and the differences amounted to rounding errors. This way, readers can examine the documents themselves.

For NIH (see page 11), since 2006, there has been relatively little change in the size of the budget, going from about $28.5 billion in 2006 to $30.14 billion in 2014. That’s a slight increase, but in real terms that’s a cut given the impact of inflation. (The agency also received a $10 billion windfall in 2009 from the stimulus law.) Here’s an illustration of the budget in real terms by our colleague Josh Hicks.

(Josh Hicks/Washington Post, using NIH data)

Generally, Congress gave the NIH about what the president requested — sometimes more, sometimes less. In 2013, for instance, Congress gave the NIH more than what the White House had requested, but then $1.5 billion was taken away by sequestration.

Whose idea was sequestration? It was originally a White House proposal, designed to force Congress to either swallow painful cuts or boost taxes. The law mandating sequestration passed on a bipartisan vote — and then Republicans embraced it even more strongly when they could not reach a grand budget deal with President Obama.

For fiscal year 2015, the documents show, it was the Obama White House that proposed to cut the NIH’s budget from the previous year. Moreover, we should note that President George W. Bush, a Republican, is responsible for significantly boosting NIH’s funding in the early years of his presidency.

The high point for the Obama administration’s request for NIH funding was in 2011, when the White House was seeking a budget fight with Republicans who had just taken control of the House. (No surprise that’s also the year that the DCCC chooses to highlight a budget vote.)

In the specific case of the NIH branch that deals with infectious diseases, funding jumped from $1.8 billion in 2000 to $4.3 billion in 2004 — but funding has been flat since then. Funding in 2014 was again $4.3 billion. So that’s effectively a cut over time.

As for the CDC, you will see (page 46) a similar pattern. The numbers have bounced around $6.5 billion in recent years. (CDC receives both an appropriation from Congress and, since 2010, hundreds of millions of dollars from the Prevention and Public Health Fund established by the Affordable Care Act.) Before 2008, the agency received less than $6 billion a year. In fiscal year 2013, the White House proposed a cut in CDC’s funding, but Congress added about $700 million. In 2014, the administration again proposed reducing the budget, but Congress boosted it to $6.9 billion,

(Note, as this Congressional Research Service report documents, CDC also is funded by nearly $4 billion in mandatory fees. The numbers above refer only to congressional appropriations.)
The Pinocchio Test

On many levels, this line of attack is absurd.

Obama’s Republican predecessor oversaw big increases in public-health sector spending, and both Democrats and Republicans in recent years have broadly supported efforts to rein in federal spending. Sequestration resulted from a bipartisan agreement. In some years, Congress has allocated more money for NIH and CDC than the Obama administration requested. Meanwhile, contrary to the suggestion of the DCCC ad, there never was a specific vote on funding to prevent Ebola.

There’s no doubt that spending has been cut, or at least failed to keep pace with inflation, but the fingerprints of both parties are on the knives. This blame game earns Four Pinocchios.

Four Pinocchios





LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 02:48 PM

http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/health-agency-officially-decl ares-end-ebola-outbreak-senegal-26268722

UN Health Agency: Ebola Outbreak Over in Senegal
GENEVA — Oct 17, 2014, 10:38 AM ET
By JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press

The U.N. health agency officially declared an end Friday to the Ebola outbreak in Senegal, a rare bit of good news amid the public outcry and fear over the deadly disease that remains out of control in three West African countries.

The World Health Organization said it "commends the country on its diligence to end the transmission of the virus," citing Senegal's quick and thorough response.

Cases are still spreading in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, with more than 4,500 deaths.

A case of Ebola in Senegal was confirmed on Aug. 29 in a young man who had travelled by road to Dakar from Guinea, where he had direct contact with an Ebola patient. By September 5, laboratory samples from the patient tested negative, indicating that he had recovered from Ebola. He was able to return to Guinea on Sept. 18.

The declaration from WHO came because Senegal made it past the 42-day mark, which is twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola, without detecting more such cases.

"Senegal's response is a good example of what to do when faced with an imported case of Ebola," the WHO said in a statement. "The government's response plan included identifying and monitoring 74 close contacts of the patient, prompt testing of all suspected cases, stepped-up surveillance at the country's many entry points and nationwide public awareness campaigns."

Senegalese medical staff also had help from a WHO team of epidemiologists, the nation's health ministry, Doctors Without Borders and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"While the outbreak is now officially over, Senegal's geographical position makes the country vulnerable to additional imported cases of Ebola virus disease," WHO said. "It continues to remain vigilant for any suspected cases by strict compliance with WHO guidelines."

Nigeria, which had 20 cases and eight deaths after the virus was brought by a Liberian-American who flew from Liberia to Lagos, also appears to have been beaten back its advance largely through aggressive tracking of Ebola contacts, with no new cases since Aug. 31. WHO is prepared to declare Nigeria Ebola free on Monday if no new cases emerge.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 02:51 PM

quote:
quote:
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.



4. Figuring out a way to blame Republicans (probably should be #1)


Gutless wonders.


BoytonBrother - 10/17/2014 at 03:06 PM

[quote:
Alloak, if Obama is responsible for all bad things that happen simply because he is in charge, then is he also responsible for anything good that happens?


He's not responsible for bad things that happen, but he is responsible for reacting/responding
to them. If not, then who is in charge? Why do we elect a President? Someone has to be
ultimately in charge. Correct?

Again, it would appear that NOBODY is. No matter what the situation, the initial response
has been pathetic with this administration.

I hope my saying so doesn't upset you.]

Not at all. This response is understandable. But of the 5 things you listed, what are you referring to about his handling of Ebola? I'm being serious. I haven't heard him minimize anything, give mixed signals, pass the buck, etc. If I missed it, I will admit it if I see the article.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 03:36 PM

One official says Ebola is not a serous threat, another says it is. One official says you
can't catch Ebola sitting next to someone on a bus, the next one says if you have Ebola
don't ride the bus. And so forth...

The President is taking a step in the right direction in appointing a point man (czar)
in getting everyone on the same page and to handle communications. It looks
bad when Josh Earnest contradicts a statement we heard the day before or a few
hours prior, or gets dodgy with questions.


tbomike - 10/17/2014 at 03:48 PM

quote:
http://abcnews.go.com/International/wireStory/health-agency-officiall y-declares-end-ebola-outbreak-senegal-26268722

UN Health Agency: Ebola Outbreak Over in Senegal
GENEVA — Oct 17, 2014, 10:38 AM ET
By JOHN HEILPRIN Associated Press

The U.N. health agency officially declared an end Friday to the Ebola outbreak in Senegal, a rare bit of good news amid the public outcry and fear over the deadly disease that remains out of control in three West African countries.

The World Health Organization said it "commends the country on its diligence to end the transmission of the virus," citing Senegal's quick and thorough response.

Cases are still spreading in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, with more than 4,500 deaths.

A case of Ebola in Senegal was confirmed on Aug. 29 in a young man who had travelled by road to Dakar from Guinea, where he had direct contact with an Ebola patient. By September 5, laboratory samples from the patient tested negative, indicating that he had recovered from Ebola. He was able to return to Guinea on Sept. 18.

The declaration from WHO came because Senegal made it past the 42-day mark, which is twice the maximum incubation period for Ebola, without detecting more such cases.

"Senegal's response is a good example of what to do when faced with an imported case of Ebola," the WHO said in a statement. "The government's response plan included identifying and monitoring 74 close contacts of the patient, prompt testing of all suspected cases, stepped-up surveillance at the country's many entry points and nationwide public awareness campaigns."

Senegalese medical staff also had help from a WHO team of epidemiologists, the nation's health ministry, Doctors Without Borders and the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

"While the outbreak is now officially over, Senegal's geographical position makes the country vulnerable to additional imported cases of Ebola virus disease," WHO said. "It continues to remain vigilant for any suspected cases by strict compliance with WHO guidelines."

Nigeria, which had 20 cases and eight deaths after the virus was brought by a Liberian-American who flew from Liberia to Lagos, also appears to have been beaten back its advance largely through aggressive tracking of Ebola contacts, with no new cases since Aug. 31. WHO is prepared to declare Nigeria Ebola free on Monday if no new cases emerge.



Oh this just can't be. This is the greatest crisis in the history of mankind and I am crawling back under my bed in my full hazmat suit soon as I finish this post. Obama is personally responsible for this crisis and we are all DOOMED. How dare you try to put positive news on this. You must be a Co conspirator and you must hate America. We should nuke all of Africa just to be on the cautious side. You don't see PUTIN allowing people to fly still do you?


LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 03:49 PM

http://wishtv.com/2014/10/17/obama-names-indy-native-as-ebola-czar/

Obama names Indy native as Ebola ‘czar’
By Associated Press
Published: October 17, 2014

President Barack Obama is naming Ron Klain, a former chief of staff to Vice President Joe Biden and a trusted adviser at the Obama White House, as the point man on the U.S. government’s response to the Ebola crisis, the White House said Friday.

Obama has been under pressure to name an Ebola “czar” to oversee health security in the U.S. and actions to help stem the outbreak in West Africa, where nearly 4,500 people have died from the virus.

Klain has been out of government since leaving Biden’s office during the Obama’s first term. The White House said that Klain would report to national security adviser Susan Rice and to homeland security and counterterrorism adviser Lisa Monaco.

Klain, a lawyer, also served as chief of staff for Vice President Al Gore and was a key figure during the 2000 Florida presidential election recount. He previously served under Attorney General Janet Reno in the Clinton administration.

The White House is calling the new post an “Ebola response coordinator.”

White House officials had initially resisted congressional calls to name a lead figure on Ebola, arguing that various agencies had distinct responsibilities, including the Centers for Disease Control, The Department of Defense, and the Department of Health and Human Services.

But on Thursday, Obama conceded that such a point person might in fact be necessary even as he praised his adviser for doing “an outstanding job.”

But he said that several of his advisers, including Monaco and CDC director Dr. Thomas Frieden, are also confronting other priorities. He noted that Frieden is also dealing with flu season and Monaco and Rice are having to spend time on the Islamic State extremists in the Middle East.

“It may make sense for us to have one person … so that after this initial surge of activity we can have a more regular process just to make sure we are crossing all the Ts and dotting all the Is,” he said.

Klain comes to the job with strong management credentials, extensive federal government experience overseeing complex operations and good working relationships with leading members of Congress, as well as senior Obama administration officials, including the president.

In a statement, the White House noted that as Biden’s chief of staff, Klain helped with the implementation of the White House stimulus package of 2009 created as a response to the recession and the financial crisis.

Klain is President of Case Holdings and General Counsel at Revolution LLC, a technology venture capital firm based in Washington. He is an Indianapolis native and graduated from North Central High School.


dougrhon - 10/17/2014 at 04:02 PM

quote:
I do find the irony stunning. The party who has screamed for the last 6 years that there is too much federal government in our lives is now screaming there is not enough federal government in our lives.

Add to that they cut CDC budget and then refused to confirm the Surgeon General nominee.

I also find it amazing that when Reagan their hero was in office over 20,000 people died of AIDS before Reagan woke up out of one of his dementia induced stupors and responded.

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Peachypetewi]


Protecting the citizens of the country is one thing everyone agrees money should be spent on. It appears the CDC suffers from mission creep. It's sole role should be the prevention of outbreaks of infectious disease. Nothing else. We have a DHHS to handle other public health issues.


dougrhon - 10/17/2014 at 04:05 PM

quote:
quote:
Alloak, if Obama is responsible for all bad things that happen simply because he is in charge, then is he also responsible for anything good that happens?



He's not responsible for bad things that happen, but he is responsible for reacting/responding
to them. If not, then who is in charge? Why do we elect a President? Someone has to be
ultimately in charge. Correct?

Again, it would appear that NOBODY is. No matter what the situation, the initial response
has been pathetic with this administration.

I hope my saying so doesn't upset you.


Democratic logic. Hurricane Katrina screw up by FEMA=Bush is incompetent. ANY screw up by agency under superivison of Obama (whether CDC, IRS or anything else?) How can Obama be expected to control everything.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 04:16 PM

quote:
Oh this just can't be. This is the greatest crisis in the history of mankind and I am crawling back under my bed in my full hazmat suit soon as I finish this post. Obama is personally responsible for this crisis and we are all DOOMED.


How did Thomas Eric Duncan get to Dallas? On an airliner, four days after Obama
stated that it was "extremely unlikely" that Ebola would come to America. Well,
it's here and deaths have already resulted.

If you are against a flight ban, would you be open to sitting next to a passenger
that was infected with Ebola?


tbomike - 10/17/2014 at 04:23 PM

quote:
quote:
Oh this just can't be. This is the greatest crisis in the history of mankind and I am crawling back under my bed in my full hazmat suit soon as I finish this post. Obama is personally responsible for this crisis and we are all DOOMED.


How did Thomas Eric Duncan get to Dallas? On an airliner, four days after Obama
stated that it was "extremely unlikely" that Ebola would come to America. Well,
it's here and deaths have already resulted.

If you are against a flight ban, would you be open to sitting next to a passenger
that was infected with Ebola?


I'll be flying to Dallas for a Cowboys game tomorrow. Have ZERO concern. How many people on Duncan's flights are sick?


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 04:26 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Alloak, if Obama is responsible for all bad things that happen simply because he is in charge, then is he also responsible for anything good that happens?



He's not responsible for bad things that happen, but he is responsible for reacting/responding
to them. If not, then who is in charge? Why do we elect a President? Someone has to be
ultimately in charge. Correct?

Again, it would appear that NOBODY is. No matter what the situation, the initial response
has been pathetic with this administration.

I hope my saying so doesn't upset you.


Democratic logic. Hurricane Katrina screw up by FEMA=Bush is incompetent. ANY screw up by agency under superivison of Obama (whether CDC, IRS or anything else?) How can Obama be expected to control everything.


They wanted a Democrat in the WH so bad they could taste it. Now that they
have one, they don't seem to want Obama held responsible for much of anything.
In many cases they don't even entertain the thought. Isn't that just shortchanging
him?

In addition, Liberals seem even more unhappy now than when Bush held office (as if
we even thought that was possible)


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 04:28 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Oh this just can't be. This is the greatest crisis in the history of mankind and I am crawling back under my bed in my full hazmat suit soon as I finish this post. Obama is personally responsible for this crisis and we are all DOOMED.


How did Thomas Eric Duncan get to Dallas? On an airliner, four days after Obama
stated that it was "extremely unlikely" that Ebola would come to America. Well,
it's here and deaths have already resulted.

If you are against a flight ban, would you be open to sitting next to a passenger
that was infected with Ebola?


I'll be flying to Dallas for a Cowboys game tomorrow. Have ZERO concern. How many people on Duncan's flights are sick?


What about flights from W Africa to the USA. Would you be open to sitting
next to a passenger that was infected with Ebola?





[Edited on 10/17/2014 by alloak41]


BillyBlastoff - 10/17/2014 at 04:31 PM

quote:
Would you be open to sitting
next to a passenger that was infected with Ebola?


Why? Are you offering?

Better than sitting next to a Cowboys fan.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 04:33 PM

quote:
quote:
Would you be open to sitting
next to a passenger that was infected with Ebola?


Why? Are you offering?

Better than sitting next to a Cowboys fan.


I laughed. Thanks, and you're dead-on. (NPI)


tbomike - 10/17/2014 at 04:33 PM

Dude I don't live my life in fear of f'n anything. Period. So if a gentleman sat next to me and said he was just returning from west Africa I would shrug my shoulders. Come up with as many hypothetical situations you want and my reply would be the same.


tbomike - 10/17/2014 at 04:35 PM

quote:
quote:
Would you be open to sitting
next to a passenger that was infected with Ebola?


Why? Are you offering?

Better than sitting next to a Cowboys fan.


LOL It is not contagious.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 04:35 PM

quote:
Dude I don't live my life in fear of f'n anything. Period. So if a gentleman sat next to me and said he was just returning from west Africa I would shrug my shoulders. Come up with as many hypothetical situations you want and my reply would be the same.


To each his own. I'm not sure I'd be real jazzed about getting on that plane if it
originated in W Africa or some connection with the hot zone.




[Edited on 10/17/2014 by alloak41]


LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 04:39 PM

I don't have a link to verify this but it is my understanding that approx. 150 people per day come to the USA from West Africa. In another discussion I had with someone, 99% or more of the citizens of the 3 West African nations affected make so little money that it would take 3-4 years to save up for a flight out of the country.

so its the 1%ers getting out


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 04:43 PM

Some perspective....

While so many of us are caught up in the mass fear and media-driven hypochondria over the Ebola virus, I wanted to share some things you should actually be freaking out over:

Just when you thought West Africa couldn't get any scarier, did you know 2,900 people are killed every year by Hippopotamuses? Those terrible creatures can gallop 18 MPH! And to think, I took my kids to see one at the zoo a few years ago and we were not wearing our running shoes. I shudder just thinking about it.

Did you know approximately 100 people die every year from choking on pens? My son was chewing his pen last night while doing homework. I am just sick over how close we came to losing him.

Approximately 150 people are killed every year by falling coconuts. And this is exactly why I refuse to go anywhere tropical for our next family vacation. Pack your suitcases my darlings, we're going to Russia for some family fun.

Wait a minute, I just read that falling icicles kill 100 people in Russia every year. Forget the family vacation.

Around 450 people die every year from falling out of bed. It will no longer be the thoughts of scary clowns to keep me up at night; it will be the terrifying two foot drop off I'm sleeping next to.

There are 1000 bicycle related deaths each year. Which is why I cling to my husband's ankles every Monday evening as he tries to leave for a mountain bike ride, sobbing hysterically about how selfish he is to leave me alone to raise these ?h??e??a??t??h??e??n??s? kids.

Between 170 -190 people die every year from choking on popcorn, making it one of the Top 5 Deadliest Snacks. So next time my kids beg me to make popcorn for them, I will say no, not because I'm too lazy but because I care about their lives.

Jellyfish kill 40 people every year in the Philippines. Add that to the falling coconuts and we've got a country way scarier than Liberia.

Vending machines kill 13 people every year and yet, we somehow never hear about this silent killer. The next time we walk by one of those death traps and my kid asks for a Snickers bar, I will feel completely justified to grab him and shriek for somebody to call 911.

2 million people die every year from Malaria transmitted by mosquitoes. TWO MILLION. And there is no vaccine.

36,000 people in the US die every year from the seasonal flu. 36,000. And there is an effective vaccine but many choose not to get it.

Every day 9 people in the US are killed and 1,150 are injured from texting while driving. And yet we still haven't put our phones away.

Ebola can kill you, but so can donkeys, ants and flying champagne corks. Turn off the news, wash your hands, don't text while driving and don't touch poop.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 04:54 PM

What any of that has to do with Ebola is anybody's guess...

I thought Hippos ran faster than that.


piacere - 10/17/2014 at 05:06 PM

I wouldn't want to see a victim of a falling icicle.


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 05:08 PM

quote:
What any of that has to do with Ebola is anybody's guess...

I thought Hippos ran faster than that.

You're right, it has nothing to do with Ebola. <sigh>

Still, "don't touch poop" is some good advice.

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by gondicar]


BoytonBrother - 10/17/2014 at 05:36 PM

quote:
If you are against a flight ban, would you be open to sitting next to a passenger
that was infected with Ebola?


if we know they are infected with Ebola, they cannot get on the plane. What about the theory that a flight ban might actually cause more risk?

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by BoytonBrother]


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 05:52 PM

quote:
"Frankly, if we had not gone through our 10-year slide in research support, we probably would have had a vaccine in time for this that would’ve gone through clinical trials and would have been ready,”

NIH Director Francis Collins, blaming budget cuts for his agency’s failure to develop a vaccine for the deadly virus.


Drug companies develop vaccines, not the NIH.


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 05:54 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.



4. Figuring out a way to blame Republicans (probably should be #1)


Gutless wonders.


Stay classy. Nobody blames Republicans for this, but you and Muleboy are doing a lot of fingerpointing at Democrats.


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 05:55 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Alloak, if Obama is responsible for all bad things that happen simply because he is in charge, then is he also responsible for anything good that happens?



He's not responsible for bad things that happen, but he is responsible for reacting/responding
to them. If not, then who is in charge? Why do we elect a President? Someone has to be
ultimately in charge. Correct?

Again, it would appear that NOBODY is. No matter what the situation, the initial response
has been pathetic with this administration.

I hope my saying so doesn't upset you.


Democratic logic. Hurricane Katrina screw up by FEMA=Bush is incompetent. ANY screw up by agency under superivison of Obama (whether CDC, IRS or anything else?) How can Obama be expected to control everything.


2 people have contracted ebola in this country. 2. Is that Obama's fault?


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 05:55 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Would you be open to sitting
next to a passenger that was infected with Ebola?


Why? Are you offering?

Better than sitting next to a Cowboys fan.


LOL It is not contagious.



Thank God.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 06:19 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.



4. Figuring out a way to blame Republicans (probably should be #1)


Gutless wonders.


Nobody blames Republicans for this.


Really?

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/13/politics/ebola-agenda-project-ad/index.html


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 06:26 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
Perhaps it's coincidence but with every problem that arises this seems to be the Obama administration MO
1. Minimize the problem, not that big a deal.
2. When this is no longer tenable assure people that the problem is under control without actually doing anything.
3. When this is no longer tenable cancel an event, make a speech and take belated steps after the fact.



4. Figuring out a way to blame Republicans (probably should be #1)


Gutless wonders.


Nobody blames Republicans for this.


Really?

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/13/politics/ebola-agenda-project-ad/index.html


OK, I stand corrected. But that link is funny as the National Republican Senate Committee says that the Dems have controlled DC for the past 6 years. Alternate universe.

So, are the Republicans and people like you and Muleman gutless wonders as well? Or is that reserved for Democrats only?


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 06:29 PM

Nobody is blaming the GOP.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/democrats-gop-budget-cuts-hurt-ebo la-response-26170295


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 06:33 PM

quote:
Nobody is blaming the GOP.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/democrats-gop-budget-cuts-hurt-ebo la-response-26170295


You didn't answer my question. Are you, muleman and the GOP gutless wonders as well or is it just the Democrats?


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 06:55 PM

quote:
quote:
Nobody is blaming the GOP.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/democrats-gop-budget-cuts-hurt-ebo la-response-26170295


You didn't answer my question. Are you, muleman and the GOP gutless wonders as well or is it just the Democrats?


As far as you know. Thanks for asking.


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 07:08 PM

quote:
Nobody is blaming the GOP.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/democrats-gop-budget-cuts-hurt-ebo la-response-26170295


This is what politicians do. The R's rip into the D's at every opportunity, and vice versa. That doesn't make any of them right, and shame on anyone who buys into their rhetoric. It is not helpful and fuels the kind of hysteria and fear mongering that we just don't need. There is no Ebola "crisis" in the US. From a health standpoint, we should all be more concerned with the seasonal flu, it will kill a lot more people in this country in the next 6 months than Ebola will in the next sixty years. As will smoking, drinking, driving cars, eating fast food, etc.


alloak41 - 10/17/2014 at 07:08 PM

Anybody blaming Republicans?

http://www.theminorityreportblog.com/2014/10/16/democrats-republicans-cause -ebola/

Accusations based on lies. Really smooth.


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 07:08 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Nobody is blaming the GOP.

http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/democrats-gop-budget-cuts-hurt-ebo la-response-26170295


You didn't answer my question. Are you, muleman and the GOP gutless wonders as well or is it just the Democrats?


As far as you know. Thanks for asking.


Double standard. Thanks.


gondicar - 10/17/2014 at 07:11 PM

quote:
Anybody blaming Republicans?

http://www.theminorityreportblog.com/2014/10/16/democrats-republicans-cause -ebola/

Accusations based on lies. Really smooth.

There are links out there to support every point of view, but at the end of the day all the finger pointing is useless and foolish. It is an easy trap to fall into...no one knows that better than me, I fall into it all the time. But all we end up doing is pointing fingers at each other and nothing good comes of it. What a sad waste of time it is.

Time for the weekend...


LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 07:16 PM

i'll put these up so those on the right know their lines and those on the left are ready for them

Conservative Media Lash Out At Klain's Appointment

Rush Limbaugh: Klain Is A "Conservative-Slash-Republican Attack Dog." On the October 17 edition of his radio show, Rush Limbaugh called Klain's appointment "pure 100 percent politics," accusing him of giving "political payoffs" and being a "conservative-slash-Republican attack dog." [Premiere Radio Networks, The Rush Limbaugh Show, 10/17/14]

Fox's Geraldo Rivera: Obama Made A "Dumb Choice." Fox contributor Geraldo Rivera tweeted that Klain's appointment as Ebola "czar," was a "dumb choice," calling him a "political hack":

[Twitter.com, 10/17/14]

CNN's Ben Ferguson: Appointing Klain " Insane." CNN political commentator Ben Ferguson responded to Klain's appointment by declaring it was "insane" to appoint a "political democratic lawyer":

[Twitter.com, 10/17/14]

ABC's Laura Ingraham: Klain's Background "Is A Parade Of Horribles." Contributor for both ABC News and Fox News, Laura Ingraham, questioned why Obama's choice for Ebola "czar" wasn't a doctor, calling Klain's background "a parade of horribles" and declaring that appointments like his "always go political." [Courtside Entertainment Group, The Laura Ingraham Show, 10/17/14]

Fox Host Todd Starnes: Klain Can't "Instill Confidence In The Nation." Fox News radio host Todd Starnes criticized the appointment of Klain as Ebola "czar" on Twitter:

[Twitter.com, 10/17/14]

NRA News' Cameron Gray: Klain Appointment Shows "Administration Has Just Given Up." NRA News reporter Cameron Gray claimed that Klain's appointment made it "obvious" the Obama administration "has just given up":

[Twitter.com, 10/17/14]

RedState Editor Compared Klain's Appointment To Karl Rove Overseeing Hurricane Katrina Cleanup. Dan McLaughlin, editor for the conservative website, RedState.com, called Klain's appointment tantamount to Karl Rove overseeing cleanup after Hurricane Katrina:


LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 07:23 PM

this is for those in the middle


Bill_Graham - 10/17/2014 at 07:42 PM

quote:
quote:
Anybody blaming Republicans?

http://www.theminorityreportblog.com/2014/10/16/democrats-republicans-cause -ebola/

Accusations based on lies. Really smooth.

There are links out there to support every point of view, but at the end of the day all the finger pointing is useless and foolish. It is an easy trap to fall into...no one knows that better than me, I fall into it all the time. But all we end up doing is pointing fingers at each other and nothing good comes of it. What a sad waste of time it is.

Time for the weekend...


Well said gondicar. Instead of discussing the issue at hand people would rather point fingers at whose fault it is. I could give a rats ass about who cut the budget funding at this point as all I want to know is that the Gov has our backs and is putting a containment plan in place in case the Ebola hits the fan here.

That being said, Mule I am surprised you have not put 2 + 2 together on the cause of this issue. Think about it Obama is from Africa, Ebola is from Africa. You should jump on that and investigate as I smell a conspiracy.

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Bill_Graham]


2112 - 10/17/2014 at 09:17 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Anybody blaming Republicans?

http://www.theminorityreportblog.com/2014/10/16/democrats-republicans-cause -ebola/

Accusations based on lies. Really smooth.

There are links out there to support every point of view, but at the end of the day all the finger pointing is useless and foolish. It is an easy trap to fall into...no one knows that better than me, I fall into it all the time. But all we end up doing is pointing fingers at each other and nothing good comes of it. What a sad waste of time it is.

Time for the weekend...


Well said gondicar. Instead of discussing the issue at hand people would rather point fingers at whose fault it is. I could give a rats ass about who cut the budget funding at this point as all I want to know is that the Gov has our backs and is putting a containment plan in place in case the Ebola hits the fan here.

That being said, Mule I am surprised you have not put 2 + 2 together on the cause of this issue. Think about it Obama is from Africa, Ebola is from Africa. You should jump on that and investigate as I smell a conspiracy.

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Bill_Graham]


I heard Obama even ordered Kenya be moved from West Africa to East Africa just to cover his tracks. He's a sly one!


jkeller - 10/17/2014 at 09:23 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
Anybody blaming Republicans?

http://www.theminorityreportblog.com/2014/10/16/democrats-republicans-cause -ebola/

Accusations based on lies. Really smooth.

There are links out there to support every point of view, but at the end of the day all the finger pointing is useless and foolish. It is an easy trap to fall into...no one knows that better than me, I fall into it all the time. But all we end up doing is pointing fingers at each other and nothing good comes of it. What a sad waste of time it is.

Time for the weekend...


Well said gondicar. Instead of discussing the issue at hand people would rather point fingers at whose fault it is. I could give a rats ass about who cut the budget funding at this point as all I want to know is that the Gov has our backs and is putting a containment plan in place in case the Ebola hits the fan here.

That being said, Mule I am surprised you have not put 2 + 2 together on the cause of this issue. Think about it Obama is from Africa, Ebola is from Africa. You should jump on that and investigate as I smell a conspiracy.

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by Bill_Graham]


I heard Obama even ordered Kenya be moved from West Africa to East Africa just to cover his tracks. He's a sly one!


There is no doubt in my mind that Obama caused the wind to suddenly blow out to right field so San Francisco would win on the walkoff homer by Travis Ishikawa. Travis Ishikawa? Really? That name isn't real. Couldn't Obama invent a better name for this obvious CIA agent?


2112 - 10/17/2014 at 09:32 PM

quote:
I wouldn't want to see a victim of a falling icicle.


I blame Obama for those falling icicle deaths in Russia. If he wasn't such a wimp and if he would have nuked Russia for invading Ukraine like a strong president would have done, the radiation would have kept those deadly icicles from forming in the first place. F**kin Obama can't do anything right!


emr - 10/17/2014 at 10:20 PM

quote:
quote:
If you are against a flight ban, would you be open to sitting next to a passenger
that was infected with Ebola?


if we know they are infected with Ebola, they cannot get on the plane. What about the theory that a flight ban might actually cause more risk?

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by BoytonBrother]


Problem is we don't always know at the time they board - and while they are incubating they may still be contagious


LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 11:24 PM

http://www.cnn.com/interactive/2014/10/health/epidemics-through-history/?hp t=hp_t1


lol the opening sentence uses the most overblown numbers to estimate the future.....

[Edited on 10/17/2014 by LeglizHemp]


LeglizHemp - 10/17/2014 at 11:34 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/17/opinion/sutter-ebola-empathy/index.html?hpt=h p_t3

Where's the empathy for Ebola's African victims?
By John D. Sutter, CNN
updated 5:13 PM EDT, Fri October 17, 2014

(CNN) -- The world's response to Ebola is its own sort of tragedy.

Two facts make the point clear:

-- The United Nations has asked for $1 billion to fight the spread of the virus. As of Friday, it had collected only $100,000 -- or 0.01%. An additional $20 million has been pledged but not received, according to CNN Money. "We need to turn pledges into action," the U.N.'s Ban Ki-moon told reporters. "We need more doctors, nurses, equipment, treatment centers."

-- Liberia, meanwhile, which is hardest hit by the virus, says it requires 2.4 million boxes of protective gloves -- and 85,000 body bags, to be able to fight the virus in the next six months. Currently, it only has 18,000 boxes of gloves and less than 5,000 body bags.

Let that second number sink in.

Eight-five thousand body bags needed.

But what is actually-really-truly behind the lack of helpfulness on the part of the international community? If you listen to right-wing pundits in the United States, we should blame Obama -- who they say is having his "Katrina moment."

Those jabs are fueled more by upcoming midterm elections than reality. And they won't likely be quieted by Obama's announcement on Friday that he has appointed an "Ebola czar" to manage the U.S. response.

The true devastation, however, has been unfolding in West Africa for months. And it's the subject of far less outrage in the United States.

A more rational and deep-seated critique of the international community's relative inaction emerged in a recent BBC interview with Kofi Annan, the former U.N. secretary general, who is from Ghana.

"If the crisis had hit some other region," he's quoted as telling that news organization, "it probably would have been handled very differently.

"In fact when you look at the evolution of the crisis, the international community really woke up when the disease got to America and Europe."

It's hard not to agree that race and geography do play a role in the world's callousness. They help explain why "some other region" -- any other region, really -- would get more help.

Science tells part of the story.

There's evidence lighter skinned people have trouble "feeling" the pain of those with darker skin. Researchers at the University of Milano-Bicocca, in Italy, tested this in by showing a group of Caucasian people video clips of people of various races being **** ed with a needle. They monitored the viewers to see how their bodies responded to the sight of another person being hurt. The white viewers reacted more strongly -- or showed more physical empathy -- when white people were hurt than Africans.

In another study, "researchers found that white participants, black participants, and nurses and nursing students assumed that blacks felt less pain than whites," Slate writes.

Except for a handful of health workers, nearly all of Ebola's 4,400 casualties have been black Africans -- and these simmering biases are deeply troubling.

"Ebola is now a stand-in for any combination of 'African-ness', 'blackness', 'foreign-ness' and 'infestation' -- poised to ruin the perceived purity of Western borders and bodies," Hannah Giorgis wrote for The Guardian.

There's a long, ugly history of this sort of thing.

Consider the 1994 Rwanda genocide, or the HIV/AIDS epidemic.

"In the case of AIDS, it took years for proper research funding to be put in place and it was only when so-called 'innocent' groups were involved (women and children, haemophiliac patients and straight men) that the media, the politicians and the scientific community and funding bodies took notice," John Ashton, president of the UK Faculty of Public Health, wrote for The Independent.

The headline of his piece: "They'd find a cure if Ebola came to London."

Maybe some blame should fall on geography, as well. Americans, in particular, know very little about Africa (just try this quiz on African geography from the Washington Post). The physical distance between Africa and North America or Europe -- two global centers of financial and political power -- also could lead people to feel emotionally distant from the crisis.

"I don't know about racism, but I do know when (Ebola) was only in Africa, hardly anyone in the U.S. cared that it was killing thousands," a friend wrote in response to a question I posed on Facebook. "But now that like four people have it in the U.S., it is all-out panic."

Whatever the reason, a lack of empathy is clearly at play.

Too many people panic when Ebola hits Dallas but shrug at the gruesome reality in Monrovia. Too many worry that someone who might have been in contact with an Ebola patient has boarded a cruise ship bound for Belize -- but we don't feel for Ebola's child orphans.

I hope shining light on these realities can help change them.

I'll leave you with a passage from an essay by Leslie Jamison, a woman who worked as a "medical actor," meaning she faked illnesses for emotionally tone-deaf medical students. As she listened to the sometimes hard-headed students interrogate her about her made-up illnesses, she learned a thing or two about what it means to actually empathize with a person.

"Empathy isn't just something that happens to us -- a meteor shower of synapses firing across the brain -- it's also a choice we make: to pay attention, to extend ourselves," she wrote.

Take that as a challenge.

Pay attention. Extend yourself.

And demand world leaders do the same.


LeglizHemp - 10/18/2014 at 12:52 AM

I just had a weird thought. What if this was a test? Fake Ebola breech to make everyone involved in safeguarding us all become hyper sensitive? Airports to Immigration to Hospitals to Nurses......everyone


Muleman1994 - 10/18/2014 at 01:37 AM

Obama’s choice to get grip on the Ebola response: Ron Klain, a partisan political operative with zero medical expertise.

This was a predictable selection. While Dr. Thomas Frieden, the CDC Director tried to be the face and spokesperson of the administration's Ebola response he was clearly out of his realm. Dr. Frieden is a medical agency administrator, not a political operative.
He did try to walk the Obama administration line but just didn’t have the political gravitas to sell it.

Enter Ron Klain. His job will be to call meetings, explain the Obama administrations political spiel to the various agency heads (and threaten them) and then run to the TV cameras and Sunday morning talk shows.

For Obama, this is exactly what he needed to do. Obama needed the political bleeding to stop.

For America, it doesn’t matter. Obama isn’t interested. He is looking for only one thing, the mid-term election results and even he knows it is not going to be good for him.

As with everything, this is a political issue for Obama. He made a move today because the polls and the editorial pages told him that so far, he and his administration’s Ebola response was screwed up and the People know it.



pops42 - 10/18/2014 at 01:44 AM

quote:
Obama’s choice to get grip on the Ebola response: Ron Klain, a partisan political operative with zero medical expertise.

This was a predictable selection. While Dr. Thomas Frieden, the CDC Director tried to be the face and spokesperson of the administration's Ebola response he was clearly out of his realm. Dr. Frieden is a medical agency administrator, not a political operative.
He did try to walk the Obama administration line but just didn’t have the political gravitas to sell it.

Enter Ron Klain. His job will be to call meetings, explain the Obama administrations political spiel to the various agency heads (and threaten them) and then run to the TV cameras and Sunday morning talk shows.

For Obama, this is exactly what he needed to do. Obama needed the political bleeding to stop.

For America, it doesn’t matter. Obama isn’t interested. He is looking for only one thing, the mid-term election results and even he knows it is not going to be good for him.

As with everything, this is a political issue for Obama. He made a move today because the polls and the editorial pages told him that so far, he and his administration’s Ebola response was screwed up and the People know it.



1 American out of 319 million has ebola. you are being a bit of a c*nt no?.


Bill_Graham - 10/18/2014 at 02:13 AM

quote:
quote:
Obama’s choice to get grip on the Ebola response: Ron Klain, a partisan political operative with zero medical expertise.

This was a predictable selection. While Dr. Thomas Frieden, the CDC Director tried to be the face and spokesperson of the administration's Ebola response he was clearly out of his realm. Dr. Frieden is a medical agency administrator, not a political operative.
He did try to walk the Obama administration line but just didn’t have the political gravitas to sell it.

Enter Ron Klain. His job will be to call meetings, explain the Obama administrations political spiel to the various agency heads (and threaten them) and then run to the TV cameras and Sunday morning talk shows.

For Obama, this is exactly what he needed to do. Obama needed the political bleeding to stop.

For America, it doesn’t matter. Obama isn’t interested. He is looking for only one thing, the mid-term election results and even he knows it is not going to be good for him.

As with everything, this is a political issue for Obama. He made a move today because the polls and the editorial pages told him that so far, he and his administration’s Ebola response was screwed up and the People know it.



1 American out of 319 million has ebola. you are being a bit of a c*nt no?.


This is the same guy who said people who hate need psychological help and then claims he doesn't hate Obama. Yeah sure he doesn't.


jkeller - 10/18/2014 at 02:37 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Obama’s choice to get grip on the Ebola response: Ron Klain, a partisan political operative with zero medical expertise.

This was a predictable selection. While Dr. Thomas Frieden, the CDC Director tried to be the face and spokesperson of the administration's Ebola response he was clearly out of his realm. Dr. Frieden is a medical agency administrator, not a political operative.
He did try to walk the Obama administration line but just didn’t have the political gravitas to sell it.

Enter Ron Klain. His job will be to call meetings, explain the Obama administrations political spiel to the various agency heads (and threaten them) and then run to the TV cameras and Sunday morning talk shows.

For Obama, this is exactly what he needed to do. Obama needed the political bleeding to stop.

For America, it doesn’t matter. Obama isn’t interested. He is looking for only one thing, the mid-term election results and even he knows it is not going to be good for him.

As with everything, this is a political issue for Obama. He made a move today because the polls and the editorial pages told him that so far, he and his administration’s Ebola response was screwed up and the People know it.



1 American out of 319 million has ebola. you are being a bit of a c*nt no?.


This is the same guy who said people who hate need psychological help and then claims he doesn't hate Obama. Yeah sure he doesn't.


He is a cipher and should be treated as such.


LeglizHemp - 10/18/2014 at 03:00 AM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/17/health/california-student-meningitis-death/in dex.html?hpt=hp_t2

San Diego State student with meningitis dies; hundreds being contacted
By Saundra Young, CNN
updated 3:29 PM EDT, Fri October 17, 2014

ALL FLIGHTS BANNED from nowhere

sorry to the family for making light of this


jkeller - 10/18/2014 at 04:31 AM

quote:
http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/17/health/california-student-meningitis-de ath/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

San Diego State student with meningitis dies; hundreds being contacted
By Saundra Young, CNN
updated 3:29 PM EDT, Fri October 17, 2014

ALL FLIGHTS BANNED from nowhere

sorry to the family for making light of this


It's Obama's fault!!!!!!


Muleman1994 - 10/18/2014 at 02:16 PM

Here are the comments from the three little liberals to my post regarding Ron Klain:
__________________________________________________

Pops: 1 American out of 319 million has ebola. you are being a bit of a c*nt no?.

Graham: This is the same guy who said people who hate need psychological help and then claims he doesn't hate Obama. Yeah sure he doesn't.

Keller: He is a cipher and should be treated as such.

__________________________________________________

Nothing there.
No support or critique of Obama’s purely political appointment, only shots at me.
So typical of the lefties. When they cannot defend Obama’s continuing failures, attack the “other side” with empty rhetoric. It must be lonely in the vacuum.

Of course they wonder why the People, after kicking Pelosi out of The Speaker of The House position and so many democrats out of The House of Representatives in 2010, the People are about to kick Reid out of his “leadership” position and enough democrats out of The Senate.

There is a theme here folks. The democrats are being kicked out of government due to their failures and the People want The Republicans to lead.


BoytonBrother - 10/18/2014 at 03:18 PM

quote:
Nothing there.
No support or critique of Obama’s purely political appointment, only shots at me.
So typical of the lefties. When they cannot defend Obama’s continuing failures, attack the “other side” with empty rhetoric.


We have to concede that Obama's choice for Ebola czar is a failure just because you say so, without even seeing what the man does? We take shots at you because you are an effing idiot. Ever notice why the other conservative posters on this site never acknowledge your existence and distance themselves from you? Ever wonder why the other conservative posters receive honest dialogue from the liberals here, but you only get shots? It's because they are smart, and you are a moron. You don't warrant any serious discussion from anyone because you offer nothing intelligent or interesting. Say something smart and interesting, and you will get a serious response.


alloak41 - 10/18/2014 at 04:31 PM

quote:
quote:
Nothing there.
No support or critique of Obama’s purely political appointment, only shots at me.
So typical of the lefties. When they cannot defend Obama’s continuing failures, attack the “other side” with empty rhetoric.


We have to concede that Obama's choice for Ebola czar is a failure just because you say so, without even seeing what the man does? We take shots at you because you are an effing idiot. Ever notice why the other conservative posters on this site never acknowledge your existence and distance themselves from you? Ever wonder why the other conservative posters receive honest dialogue from the liberals here, but you only get shots? It's because they are smart, and you are a moron. You don't warrant any serious discussion from anyone because you offer nothing intelligent or interesting. Say something smart and interesting, and you will get a serious response.


So when you lower yourself with a nasty post, calling him a moron and what not, it's HIS fault and not yours?

Hmmm


LeglizHemp - 10/18/2014 at 05:07 PM

LOL, you guys are messing up my Ebola thread.


piacere - 10/18/2014 at 05:25 PM

quote:
LOL, you guys are messing up my Ebola thread.


it's the "I'm smarter than you are" virus.



funny thing is, the "moron's" vote counts as much as the genius's.


Bill_Graham - 10/18/2014 at 05:27 PM

quote:
LOL, you guys are messing up my Ebola thread.


See I told you it was Obama's fault as the conservatives here just can't resist blaming him for anything controversial. I am telling you there must be something there. Obama is from Africa, Ebola comes from Africa. The evidence is irrefutable!


Muleman1994 - 10/18/2014 at 06:25 PM

quote:
quote:
Nothing there.
No support or critique of Obama’s purely political appointment, only shots at me.
So typical of the lefties. When they cannot defend Obama’s continuing failures, attack the “other side” with empty rhetoric.


We have to concede that Obama's choice for Ebola czar is a failure just because you say so, without even seeing what the man does? We take shots at you because you are an effing idiot. Ever notice why the other conservative posters on this site never acknowledge your existence and distance themselves from you? Ever wonder why the other conservative posters receive honest dialogue from the liberals here, but you only get shots? It's because they are smart, and you are a moron. You don't warrant any serious discussion from anyone because you offer nothing intelligent or interesting. Say something smart and interesting, and you will get a serious response.

_____________________________________________________________

Do you have a reading/comprehension problem or is it because you have a need to constantly lie?

I never said Obama's choice for Ebola czar is a failure. I did say he is a political hack but fulfills Obama’s need to get a political face on the CDCs failing response to Ebola.

On the rest of your post that is simply your opinion.
Again, nothing in your post or from the other liberals here in defense of Obama policies.
Obama is a failure and the American people in every poll say so. They will further attest to their objection to Obama’s policies Nov. 4th.

If you disagree with my assessment of Obama, state so and why. So far, not one of the liberals has crafted an opposing argument.


Muleman1994 - 10/18/2014 at 06:28 PM

quote:
quote:
LOL, you guys are messing up my Ebola thread.


See I told you it was Obama's fault as the conservatives here just can't resist blaming him for anything controversial. I am telling you there must be something there. Obama is from Africa, Ebola comes from Africa. The evidence is irrefutable!

_____________________________________________

Obama is from Africa?

I thought you liberals were all "Obama is an American".

Or is it you are just confused yet again?

Never did see your support for Obama argument post... still nothing there.


Muleman1994 - 10/18/2014 at 06:59 PM

The Ebola crisis must be over.

Obama and the CDC Director have proclaimed for many weeks that the Ebola crisis could be the biggest public health crisis in over a century. With the CDC’s response failures and Obama’s “messaging” not working through the CDC Director, on Friday Obama appoints an Ebola Czar.

Oh what a difference a day makes.

Obama took to the radio waves and on Saturday, the president called on Americans across the country to help stop the Ebola hysteria.

Obama said so everyone can just relax, the government is in control…


BillyBlastoff - 10/18/2014 at 07:03 PM

quote:
Obama is a failure and the American people in every poll say so.


That just cracks me up.

Obama, born a poor black child in Kenya, becomes President of the United States and people call him a failure.

I though my Dad had high standards to measure my success.

Sheesh.


Bill_Graham - 10/18/2014 at 07:10 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
LOL, you guys are messing up my Ebola thread.


See I told you it was Obama's fault as the conservatives here just can't resist blaming him for anything controversial. I am telling you there must be something there. Obama is from Africa, Ebola comes from Africa. The evidence is irrefutable!

_____________________________________________

Obama is from Africa?

I thought you liberals were all "Obama is an American".

Or is it you are just confused yet again?

Never did see your support for Obama argument post... still nothing there.



We both know the truth Mule, Obama is an African and the Illuminati is protecting him so you and I can't prove he is not an American. I am relying on your top notch detective skills to prove he is the cause of this Ebola epidemic here in the U.S. and prove Rush Limbaugh's claim that he is doing it to get back at us whitey's for slavery so go get em tiger.


LeglizHemp - 10/18/2014 at 07:56 PM

I respect a man who learns from his mistakes probably more than a man who never made one.


Muleman1994 - 10/18/2014 at 08:30 PM

quote:
quote:
Obama is a failure and the American people in every poll say so.


That just cracks me up.

Obama, born a poor black child in Kenya, becomes President of the United States and people call him a failure.

I though my Dad had high standards to measure my success.

Sheesh.

_______________________________________

Where Obama came from is irrelevant. His job performance is what matters and he has failed.


pops42 - 10/18/2014 at 10:27 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Obama is a failure and the American people in every poll say so.


That just cracks me up.

Obama, born a poor black child in Kenya, becomes President of the United States and people call him a failure.

I though my Dad had high standards to measure my success.

Sheesh.

_______________________________________

Where Obama came from is irrelevant. His job performance is what matters and he has failed.


dont vote for him next time.


Bill_Graham - 10/18/2014 at 10:41 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Obama is a failure and the American people in every poll say so.


That just cracks me up.

Obama, born a poor black child in Kenya, becomes President of the United States and people call him a failure.

I though my Dad had high standards to measure my success.

Sheesh.



_______________________________________

Where Obama came from is irrelevant. His job performance is what matters and he has failed.




Actually he has not failed but don't worry Mule you will only have to put up with him for 2 more years until Hillary is elected President then you will have 8 more years to complain about her.


LeglizHemp - 10/18/2014 at 10:42 PM

i'll answer for him

"not if we all die from incompetence"


jkeller - 10/18/2014 at 10:46 PM

If opinion polls are used to determine whether a president is a success or a failure, then every president has been a failure. Except for William Henry Harrison. He died after one month in office. Not enough time to fail.


Bill_Graham - 10/18/2014 at 11:05 PM

Obama certainly is not perfect by any means but he is far from a failure. I posted this once before but this is an excellent well balanced article by a very smart man who has been one of Obama's biggest critics.

http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/in-defense-of-obama-20141008

I know Mule would never read anything from that lefty commie Rolling Stone magazine as he might spontaneously combust but he might actually learn a few things if he did. Yeah I know, a lost cause.


LeglizHemp - 10/19/2014 at 12:17 AM

Ebola....there should be a bitch or defend obama thread


BoytonBrother - 10/19/2014 at 01:06 AM

quote:
We have to concede that Obama's choice for Ebola czar is a failure just because you say so, without even seeing what the man does? We take shots at you because you are an effing idiot. Ever notice why the other conservative posters on this site never acknowledge your existence and distance themselves from you? Ever wonder why the other conservative posters receive honest dialogue from the liberals here, but you only get shots? It's because they are smart, and you are a moron. You don't warrant any serious discussion from anyone because you offer nothing intelligent or interesting. Say something smart and interesting, and you will get a serious response.


So when you lower yourself with a nasty post, calling him a moron and what not, it's HIS fault and not yours?

Hmmm


I don't claim to be perfect. I'm human. And he is a moron.


Muleman1994 - 10/19/2014 at 02:27 AM

And the liberal’s attacks on me continue.

Yet not one of you has presented an argument supporting Obama’s replacing the CDC director as spokesman for his administrations incompetent response to the Ebola issue with a political operative.

In the real world, that shows desperation. The liberals, unable to support Obama take to attacking those who can demonstrate his failures.

And I’m the moron?

Is your inability to craft an intelligent response due to the fact that on November 4th you political ideology will yet again be rejected by the American People?


pops42 - 10/19/2014 at 03:11 AM

quote:
And the liberal’s attacks on me continue.

Yet not one of you has presented an argument supporting Obama’s replacing the CDC director as spokesman for his administrations incompetent response to the Ebola issue with a political operative.

In the real world, that shows desperation. The liberals, unable to support Obama take to attacking those who can demonstrate his failures.

And I’m the moron?

Is your inability to craft an intelligent response due to the fact that on November 4th you political ideology will yet again be rejected by the American People?

lots of evidence contrary to your claims has been posted, I believe you being labeled "moron" was letting you off easy.


jkeller - 10/19/2014 at 03:54 AM

I never called Muleman a moron. That would be an insult to morons..


alloak41 - 10/19/2014 at 03:30 PM

quote:
this is just another Y2K story. I'm sure it's something we have to watch and contain, but I find it very hard to believe this is going to be like the movie "Outbreak". It's just a convenient story for the media to eat up and get ratings. The more we panic, the more money they make.


Out of curiosity I flipped over to MSNBC mid-week to see what was up with Maddow.

Ebola? No.

She was running an "expose" showing 33-year old footage of Reagan, and how Nancy
consulted with astrologists.

Lean Forward?


Muleman1994 - 10/19/2014 at 07:00 PM

Obama administration Eboia response failure detailed:

DR. ANTHONY FAUCI, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, says the Obama administration overstated US readiness for Ebola and the adopted World Health Organization protocol for handling patients with the virus is better suited for field work than confined hospital care.


jkeller - 10/19/2014 at 08:16 PM

quote:
Obama administration Eboia response failure detailed:

DR. ANTHONY FAUCI, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, says the Obama administration overstated US readiness for Ebola and the adopted World Health Organization protocol for handling patients with the virus is better suited for field work than confined hospital care.




Our resident expert on everything cannot read.
Or he reads but doesn't comprehend.
Or he sees what he wants to see.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/10/19/fauci-tries-to-calm-us-after-mis steps-on-ebola-amid-concerns-americans-have/

America’s top infectious disease expert on Sunday again acknowledged that the safety protocols used for the nation’s first Ebola patient were inadequate, and that the Obama administration overstated the country’s readiness for the deadly virus, amid concern that Americans have already lost faith in the government.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told “Fox News Sunday” that the adopted World Health Organization protocol for handling an Ebola patient was better suited for field work than confined hospital care.

As a result, two nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas were infected with Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who arrived from West Africa with the virus and later died.

“It was very clear … that is not the optimal way,” Fauci said.

Fauci said he wasn’t sure how nurse Nina Pham became infected, but it was “likely” because “she was not completely covered.”

As many as 4,500 people in West Africa so far this year have died from Ebola.

Fauci also tried to quell some of the fear and criticism over President Obama and other administration officials overstating U.S. readiness, including White House adviser Lisa Monaco suggesting every U.S. hospital is fully prepared to treat an Ebola patient.


“Nothing is risk free,” Fauci told Fox News. He said that what U.S. health officials need to do now is not talk about things in “absolutes.”


Fauci also announced revised guidance for health care workers treating Ebola patients, which will include using protective gear "with no skin showing,"

Fauci said those caring for an Ebola patient in Dallas were left vulnerable because some of their skin was exposed.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working on revisions to safety protocols.

Ebola's incubation period is 21 days, and Fauci noted that mark was being reached Sunday for Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital workers who first treated Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who later died of the disease.

"The ones now today that are going to be 'off the hook' are the ones that saw him initially in the emergency room," Fauci said.

Duncan was seen at the hospital on Sept. 26 and sent home with antibiotics. He returned by ambulance on Sept. 28, was admitted and died of Ebola on Oct. 8.

Judge Clay Jenkins, the chief executive in Dallas County, said that the protective order that has kept Duncan's family isolated expires Sunday at midnight.

"That's going to be a good thing for those families. They've been through so much, and we're very happy about that," Jenkins said.

But, Jenkins continued, "At the same time, we're extremely concerned about these health care workers and we continue to make contingency in the event that there are more cases."


MartinD28 - 10/19/2014 at 09:31 PM

quote:
quote:
this is just another Y2K story. I'm sure it's something we have to watch and contain, but I find it very hard to believe this is going to be like the movie "Outbreak". It's just a convenient story for the media to eat up and get ratings. The more we panic, the more money they make.


Out of curiosity I flipped over to MSNBC mid-week to see what was up with Maddow.

Ebola? No.

She was running an "expose" showing 33-year old footage of Reagan, and how Nancy
consulted with astrologists.

Lean Forward?


So did you watch an entire show, or just flip and happen to see the Nancy Reagan spot for a couple minutes? How many Maddow hourly shows did you watch start to finish this past week? Let me guess - none?

If you're truly interested in seeing what she had to say, just Google "Maddow on Ebola". But you already knew you could do that. Instead, you just wanted to do that snarky thing to which others have alluded.


tbomike - 10/19/2014 at 10:06 PM

Our resident expert on everything cannot read.
Or he reads but doesn't comprehend.
Or he sees what he wants to see.

http://www.foxnews.com/politics/2014/10/19/fauci-tries-to-calm-us-after-mis steps-on-ebola-amid-concerns-americans-have/

America’s top infectious disease expert on Sunday again acknowledged that the safety protocols used for the nation’s first Ebola patient were inadequate, and that the Obama administration overstated the country’s readiness for the deadly virus, amid concern that Americans have already lost faith in the government.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told “Fox News Sunday” that the adopted World Health Organization protocol for handling an Ebola patient was better suited for field work than confined hospital care.

As a result, two nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital in Dallas were infected with Ebola while treating Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian national who arrived from West Africa with the virus and later died.

“It was very clear … that is not the optimal way,” Fauci said.

Fauci said he wasn’t sure how nurse Nina Pham became infected, but it was “likely” because “she was not completely covered.”

As many as 4,500 people in West Africa so far this year have died from Ebola.

Fauci also tried to quell some of the fear and criticism over President Obama and other administration officials overstating U.S. readiness, including White House adviser Lisa Monaco suggesting every U.S. hospital is fully prepared to treat an Ebola patient.


“Nothing is risk free,” Fauci told Fox News. He said that what U.S. health officials need to do now is not talk about things in “absolutes.”


Fauci also announced revised guidance for health care workers treating Ebola patients, which will include using protective gear "with no skin showing,"

Fauci said those caring for an Ebola patient in Dallas were left vulnerable because some of their skin was exposed.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is working on revisions to safety protocols.

Ebola's incubation period is 21 days, and Fauci noted that mark was being reached Sunday for Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital workers who first treated Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who later died of the disease.

"The ones now today that are going to be 'off the hook' are the ones that saw him initially in the emergency room," Fauci said.

Duncan was seen at the hospital on Sept. 26 and sent home with antibiotics. He returned by ambulance on Sept. 28, was admitted and died of Ebola on Oct. 8.

Judge Clay Jenkins, the chief executive in Dallas County, said that the protective order that has kept Duncan's family isolated expires Sunday at midnight.

"That's going to be a good thing for those families. They've been through so much, and we're very happy about that," Jenkins said.

But, Jenkins continued, "At the same time, we're extremely concerned about these health care workers and we continue to make contingency in the event that there are more cases."




Not to mention this as well.


Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, today defended President Obama's choice of Ron Klain to be the administration's Ebola "czar" despite his lack of medical background, calling him an "excellent manager."

"I think that's a misplaced criticism," Fauci told "This Week" anchor George Stephanopoulos. "What we're talking about now is an Ebola response coordinator, somebody who has extraordinary, as he does, managerial experience ... leadership experience, which he has plenty of.

"He's going to rely on medical experts, like myself and Dr. Frieden and others, to do the medical things," Fauci said, referring to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention chief Dr. Tom Frieden

[Edited on 10/19/2014 by tbomike]


Muleman1994 - 10/19/2014 at 11:06 PM

Jkeller, it is real simple: just read the words slowly or find a child to explain them to you:

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said:

1.) the safety protocols used for the nation’s first Ebola patient were inadequate
2.) the Obama administration overstated the country’s readiness for the deadly virus, amid concern that Americans have already lost faith in the government.
3.) Obama and other administration officials overstated U.S. readiness
4.) And White House adviser Lisa Monaco suggesting every U.S. hospital is fully prepared to treat an Ebola patient was wrong.

If you actually watched the interview you would know that Dr. Fauci had been given the Obama administrations line and was regurgitating the political spiel by acknowledging the mistakes made but reassuring the people that they are now in control and taking the measures… blah, blah, blah.

The Obama administration failed yet again and is in damage control.

Won’t help though, The American People will send a strong message to Obama Nov. 4th when The Republicans take control of The Senate.


jkeller - 10/19/2014 at 11:12 PM

quote:
Jkeller, it is real simple: just read the words slowly or find a child to explain them to you:

Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases said:

1.) the safety protocols used for the nation’s first Ebola patient were inadequate
2.) the Obama administration overstated the country’s readiness for the deadly virus, amid concern that Americans have already lost faith in the government.
3.) Obama and other administration officials overstated U.S. readiness
4.) And White House adviser Lisa Monaco suggesting every U.S. hospital is fully prepared to treat an Ebola patient was wrong.

If you actually watched the interview you would know that Dr. Fauci had been given the Obama administrations line and was regurgitating the political spiel by acknowledging the mistakes made but reassuring the people that they are now in control and taking the measures… blah, blah, blah.

The Obama administration failed yet again and is in damage control.

Won’t help though, The American People will send a strong message to Obama Nov. 4th when The Republicans take control of The Senate.




Once again, your reading comprehension skills are nonexistent. What is it? Do you agree with Fauci or is he an Obama political hack repeating the Obama political line? You have said both. Mind you, he has been with the NIH since 1968.

Everyone is right. You really are a moron. You have no clue what you are talking about.


alloak41 - 10/19/2014 at 11:20 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
this is just another Y2K story. I'm sure it's something we have to watch and contain, but I find it very hard to believe this is going to be like the movie "Outbreak". It's just a convenient story for the media to eat up and get ratings. The more we panic, the more money they make.


Out of curiosity I flipped over to MSNBC mid-week to see what was up with Maddow.

Ebola? No.

She was running an "expose" showing 33-year old footage of Reagan, and how Nancy
consulted with astrologists.

Lean Forward?


So did you watch an entire show, or just flip and happen to see the Nancy Reagan spot for a couple minutes? How many Maddow hourly shows did you watch start to finish this past week? Let me guess - none?

If you're truly interested in seeing what she had to say, just Google "Maddow on Ebola". But you already knew you could do that. Instead, you just wanted to do that snarky thing to which others have alluded.


Whether I watched for seven minutes, 23 minutes, are the full hour; what on Earth does a 33-year old story about essentially nothing have to do with anything going on today? How is that "Leaning Forward?" That's not even Leaning Present.

And If "snarky" commentary is bothersome, why the hell would anybody watch Maddow? That woman (?) personifies the word like nobody else I can think of, with the possible exception of her protege' Olbermann. That pretty much confirms my theory on snarkiness...If you agree with what the person is saying it's not a problem at all. Just like on this site.

It would seem that, with all of what's going on in the present day, they could figure out something halfway germane to report on throughout the episode. Guess not.


Lean Forward, my @ss. More like Bend Over.


BillyBlastoff - 10/19/2014 at 11:26 PM

You should listen to Julie Mason's Press Pool on POTUS radio. That show has no purpose except to snark. Well, snark and be catty.

She does play really good bumper music though.


jkeller - 10/19/2014 at 11:41 PM

Alloak judges a show based on seeing a couple of minutes of a segment. Not the entire segment, just a part of it. I guess when your mind is made up before you start, it is easy to be that way. Alloak and Muleman, the experts of the Whipping Post. Or should I say, uninformed experts.


alloak41 - 10/19/2014 at 11:53 PM

I used to listen to Randi Rhodes and Al Franken on Air America. Now, that was entertainment! Listening to them trying to handle Conservative callers was genuine train wreck radio. They usually hung up on them, followed by Randi Rhodes making noises that sounded like the other side of Hell. Cutting edge stuff.


MartinD28 - 10/20/2014 at 12:02 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
this is just another Y2K story. I'm sure it's something we have to watch and contain, but I find it very hard to believe this is going to be like the movie "Outbreak". It's just a convenient story for the media to eat up and get ratings. The more we panic, the more money they make.


Out of curiosity I flipped over to MSNBC mid-week to see what was up with Maddow.

Ebola? No.

She was running an "expose" showing 33-year old footage of Reagan, and how Nancy
consulted with astrologists.

Lean Forward?


So did you watch an entire show, or just flip and happen to see the Nancy Reagan spot for a couple minutes? How many Maddow hourly shows did you watch start to finish this past week? Let me guess - none?

If you're truly interested in seeing what she had to say, just Google "Maddow on Ebola". But you already knew you could do that. Instead, you just wanted to do that snarky thing to which others have alluded.


Whether I watched for seven minutes, 23 minutes, are the full hour; what on Earth does a 33-year old story about essentially nothing have to do with anything going on today? How is that "Leaning Forward?" That's not even Leaning Present.

And If "snarky" commentary is bothersome, why the hell would anybody watch Maddow? That woman (?) personifies the word like nobody else I can think of, with the possible exception of her protege' Olbermann. That pretty much confirms my theory on snarkiness...If you agree with what the person is saying it's not a problem at all. Just like on this site.

It would seem that, with all of what's going on in the present day, they could figure out something halfway germane to report on throughout the episode. Guess not.


Lean Forward, my @ss. More like Bend Over.


So it appears you didn't watch any of the daily Maddow shows for an entire hour. If you would have, you would have caught the Ebola segments. How many of the other stations spent an entire hour every day or night tasking Ebola? I flipped channels & found Ebola segments & other topics on several stations being discussed. Lean forward, past history, etc. - all stations do it including your fair & balanced channel.

As to your depiction of Dr. Maddow being snarky, I find her funny & refreshing, as well as exceptionally intelligent & on top of issues - maybe not from your angle but certainly from mine. She earned a Rhodes Scholarship, graduated from Stanford with a degree in poli. sci., and got her PhD from Oxford. To me, those are impressive accomplishments. Not many can claim those.


alloak41 - 10/20/2014 at 12:13 AM

Hey now, go easy fellas. Truth be told I don't watch much besides sports on TV anymore. There are many days the set is not even turned on.


alloak41 - 10/20/2014 at 12:17 AM

quote:
You should listen to Julie Mason's Press Pool on POTUS radio. That show has no purpose except to snark. Well, snark and be catty.

She does play really good bumper music though.


She's a little on the heavy side, but pretty cute with a good ear for music? Plus, a Houston connection! Maybe we should get together. She seems like a fun hang. Is she straight?


LeglizHemp - 10/20/2014 at 02:47 PM

For days the anti-Obama, anti-Klain talking point has been repeated. Indeed, the Fox team has been adamant: If the president appoints a czar to oversee a possible health crisis, that person must have a medical background.

Except, apparently, when the president was George Bush, the health fear was the bird flu virus, and Bush's czar had no medical background. Note that prior to becoming the nation's bird flu czar, Bush's point-person served as general counsel for Amtrak.

In 2004, Bush's bird flu czar was Stewart Simonson. He worked as an assistant secretary of health and human services for public health emergency preparedness. And although he had no medical experience or expertise in public health, he did enjoy a noted career as a Republican political insider.

CNN reported that year, "HHS officials admit Simonson has no undergraduate or advanced degree in public health."

When muted questions were raised about the selection, Health and Human Services secretary Thompson defended Simonson, much as the way the White House defends Klain, by stressing the czar's experience within government, his preparedness, and his ability to get things done. During his tenure, there was no indication that Simonson's lack of medical training hindered his ability to serve as Bush's bird flu czar.

So what was the Fox response when a point-person with no medical experience was tapped by the Bush White House to coordinate the government's dealing with a possible health crisis? Fox's response was radio silence. A search of Fox archives via Nexis produces no criticism of Simonson.

Granted, Simonson's appointment did not generate the amount of coverage that the recent Klain news has, and the bird flu never claimed a life in the United Sates. But if Fox News' dire demands that Obama's Ebola czar today must, must, must have a medical background, it stands to reason the same standard would have applied to Bush's pick of Simonson.

It did not.

And it wasn't just Fox News. From what I can see, there was very little coverage of Simonson's appointment within the conservative press, and virtually no objections to the fact he had no public health training. This, of course, is the same conservative media today that roundly and relentlessly criticizes the Klain appointment.


Muleman1994 - 10/20/2014 at 03:11 PM

The background on Obama getting pissed his administration blew the Ebola response:

Amid Assurances on Ebola, Obama Is Said to Seethe

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/18/us/amid-assurances-on-ebola-obama-is-said -to-seethe.html?_r=1
______________________________________________________________________

At democratic party rally at an all black high school in an almost all black county Obama is dissed:

Obama talks, Audience Walks:

http://freebeacon.com/politics/rally-attendees-leave-event-after-obama-bega n-speaking/


MartinD28 - 10/20/2014 at 04:15 PM

quote:

At democratic party rally at an all black high school in an almost all black county Obama is dissed:

Obama talks, Audience Walks:

http://freebeacon.com/politics/rally-attendees-leave-event-after-obama-bega n-speaking/



So muleone,

What is the point you are trying to make? Enlighten us with specifics.


dougrhon - 10/20/2014 at 04:24 PM

You know something. I really wish we would stop using the word "czar" to describe a presidential appointment of an individual to oversee a certain sector of the country. I believe it was originally used by the media, somewhat tongue and cheek, in the 70's to describe an appointment Carter made for someone to oversee the energy sector. Now the president himself as well as Senators Congressman and well pretty much everyone, are using this term to describe someone appointed by the president who, in effect, has no power and is nothing more than an advisor hired to streamline multi-agency responses to a certain problem. The term "Czar" is hardly American.


Muleman1994 - 10/20/2014 at 04:31 PM

quote:
quote:

At democratic party rally at an all black high school in an almost all black county Obama is dissed:

Obama talks, Audience Walks:

http://freebeacon.com/politics/rally-attendees-leave-event-after-obama-bega n-speaking/



So muleone,

What is the point you are trying to make? Enlighten us with specifics.

________________________________________

The point is obvious.


Muleman1994 - 10/20/2014 at 04:34 PM

quote:
You know something. I really wish we would stop using the word "czar" to describe a presidential appointment of an individual to oversee a certain sector of the country. I believe it was originally used by the media, somewhat tongue and cheek, in the 70's to describe an appointment Carter made for someone to oversee the energy sector. Now the president himself as well as Senators Congressman and well pretty much everyone, are using this term to describe someone appointed by the president who, in effect, has no power and is nothing more than an advisor hired to streamline multi-agency responses to a certain problem. The term "Czar" is hardly American.

_____________________________________

An unfortunate term.

Some presidents have used that type of appointment for cabinet level positions when they want to avoid any Senate approval requirement.


MartinD28 - 10/20/2014 at 04:36 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:

At democratic party rally at an all black high school in an almost all black county Obama is dissed:

Obama talks, Audience Walks:

http://freebeacon.com/politics/rally-attendees-leave-event-after-obama-bega n-speaking/



So muleone,

What is the point you are trying to make? Enlighten us with specifics.

________________________________________

The point is obvious.



Not really. So you make a post but won't back it up with your perception - whatever that may be. That's big of you but not unexpected.


Muleman1994 - 10/20/2014 at 04:54 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:

At democratic party rally at an all black high school in an almost all black county Obama is dissed:

Obama talks, Audience Walks:

http://freebeacon.com/politics/rally-attendees-leave-event-after-obama-bega n-speaking/



So muleone,

What is the point you are trying to make? Enlighten us with specifics.

________________________________________

The point is obvious.



Not really. So you make a post but won't back it up with your perception - whatever that may be. That's big of you but not unexpected.

__________________________________________________

If you are unable or unwilling to understand the importance of the two posts I nor anyone else can help you.

You can't fix stupid.


MartinD28 - 10/20/2014 at 05:18 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:

At democratic party rally at an all black high school in an almost all black county Obama is dissed:

Obama talks, Audience Walks:

http://freebeacon.com/politics/rally-attendees-leave-event-after-obama-bega n-speaking/



So muleone,

What is the point you are trying to make? Enlighten us with specifics.

________________________________________

The point is obvious.



Not really. So you make a post but won't back it up with your perception - whatever that may be. That's big of you but not unexpected.

__________________________________________________

If you are unable or unwilling to understand the importance of the two posts I nor anyone else can help you.

You can't fix stupid.




So in essence you are spineless & won't answer a question directed at a post you made. You truly are a piece of work. You're earning your stripes on this site but not in a favorable way. You command zero respect on this board.


Muleman1994 - 10/20/2014 at 05:30 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:

At democratic party rally at an all black high school in an almost all black county Obama is dissed:

Obama talks, Audience Walks:

http://freebeacon.com/politics/rally-attendees-leave-event-after-obama-bega n-speaking/



So muleone,

What is the point you are trying to make? Enlighten us with specifics.

________________________________________

The point is obvious.



Not really. So you make a post but won't back it up with your perception - whatever that may be. That's big of you but not unexpected.

__________________________________________________

If you are unable or unwilling to understand the importance of the two posts I nor anyone else can help you.

You can't fix stupid.




So in essence you are spineless & won't answer a question directed at a post you made. You truly are a piece of work. You're earning your stripes on this site but not in a favorable way. You command zero respect on this board.



_____________________________________________________________

You are obviously unable or unwilling to read the information in the links and understand what it means.

Why should I have to explain it to you?

Yea, I know liberals don't want to hear the bad news for Obama but it is what it is: The Obama presidency is a failure and a vast majority of Americans know it.



LeglizHemp - 10/20/2014 at 08:00 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/20/health/ebola-overreaction/index.html?hpt=hp_t 2

Ebola hysteria: An epic, epidemic overreaction
By Saeed Ahmed and Dorrine Mendoza, CNN
updated 12:41 PM EDT, Mon October 20, 2014

(CNN) -- This is getting ridiculous.

While the threat of Ebola is very real in Africa, the paranoia it's generated in the United States is unreal.
You can count the number of documented cases in America on two hands -- and still have fingers to spare.

There are eight confirmed cases. And in each one, the patient was either infected in Liberia or Sierra Leone, or had contact with Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian returnee who's the sole fatality of the disease in the U.S.

Health care professionals, both within the government and those with little reason to parrot a party line, insist that the chances of any of us catching the virus are minuscule.

If we really need something to worry about, they say, worry about getting your flu shots. From 1976 through 2007, flu-related causes killed between 3,000 and 49,000 people in the U.S.

And yet, the disproportionate hysteria over Ebola multiplies contagiously.

Relatives afraid to take in Ebola orphans Spanish nurse's aide now Ebola-free Are pets exposed to Ebola a threat?

Mel Robbins, a CNN commentator and legal analyst, has given it a name: Fear-bola.

"Fear-bola attacks the part of the brain responsible for rational thinking," she says. "It starts with a low-grade concern about the two health care workers diagnosed with Ebola in Dallas and slowly builds into fear of a widespread epidemic in the United States."

How bad is it?

So bad that nearly two thirds of those queried in a Washington Post/ABC News poll said they're concerned about an epidemic in the U.S.

So bad that the Centers for Disease Control, in the first week of October, fielded 800 calls from concerned Americans.

So bad that even after a Dallas lab worker -- who isolated herself in her cabin during a Carnival Cruise because she may have possibly handled Duncan's clinical specimen -- was cleared, the Moore, Oklahoma, Public Schools asked students and faculty who were on the same cruise not to come to school.

Here are some more examples of our overreaction:

From Nigeria? Not this year

Navarro College, a two-year college about 60 miles from Dallas, sent out rejection letters to some applicants from Nigeria because the country had a few Ebola cases.

"With sincere regret, I must report that Navarro College is not able to offer you acceptance for the Spring 2015 term," the letter read. "Unfortunately, Navarro College is not accepting international students from countries with confirmed Ebola cases."

The college called it "the responsible thing to do."

"At this time, we believe it is the responsible thing to do to postpone our recruitment in those nations that the Center for Disease Control and the U.S. State Department have identified as at risk."

Incidentally, Nigeria had 19 cases, but none in the last 43 days. In fact, the World Health Organization declared it Ebola-free on Monday.

Get sick in a parking lot, force a shutdown

A woman boarded a shuttle bus in a Pentagon parking lot Thursday, got off and vomited. A hazmat team responded, the area was cordoned off, military officials going to a Marine Corps ceremony were temporarily quarantined, the woman was put into isolation.

A Pentagon spokesman said it was "out of an abundance of caution."

The woman didn't have Ebola.

Get sick on a plane, stay in the bathroom

A passenger who vomited in the aisle of an American Airlines plane from Dallas to Chicago was allegedly told to stay in the lavatory for the rest of the flight. "They told her to stay in the bathroom, and she stayed in the bathroom," Martha Selby, a University of Texas professor who was on the flight, told the Houston Chronicle. "They said, 'We can't let you out.'"

The airlines told the paper that the woman wanted to stay in the bathroom, and that "there were no concerns related to Ebola."

The woman didn't have Ebola.

Go to a conference, go on leave

An elementary school teacher in Maine was put on 21 days' leave - the incubation period for Ebola -- because she went to Dallas for an education conference. While there, she stayed at a hotel about 10 miles from Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, where a patient died of the disease.

Still, parents were concerned, and the school district said it obliged.

Here's how the Portland Press Herald put it into perspective: About 5 million Americans passed through Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport in August, the latest month for which statistics are available.

The woman, of course, didn't have Ebola.

Go to a funeral, go on vacation

A middle school principal in Hazelhurst, Mississippi, who went to his brother's funeral in Africa is now on a weeklong paid vacation. Why? Because parents pulled their kids out of school Friday once they learned of the trip. And where in Africa did the principal go? Zambia, which has reported a total of zero Ebola cases.

The principal didn't have ... you know the rest.

Don't like the team, taunt the player

A West African high school soccer player in Nazareth, Pennsylvania, was taunted with chants of "Ebola" by players of the opposing team during a game earlier this month. The opposing team's head coach and assistant coach resigned the next day.

The player ... so on and so forth.

Yell 'Ebola,' trigger panic

Last week, a masked man in a Los Angeles public bus yelled, "Don't mess with me, I have Ebola!" The bus driver was quarantined and the bus taken out of service.

The man disappeared. But officials doubt he has Ebola.

Pat down = paid leave

A TSA agent at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport is now on paid administrative leave because he/she pat down Amber Vinson. She's one of the nurses who contracted Ebola after treating Duncan. And before her illness was apparent, she took a Frontier Airlines flight to Cleveland, then a flight back to Dallas.

The agent wore gloves during the pat down, the TSA told Newsnet5 in Cleveland. And yet, the leave was "out of an abundance of caution."

Never mind that Ebola is only spread through direct contact with blood, sweat, feces, vomit, semen and saliva. And the uninfected person would have to have a break in the skin that would allow entry of the virus.

The agent hasn't shown signs of Ebola.

Game the system, stoke hysteria

A newly booked inmate in the Clark County Detention Center in Las Vegas hit on a novel way to be spared the gen pop: Tell the guards you just got back from Africa and you're experiencing Ebola-like symptoms.

He was taken away from other inmates to a hospital, the staff put on protective gear, the area was decontaminated, CNN affiliate News 3 reported Sunday.

Turns out, the guy not only didn't have Ebola, he's never been out of the U.S., let alone to Africa.

The examples go on and on, and each new day brings a couple of fresh ones.

And with flu season coming up -- with its symptoms of fever, ache and fatigue that are very similar to Ebola's -- expect the hysteria to ramp up.

"All we've known of Ebola is that it's some exotic disease in a faraway land that kills people in a very gruesome way. That's all we knew about it -- most Americans did -- until a couple of months ago," says CNN's Dr. Sanjay Gupta.

"So, it's going to take some time to reset some of that thinking."


Muleman1994 - 10/20/2014 at 09:52 PM

This Ebola issue is far from over.

Obama sent 4,000 American military personnel to the “hot zone” in West Africa.
Add to that many NGO healthcare workers.

As their deployments end or they are rotated out, where will they be go?

Democrat congressmen Shelia Jackson Lee and Keith Ellison are demanding that Obama order U.S. servicemen to get actively and directly involved with the Africans diagnosed with Ebola.

The U.S. has 4 hospitals competent to handle Ebola patients with 2 beds each.
When the American soldiers and NGO healthcare workers return to the U.S. where will they go?

The Obama administration so far has no plan, much like his ISIS response, no plan.

How long does Obama intend to leave our people in West Africa and what will he do to take care of them when they return?

Obama has no idea, no plan. Reacting to a crisis or leaving it to the next president is not leadership.

Question for the Obama liberals: What is the plan? Is there a plan?


jkeller - 10/20/2014 at 10:02 PM

quote:
This Ebola issue is far from over.

Obama sent 4,000 American military personnel to the “hot zone” in West Africa.
Add to that many NGO healthcare workers.

As their deployments end or they are rotated out, where will they be go?

Democrat congressmen Shelia Jackson Lee and Keith Ellison are demanding that Obama order U.S. servicemen to get actively and directly involved with the Africans diagnosed with Ebola.

The U.S. has 4 hospitals competent to handle Ebola patients with 2 beds each.
When the American soldiers and NGO healthcare workers return to the U.S. where will they go?

The Obama administration so far has no plan, much like his ISIS response, no plan.

How long does Obama intend to leave our people in West Africa and what will he do to take care of them when they return?

Obama has no idea, no plan. Reacting to a crisis or leaving it to the next president is not leadership.

Question for the Obama liberals: What is the plan? Is there a plan?




You are the gift that keeps on giving. Do you know what these troops will be doing? Did you even bother to check into it? You are one of the people LeglizHemp was talking about in his most recent post. (that probably flew right over your head.)

http://www.armytimes.com/article/20140930/NEWS08/309300063/U-S-troops-head- Africa-Ebola-mission

About 1,400 soldiers will head to Liberia in October to help support the fight against the Ebola virus that is spreading across West Africa, a Pentagon official said Tuesday.

The Army’s 101st Airborne Division (Air Assault), based at Fort Campbell, Kentucky, will provide about 700 of those soldiers, while the other 700 will be mostly combat engineers culled from Army units across the force, Defense Department spokesman Rear Adm. John Kirby told reporters.

The soldiers will be among the total of 3,000 U.S. troops whom the Pentagon plans to send into West Africa this fall.

About 300 of the troops from the 101st Airborne will come from the division headquarters, and they will serve as the Joint Force Command for the mission. They are expected to arrive by the end of October.

“Operation United Assistance is a critical mission,” said Maj. Gen. Gary Volesky, commanding general of the 101st Airborne Division, in a statement. We will coordinate all of the Department of Defense resources in Liberia to support USAID and the government of Liberia to contain the Ebola virus and, ultimately, save lives.”

In addition to the 101st soldiers, elements of four III Corps units have been notified for possible deployment to support the mission in Africa, said Col. Christopher Garver, spokesman for III Corps, in a statement.

They are:

?Multiple headquarters elements and units from the 36th Engineer Brigade at Fort Hood, Texas, and Fort Carson, Colorado.

?An element from the 1st Armored Division Aviation Brigade from Fort Bliss, Texas.

?An element from the 1st Medical Brigade of Fort Hood.

?A small element from the 85th Civil Affairs Brigade, also of Fort Hood.

The U.S. military mission will include building 17 100-bed hospital facilities and a health care facility for infected physicians and health care workers.

U.S. troops will not provide direct care to patients infected with the Ebola virus, according to the Pentagon.

More than 3,000 people have died in the current Ebola epidemic and at least 6,574 have been infected, according to the World Health Organization.

Dr. Steve Monroe, deputy director of the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Disease at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said during a conference call on Tuesday that the outbreak is considered nearly contained in Nigeria and Senegal, which saw just 20 and 1 case, respectively.

But in the most affected nations, including Liberia, where troops are heading, and Sierra Leone, the number of cases are doubling roughly every three weeks, he added.

“The most important thing we can do right now is get cases in isolation so we can stem this outbreak,” Monroe said.

The CDC estimates the disease could affect up to 1.4 million people by January if it’s not contained.

Josh Michaud, associate director of global health policy for the Kaiser Foundation, said more than 300 U.S. government workers are in the affected countries, including 28 employees of the U.S. Agency for International Development, more than 100 CDC workers and roughly 200 military personnel.

Those troops include Army Maj. Gen. Darryl Williams, commander of U.S. Army Africa and Operation United Assistance, as the deployment is being called, and dozens of Navy Seabees who are laying the foundations for construction of the new Ebola care facilities.

When the 101st Airborne Division soldiers deploy, Volesky will take over for Williams, who will return to his duties as commander of U.S. Army Africa.

About 300 soldiers from the division headquarters will deploy to Monrovia, said Lt. Col. Brian DeSantis, the 101st Airborne’s spokesman. The rest of the soldiers will come from the division’s sustainment brigade and the 86th Combat Support Hospital.

The remaining 700 or so soldiers, as announced by Kirby, will come from across the Army.

“It will be very humanitarian-assistance focused,” DeSantis said.

Deploying units will include lift aviation, field hospital assets, transportation soldiers and engineers, he said.

While deployed, the soldiers will be responsible for building some Ebola treatment units and providing logistical support to USAID.

“We also have the responsibility of setting up the training for approximately 500 aid workers per week that will go out and actually staff the [Ebola treatment units],” DeSantis said.

Another priority is force protection, he said.

“We’re making sure all the soldiers who deploy, not just from Fort Campbell but across the Army, get all the training required to protect themselves from Ebola,” he said.

Deploying soldiers should have a “very, very low” risk of contracting Ebola, DeSantis said.

“If anything, there are other health risks we’re more concerned about, and we’ll mitigate those,” he said.

One example is malaria, which is more prevalent in Liberia than Iraq or Afghanistan, he said.

“Protecting the health of our Soldiers is our number one priority,” Volesky said in his statement. “Before our Soldiers deploy they will be trained on how to protect themselves from Ebola and all other potential health risks found in Liberia.”

A DoD spokeswoman said last week the department will make “every effort to ensure that U.S. personnel on the ground and all health care workers” are protected.

Troops will receive regionally specific training on Ebola prevention, malaria prevention and other medical threats and also are required to have immunizations ranging from chickenpox, influenza and hepatitis to yellow fever and pneumococcal vaccines, according to a DoD official.

The department has been involved in research on Ebola treatments and preventives for more than two decades.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said last week the Walter Reed Army Institute of Research received approval to begin safety testing of a potential vaccine.

However, health experts, including Monroe and Sophie Delaunay, executive director of Medecins Sans Frontieres, have cautioned that an effective vaccine is still months from development.

“In the meantime, we need to increase the access to isolation units,” Delaunay said during a web seminar for reporters Tuesday sponsored by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division will form a headquarters element for the 3,000-troop mission that is estimated to last about six months.


2112 - 10/20/2014 at 10:23 PM

Everybody Panic!!!


jkeller - 10/20/2014 at 10:39 PM

quote:
Everybody Panic!!!



I blame Obama for the Kardashians.


LeglizHemp - 10/21/2014 at 12:54 PM

http://www.haaretz.com/news/world/1.621873

Latest updates / Ebola vaccine trials to begin in West Africa in January, WHO says
U.S. issues new wardrobe guidelines for Ebola healthcare workers; Ebola patient released from Atlanta hospital; U.S. CDC calls for better training with protective gear in new Ebola guidelines.
By Haaretz | Oct. 21, 2014 | 2:43 PM

2:43 P.M. Ebola cases rise sharply in western Sierra Leone

The number of people infected with Ebola in western Sierra Leone, on the other side of the country from where the first cases emerged months ago, is soaring with more than 20 deaths daily, the government and local media reported Tuesday.

New confirmed cases of Ebola that emerged Monday in two Ebola zones in and around the capital Freetown numbered 49, the National Ebola Response Center reported Tuesday. There are 851 total confirmed cases in the two zones, called Western Area Urban and Western Area Rural, the center said. But there were no new cases in the eastern districts of Kenema and Kailahun, which previously had been an epicenter of the outbreak. There was no immediate official explanation of what has caused the drop in reported new cases there. (AP)

2:35 P.M. Ebola vaccine trials to begin in West Africa in January, WHO says

A top World Health Organization official says the hunt for an Ebola vaccine will produce data about whether they are safe by December — and they could be in experimental field use by January.

Dr Marie Paule Kieny, an assistant director general for WHO, says clinical trials planned or underway in Europe, Africa and the U.S. are being accompanied by a push among governments for immediate "real-world use" of an approved Ebola vaccine.

She told reporters Tuesday in Geneva that, if the vaccines are deemed safe, tens of thousands of doses would be used in a West African trial in January.

WHO spokeswoman Fadela Chaib also promises a thorough public audit of the agency's early missteps in responding to the Ebola outbreak that has already killed over 4,500 people. (AP)

8:53 A.M. U.S. issues new wardrobe guidelines for Ebola healthcare workers

Federal health officials on Monday issued new guidelines to promote head-to-toe protection for health workers treating Ebola patients.

Officials have been scrambling to come up with new advice since two Dallas nurses became infected while caring for the first person diagnosed with the virus in the United States.

The new guidelines set a firmer standard, calling for full-body garb and hoods that protect worker's necks; setting rigorous rules for removal of equipment and disinfection of gloved hands; and calling for a "site manager" to supervise the putting on and taking off of equipment.

They also say health workers who may be involved in an Ebola patient's care should repeatedly practice and demonstrate proficiency in donning and removing gear — before ever being allowed near a patient.

And they ask hospitals to establish designated areas for putting on and taking off equipment, whether it's a room adjacent to an Ebola patient's room or a hallway area cordoned off with a plastic sheet. (AP)

2:26 A.M. U.S. CDC calls for better training with protective gear in new Ebola guidelines

The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Monday it has set up new guidelines for health workers taking care of patients infected with Ebola that require better training in taking off and putting on protective suits.

The CDC also said that no skin can be exposed by workers taking care of a person infected with Ebola and that supervisors need to monitor workers as they put on protective suits and take them off. (Reuters)

12:44 A.M. Ebola patient released from Atlanta hospital

An Ebola patient who's been treated in Atlanta since early September has been released, hospital officials said Monday.

The man was released Sunday from Atlanta's Emory University Hospital, after he was determined to be free of the virus and no threat to the public.

He was transported to the hospital on September 9 after arriving in Atlanta on a jet. The World Health Organization disclosed that a doctor who had been working in an Ebola treatment center in Sierra Leone had been evacuated out of Africa when he tested positive for the disease.

Emory is one of four U.S. hospitals with specialized treatment units for people with highly dangerous infectious diseases. The others are in Maryland, Nebraska and Montana.

The unidentified patient's time at Emory — nearly six weeks — is perhaps the longest stay of an Ebola patient at a U.S. hospital. None of the seven others was admitted for more than 3 ½ weeks. (AP)


LeglizHemp - 10/21/2014 at 04:00 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/20/health/ebola-travelers-study/index.html?hpt=h p_t2

Up to three Ebola-infected travelers might fly each month
By Jacque Wilson, CNN
updated 11:32 AM EDT, Tue October 21, 2014

(CNN) -- Up to three Ebola-infected travelers might board an international flight each month in West Africa, according to a new study, and potentially spread the deadly virus to other countries.

Scientists used a model to predict that, on average, three people who are infected with Ebola will leave Guinea, Liberia or Sierra Leone in each of the coming months to fly to another country. They based their model on scheduled flights for September 1 to December 31, 2014, historic flight itineraries from 2013, and Ebola surveillance numbers from the current outbreak. The results were published in The Lancet this week.

"We understand there could be global risks associated with the current outbreak," said study author Dr. Isaac Bogoch, a specialist in infectious diseases and tropical medicine at the University of Toronto. "We wanted to understand what those risks were."

Three passengers per month, or 2.8 to be exact, was around what Bogoch was expecting. Considering the number of people living in these West African countries, he says, the prevalence of the disease is still relatively low. Guinea, for example, has around 11.4 million people, and just over 1,500 recorded cases of Ebola.

Nonessential travel to and from these countries has also been reduced significantly over the past six months.

Of the approximately 500,000 travelers who flew out of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone in 2013, more than half flew to one of five countries: Ghana, Senegal, the United Kingdom, France and Gambia. In fact, the study authors say the likelihood of someone traveling to the United Kingdom or France with Ebola is about eight times higher than the likelihood of someone traveling to the United States with the disease.

Of course, Ebola has already come to the United States.

The study authors note that the majority of people flying out of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone are traveling to other low- or middle-income countries. As one hospital in the United States has had some trouble preventing transmission, experts question whether less-equipped nations will be able to stop the virus.

"If you look at how challenged the U.S. has been in dealing with this one imported case, I think it's really important for WHO and other countries to up the preparedness in areas where they might have less resources," said Dr. Jesse Goodman, professor of medicine and infectious diseases at Georgetown University, who was not involved with the study.

The researchers also looked at the effectiveness of airport screenings in stopping the spread of the Ebola virus. Overall, they concluded that exit screening is more effective than screening passengers for Ebola when they arrive in another country. Exit screening at three airports is easier, Bogoch says, and requires fewer resources than doing entry screening at hundreds of airports around the globe.

But even exit screening, he says, is unlikely to have much effect because of the virus' long incubation period.

Someone can be infected with Ebola for up to 21 days before becoming symptomatic. That's how Thomas Eric Duncan made it to the United States with the virus; his temperature was taken before he boarded, but his symptoms didn't start until several days after his flight landed.

Airport screenings are "a control measure, but an imperfect control measure," says Dr. William Schaffner, an expert on infectious diseases at Vanderbilt University.

Schaffner compares it to making fresh-squeezed juice: Airport screenings, from a fundamental public health point of view, he says, are "very much squeeze with very little juice."

The bottom line is that the vast majority of our resources, Bogoch said, should be focused on preventing the spread of infection in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

"If there are fewer cases in West Africa, fewer (infected) people will be boarding planes to other parts of the world," he says. "That said, we still have to be prepared elsewhere. Because we know from experience that it can land on our doorstep."


LeglizHemp - 10/24/2014 at 03:10 AM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/23/health/new-york-possible-ebola-case/index.htm l?hpt=hp_t1

NY doctor recently back from West Africa tests positive for Ebola, officials confirm
By Ray Sanchez and Shimon Prokupecz, CNN
updated 10:27 PM EDT, Thu October 23, 2014

New York (CNN) -- [Breaking news update, posted at 10:20 p.m. ET]
After confirming that tests showed a patient tested positive for Ebola, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said, "We want to state at the outset there is no reason for New Yorkers to be alarmed."

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that authorities are "as ready as one could be for this circumstance." He noted that the situation in his state is different than what happened in Dallas, where a man was diagnosed with Ebola and two health care workers who treated him contracted the virus.

"We had the advantage of learning from the Dallas experience," Cuomo said.

The governor said that it's believed four people came in contact with the person, and authorities are in contact with all four of those people. It is not yet clear whether authorities where counting only those people who came into contact with the man after he became symptomatic.

The Ebola patient finished his work as a doctor in the West African country of Guinea on October 12, left Africa two days later via Europe, and arrived at New York's John F. Kennedy airport on October 17, New York City health commissioner Dr. Mary Travis Bassett said.

He had no symptoms throughout his journey and immediately after arriving in the United States, said Bassett, who added that he checked his temperature twice a day after returning to the United States.

[Previous story, posted at 9:25 p.m. ET]

A Doctors Without Borders physician who recently returned to New York from West Africa has tested positive for the Ebola virus, becoming the first diagnosed case in the city, a law enforcement official briefed on the matter told CNN.

The doctor, identified as Craig Spencer, 33, came back from treating Ebola patients in Guinea about 10 days ago, and developed a fever, nausea, pain and fatigue Wednesday night.

The physician, employed at New York's Columbia Presbyterian Hospital, has been in isolation at Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan since Thursday morning, the official said.

At a news conference Thursday, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio sought to allay public concerns about the spread of the deadly virus, saying that "careful protocols were followed every step of the way" in the city's handling of the case. The hospitalized doctor has "worked closely" with health officials, the mayor said.

The doctor exhibited symptoms of the Ebola virus for "a very brief period of time" and had direct contact with "very few people" in New York, de Blasio told reporters.

On his Facebook page, Spencer posted a photo of himself in protective gear. The page indicates he went to Guinea around September 18 and later to Brussels in mid October.

"Off to Guinea with Doctors Without Borders (MSF)" he wrote. "Please support organizations that are sending support or personnel to West Africa, and help combat one of the worst public health and humanitarian disasters in recent history."

In a statement, Columbia Presbyterian Hospital said the doctor was "a dedicated humanitarian" who went to "an area of medical crisis to help a desperately underserved population."

"He is a committed and responsible physician who always puts his patients first," the hospital statement said. "He has not been to work at our hospital and has not seen any patients at our hospital since his return from overseas."

The CDC had people packing up to go to New York on Thursday, and a specimen from the physician was to be sent to Atlanta for testing, an official familiar with the situation told CNN's Elizabeth Cohen.

Investigators took the case seriously from the outset because it appeared the doctor didn't quarantine himself following his return, the law enforcement official said. The doctor traveled to Brooklyn and then back to Manhattan on Wednesday night, the official said.

In a statement Thursday, Doctors Without Borders confirmed that the physician recently returned from West Africa and was "engaged in regular health monitoring." The doctor contacted Doctors Without Borders Thursday to report a fever, the statement said.

The law enforcement official said the doctor was out in public. Authorities also quarantined his girlfriend, with whom he was spending time since his return from Africa.

The doctor began feeling sluggish a couple of days ago, but it wasn't until Thursday, when he developed 103-degree fever, that he contacted Doctors Without Borders, authorities said.

The case came to light after the New York Fire Department received a call shortly before noon Thursday about a sick person in Manhattan. The patient was taken to Bellevue.

New York's Office of Emergency Management was expected to activate its emergency operations center in Brooklyn, with the focus of tracking down anyone who may have come into contact with Spencer, the law enforcement official tells CNN.

Mark Levine, a city councilman who represents the doctor's Manhattan neighborhood, said earlier Thursday, before news broke of the doctor's positive test, that city health department workers were canvassing the area, distributing information on the disease door-to-door, according to CNN affiliate WABC.
"The goal right now is to make sure people don't panic," he said.

Get up to speed

The health department said a special ambulance unit transported a patient suffering from a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms.

The doctor returned to the U.S. within the past 21 days from one of the three West African countries currently facing the outbreak of virus, the health department statement said.

Bellevue Hospital is designated for the "isolation, identification and treatment of potential Ebola patients" in the city, the statement said.

"As a further precaution, beginning today (Thursday), the Health Department's team of disease detectives immediately began to actively trace all of the patient's contacts to identify anyone who may be at potential risk," the health department statement said.

"The chances of the average New Yorker contracting Ebola are extremely slim," the statement said, adding that the disease is spread by direct contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person.

Bellevue Hospital is one of the eight hospitals statewide that Gov. Andrew Cuomo designated earlier this month as part of an Ebola preparedness plan, the state heath department said.

Ebola has killed nearly 5,000 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea. But fears about its spread has mounted since the first person diagnosed with the disease in the United States was hospitalized in Texas last month.

Thomas Eric Duncan, who had flown from Liberia to Dallas, died on October 8. Two nurses who treated him became infected with the virus and are undergoing treatment, with the cases raising questions about the ability of local and federal officials to deal with an outbreak in the United States.


Muleman1994 - 10/24/2014 at 03:00 PM

It is a good news Friday!

Nina Pham aka: Nurse #1, has been cleared to be discharged from NIH.

No word yet about her dog...


LeglizHemp - 10/25/2014 at 01:02 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/24/health/ebola-nurse/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

What will nurse do after beating Ebola? Hug her dog, of course
By Michael Martinez and Mark Bixler, CNN
updated 4:04 AM EDT, Sat October 25, 2014

(CNN) -- Nina Pham was the first person to catch Ebola on U.S. soil, and now, 13 days after testing positive, she has been declared free of the deadly disease.

Her first order of business will be to hug her dog, Bentley, she said Friday.

She invoked God and science in expressing gratitude for her ongoing recovery from a disease that has no established cure.

"I feel fortunate and blessed to be standing here today," she said. "Throughout this ordeal, I have put my faith in God and my medical team."

Later Friday, President Barack Obama met Pham in the Oval Office and gave her a big hug.

Prayer sustained her, and she thanked people around the world who prayed for her, Pham told reporters Friday at a National Institutes of Health hospital in Bethesda, Maryland.

The nation saw a cheerful and composed Pham, dressed in a bright turquoise top and matching necklace, when she strode to a bank of microphones moments after Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, said she was free of the virus.

Complete coverage of Ebola

She thanked Dr. Kent Brantly, the American physician who also survived Ebola, for donating his plasma to her while she was sick.

But she's not entirely out of the woods, she said.

"Although I no longer have Ebola, I know that it may be awhile before I have my strength back," Pham said. "So with gratitude and respect for everyone's concern, I ask for my privacy and for my family's privacy to be respected as I return to Texas and try to get back to a normal life and reunite with my dog, Bentley."

Bentley, a Cavalier King Charles spaniel, remains in quarantine until the end of the month in Texas, but Pham "will be able to visit, hold and play with him tomorrow," Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins said Friday.

"I know that will be good for both of them," said Jenkins, who oversees the Ebola response in Dallas.

A 'stressful and challenging' time

Pham, 26, who grew up in a Vietnamese family in Fort Worth, Texas, graduated with a nursing degree in 2010 and just months ago received a certification in critical care nursing, which deals with life-threatening problems.

The Ebola experience, she said, was a "very stressful and challenging" time for her.

Without direct reference to the continent, she alluded to how Ebola has ravaged West Africa in an unprecedented outbreak that the World Health Organization says has caused almost 10,000 confirmed or probable cases of infection and 4,877 deaths as of this week.

"I am on my way back to recovery even as I reflect on how many others have not been so fortunate," she said.

White House press secretary Josh Earnest called Pham's case "a pretty apt reminder that we do have the best medical infrastructure in the world."

"The track record of treating Ebola patients in this country is very strong, particularly for those who are quickly diagnosed," Earnest said. "The fact that she has been treated and released I think is terrific news."

The first to catch virus on U.S. soil

Can pets get or spread Ebola?

Pham was among the doctors and nurses in Dallas who treated Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person to be diagnosed with Ebola in the United States. His diagnosis came after he returned from a trip to West Africa, and he died on October 8.

Three days later, Pham tested positive for the Ebola virus, becoming the first person in the United States to contract Ebola on American soil. That sent waves of anxiety through the network of health care workers -- and beyond.

Latest Ebola developments

Those anxieties deepened on October 15 when a second nurse in Dallas, Amber Vinson, tested positive for Ebola. Vinson had flown from Dallas to Cleveland and back, prompting an airline to warn passengers on both legs of her trip as well as passengers who took subsequent flights on an aircraft she used. Some schools closed. Health departments monitored dozens of people.

None of them has tested positive for Ebola.

Pham said Friday that her thoughts are with Vinson, who is getting treatment for Ebola at Atlanta's Emory University Hospital.

Vinson is steadily regaining her strength, and her spirits are high, her family has said. Doctors can no longer detect the virus in her body, but they have not yet determined when she will be discharged, the hospital in Atlanta said Friday.


gina - 10/25/2014 at 03:39 PM

I was not aware of what has been done in NY regarding Ebola, but now I am and it is quite scary. Of course the major metropolitan hospitals have to be able to screen, assess and diagnose someone propertly. But they have been good at that with any other type of disease, but now our Governor here in NY has declared EIGHT hospitals as treatment centers. In the entire US, there are only four bio containment centers. A biocontainment center is a place with the specialized facility to quarantine, isolate a patient sufficiently enough to prevent anyone else from catching the disease they have.

FOUR containment centers in the entire country, but now New York will have eight just here. North Shore Hospital is building a special containment unit in Glen Cove, separate from the rest of their hospital. The other one on Long island as a designated center is Stony Brook.

Bellevue in NYC is good because they have four isolation rooms within their Infectious Disease ward and they have a laboratory located within that ward so that the samples do not travel anywhere else in the hospital. The Dr.'s and nurses who treat patients there wear special protective clothing so that no part of their skin anywhere on their body is exposed. They wear helmets, not just surgical masks, gowns and gloves. For anyone transported to the hospital, their protective clothing is removed from them by someone else cutting the infection control clothing off the person from behind. They cannot even remove their own gowns etc. The disease is too dangerous.

http://www.governor.ny.gov/press/10162014-ebola-preparedness-plan

http://finance.yahoo.com/news/address-future-infectious-disease-outbreaks-1 42947845.html;_ylt=A0LEV1.6FEtUk2cAfDBXNyoA

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/10/15/creating-regional-ebol a-hospitals/17321161/

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/10/24/new-york-new-jersey-set-up-mandatory -quarantine-requirement-amid-ebola-threat/

Indeed, in discussing the new plan, Cuomo and Christie said a policy of voluntary quarantine simply does not go far enough. “Voluntary quarantine – you know it’s almost an oxymoron. This is a very serious situation,” Cuomo said. “Voluntary quarantine – raise your right hand and promise you’re going to stay home for 21 days. We’ve seen what happens.”

At the airports, they now take the temperatures of incoming travelers if they have been to one of these countries. In the Governor's press conference one of the authorities there with him noted that no planes come directly from Africa to JFK, they come thru Brussells, Belgium, and Paris, France first.

Someone else asked if the US would close their borders to protect people, the answer was no, because they don't want sick people wandering around infecting people, this way, they have to come thru the airport, can be screened there and then whisked off to a screening and containment center if necessary.

8 out of 12 nationwide bio-containment centers in NYC and Long Island.




LeglizHemp - 10/25/2014 at 04:24 PM

NYC likes to go big when something happens or could happen. Look at how the city changed after 911, the surveillance systems they put in place are some of the best in the world, so good they haven't really had to be used to their full potential.


LeglizHemp - 10/25/2014 at 04:42 PM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lAz-F1QnyCk

The difference between US vs UK Ebola news coverage
Russell Howard's Good News

Published on Oct 24, 2014
Russell Howard looks at the extreme difference in coverage of Ebola in the UK and USA.


LeglizHemp - 10/25/2014 at 11:17 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/25/health/us-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t1

Quarantined nurse: New Ebola policy in N.J., N.Y. an 'ordeal'
By Ray Sanchez and Elizabeth Cohen, CNN
updated 6:29 PM EDT, Sat October 25, 2014

New York (CNN) -- A mandatory 21-day quarantine imposed by New York and New Jersey on health care workers returning from West Africa caught local and federal officials by surprise and spurred a heated debate on handling the spread of Ebola without cutting the flow of medical aid to the hardest-hit West African countries.

The policy of isolating medical personnel and others arriving from Ebola-affected countries zones was abruptly implemented Friday by the governors of New York and New Jersey, Andrew Cuomo and Chris Christie. The announcement came one day after a New York doctor who treated patients in Guinea became the first Ebola case diagnosed in the city and the fourth in the United States.

The mandate came as a surprise to the federal Centers for Disease and Control and Prevention in Atlanta, according to a federal official familiar with the situation.

"They're not happy," the official said of the CDC. "These two governors said, 'Take this, federal government.' They're very worried we won't be able to get physicians or nurses to go (to countries affected by the Ebola outbreak)."

A New York City official called more stringent screening "a real stunner."

Quarantined nurse slams travel policy

"They did this without consulting the city, and that's not a good thing," the official said of Cuomo and Christie. "They didn't let anyone know in advance."

On Saturday, the CDC said that it sets the baseline recommended standards, but state and local officials have the prerogative to set tighter policies.

"When it comes to the federal standards set by the CDC, we will consider any measures that we believe have the potential to make the American people safer," the CDC said in a statement.

Nurse worried about mandatory quarantines

The two-state policy was implemented the same day that nurse Kaci Hickox landed at Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey after working with Doctors Without Borders in treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone.

Hickox, in an Op-Ed piece in The Dallas Morning News, wrote that she was ordered placed in quarantine at a hospital, where she tested negative in a preliminary test for Ebola. Still, hospital officials told her she must remain under mandatory quarantine for 21 days.

Hickox wrote that she was held at the airport and questioned by various health workers after her flight landed about 1 p.m. At first, her temperature -- taken with forehead scanner -- was 98 degrees. Hour later, she wrote, she was upset at being held without explanation. Her cheeks were flushed. Another scanner check recorded her temperature as 101 degrees.

She eventually got a police escort, sirens blaring, to a hospital, when her temperature was again checked in an outdoor tent. On the oral thermometer, her temperature was recorded as 98.6. And she tested negative for Ebola, she wrote in the Dallas newspaper.

"I had spent a month watching children die, alone," she wrote. "I had witnessed human tragedy unfold before my eyes. I had tried to help when much of the world has looked on and done nothing... I sat alone in the isolation tent and thought of many colleagues who will return home to America and face the same ordeal. Will they be made to feel like criminals and prisoners?"

New Jersey health officials confirmed Saturday that a preliminary test showed that she does not have Ebola. But she will remain in quarantine at a hospital in Newark for at least 21 days under the new policy.

Hickox wrote about her last night in Sierra Leone. She recalled watching a 10-year-old girl die in a tent, away from her family.

"With few resources and no treatment for Ebola, we tried to offer our patients dignity and humanity in the face of their immense suffering," Hickox wrote. "We need more health care workers to help fight the epidemic in West Africa. The U.S. must treat returning health care workers with dignity and humanity."

New York City Health Commissioner Dr. Mary Bassett is concerned that the mandatory quarantine will discourage doctors and nurses from volunteering to take care of Ebola patients in West Africa, according to her spokeswoman.

"We just want to make sure we don't inadvertently discourage volunteers who are going to West Africa to help control this epidemic,"said health department spokeswoman Jean Weinberg.

The New York-New Jersey airport screening procedures now require anyone who had direct contact with Ebola patients to remain in quarantine for up to three weeks.

In addition, people with a travel history to the affected regions but with no direct contact with Ebola patients will be "actively monitored ... and, if necessary, quarantined," according to the new policy.

"This is not the time to take chances," Cuomo said Friday. "This adjustment in increasing the screening procedures is necessary. ... I think public safety and public health have to be balanced and I think this policy does that."

New federal policy starts Monday

The new guidelines in New York and New Jersey add to the federal policy requiring all travelers coming to the United States from Ebola-affected areas to be actively monitored for 21 days, starting Monday.

Already, such travelers landing at five U.S. airports -- New York's Kennedy, Dulles International, New Jersey's Newark Liberty International, Chicago's O'Hare International and Hartsfield-Jackson International in Atlanta -- must go through enhanced screening.

Ebola has killed nearly 5,000 people, mostly in Liberia, Sierra Leone and Guinea, in what health officials call the worst outbreak of the disease in history.

Just four Americans -- all health care workers -- have contracted Ebola.

On Friday, the National Institutes of Health said Nina Pham, a Dallas nurse, had been declared free of the Ebola virus.

Public health experts say there's plenty of scientific evidence indicating that there's very little chance that a random person will get Ebola, unless he or she is in very close contact -- close enough to share bodily fluids -- with someone who has it.

How the Ebola virus spreads

New York Ebola patient in isolation

On Thursday, a New York doctor who had traveled on a humanitarian mission to Guinea, where he had treated Ebola patients, developed symptoms and has been hospitalized in Manhattan. Dr. Craig Spencer, 33, is in isolation at Bellevue Hospital. He arrived back from Guinea on October 17 and had limited his public interactions but did not eliminate them, according to officials.

Spencer's fiancee, who has been under quarantine at Bellevue, has been cleared and has no symptoms, according to Jean Weinberg, a city health department spokeswoman. Two friends of Spencer are under quarantine outside the hospital and are being monitored, though they feel healthy.

Spencer's activities, which include riding in subways and cabs, have sparked a sharp public debate about how to deal with people who have traveled to West African countries ravaged by the disease.

On Saturday, one of the places visited by the Spencer, The Gutter bowling alley in Brooklyn, reopened after extensive decontamination work. And New York Mayor Bill de Blasio dined on meatballs at a Manhattan restaurant visited by the doctor.

Should the focus of American policy be to do everything to prevent anyone who has visited the most ravaged regions from entering the United States, even if it discourages health care workers from going there?

Some U.S. lawmakers, such as Rep. Andy Harris, favor a strict three-week quarantine. (That duration is significant because it takes anywhere from two to 21 days from the time a person is exposed to Ebola to when he or she shows symptoms of it; if more time than that passes without symptoms, a person is considered Ebola-free.)

"In return from being allowed to come back into the country from a place where a deadly disease is endemic, you'd have to enter a quarantine facility and be supervised for 21 days," the Maryland Republican told CNN.

But other officials say while that policy could prevent some cases of Ebola in the United States over the short term, it could backfire if highly trained American doctors have less incentive to travel to Africa to fight the disease.

"These individuals who are going there to serve are the people who will end this crisis," de Blasio said. "We can't have the illusion that we can turn away from it and some day it may end. If we took that attitude, this would be a truly devastating global crisis."

Complete coverage on Ebola

CNN's Joe Sutton, Daniel Burke, Greg Botelho, Dr. Sanjay Gupta, Poppy Harlow, Haimy Assefa, Kristina Sgueglia and David Shortell contributed to this report.


LeglizHemp - 10/26/2014 at 11:00 AM

OK OK.......I am personally heading to NYC to check out the situation personally


gina - 10/26/2014 at 03:41 PM

A nurse who treated patients in Sierra Leone flew back to JFK and tells what happened to her.

http://www.dallasnews.com/ebola/headlines/20141025-uta-grad-isolated-at-new -jersey-hospital-as-part-of-ebola-quarantine.ece

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/26/nyregion/nurse-in-newark-tests-negative-f or-ebola.html?action=click&contentCollection=Middle%20East&region=F ooter&module=TopNews&pgtype=article

The forehead temperature scanner used at the airport said her temperature was 101 degrees, when in fact her temperature was 98.6. After travelling 2 days on planes, she gets interrogated, for 7 hours, is given a granola bar and water, then sent for quarantine to a hospital in Newark.




Muleman1994 - 10/26/2014 at 06:46 PM

quote:
A nurse who treated patients in Sierra Leone flew back to JFK and tells what happened to her.

http://www.dallasnews.com/ebola/headlines/20141025-uta-grad-isolated-at-new -jersey-hospital-as-part-of-ebola-quarantine.ece

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/10/26/nyregion/nurse-in-newark-tests-negative-f or-ebola.html?action=click&contentCollection=Middle%20East®ion=Footer&a mp;module=TopNews&pgtype=article

The forehead temperature scanner used at the airport said her temperature was 101 degrees, when in fact her temperature was 98.6. After travelling 2 days on planes, she gets interrogated, for 7 hours, is given a granola bar and water, then sent for quarantine to a hospital in Newark.






________________________________________________

Anyone sent to Newark should sue!


emr - 10/26/2014 at 11:33 PM

Kudos to Cuomo and Christie for having the balls Obama and the CDC lack. Admirable that she volunteered; but f-u you go into quarantine. So what if she has no symptoms? It takes 21 days to be clear and this is how we protect our citizens from getting sick.


LeglizHemp - 10/27/2014 at 04:48 PM

so far no sign of ebola. i am working dilegently checking every bar i see. i will keep you posted.


gondicar - 10/27/2014 at 05:01 PM

quote:
Kudos to Cuomo and Christie for having the balls Obama and the CDC lack. Admirable that she volunteered; but f-u you go into quarantine. So what if she has no symptoms? It takes 21 days to be clear and this is how we protect our citizens from getting sick.

Quarantine or not, based on her account she was not treated with any dignity whatsoever and made to feel like a drug smuggler or potential terrorist. That is not right. What's worse it that it could discourage others from volunteering and if the end result of the reaction/overreaction at home is to discourage others from volunteering on the front lines of this fight, then I'm afraid it is just a matter of time before the fight will be lost.


emr - 10/27/2014 at 05:10 PM

quote:
quote:
Kudos to Cuomo and Christie for having the balls Obama and the CDC lack. Admirable that she volunteered; but f-u you go into quarantine. So what if she has no symptoms? It takes 21 days to be clear and this is how we protect our citizens from getting sick.

Quarantine or not, based on her account she was not treated with any dignity whatsoever and made to feel like a drug smuggler or potential terrorist. That is not right. What's worse it that it could discourage others from volunteering and if the end result of the reaction/overreaction at home is to discourage others from volunteering on the front lines of this fight, then I'm afraid it is just a matter of time before the fight will be lost.


I usually tend to agree with you; but she was treated as someone under quarantine. I just don't see "self" quarantine as a viable option; and I think our governments first responsibility is to protect its citizens. Our global responsibility comes after.


gondicar - 10/27/2014 at 05:17 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Kudos to Cuomo and Christie for having the balls Obama and the CDC lack. Admirable that she volunteered; but f-u you go into quarantine. So what if she has no symptoms? It takes 21 days to be clear and this is how we protect our citizens from getting sick.

Quarantine or not, based on her account she was not treated with any dignity whatsoever and made to feel like a drug smuggler or potential terrorist. That is not right. What's worse it that it could discourage others from volunteering and if the end result of the reaction/overreaction at home is to discourage others from volunteering on the front lines of this fight, then I'm afraid it is just a matter of time before the fight will be lost.


I usually tend to agree with you; but she was treated as someone under quarantine. I just don't see "self" quarantine as a viable option; and I think our governments first responsibility is to protect its citizens. Our global responsibility comes after.


What does "treated as someone under quarantine" mean exactly? Does it mean treated like a dog?

[Edited on 10/27/2014 by gondicar]


emr - 10/27/2014 at 06:21 PM

It should mean kept in isolation (equivalent to a low level medical settig) for 21 days till the incubation period is over. I think it is unclear whether she was treated poorly or was just pissd off that she was being isolated


tbomike - 10/27/2014 at 07:04 PM

Actually I think it is quite clear that she was treated poorly and Christie and Cuomo are a pair of boobs.


emr - 10/27/2014 at 07:40 PM

Not as booby as the Obama spokesperson who said there was no medical reason for quarantining people without a proven infection. We have no mechanism to determine if the virus is contagious in the day or two before fever/etc starts. We haven't tracked the people.

Don't know how old you guys are but the Appoll 11 Astronauts were quarantined when returning from the moon just in case.

And what exactly do you have to prove her mistreatment other than her statement that I was mistreated?


gondicar - 10/27/2014 at 08:07 PM

quote:
Not as booby as the Obama spokesperson who said there was no medical reason for quarantining people without a proven infection. We have no mechanism to determine if the virus is contagious in the day or two before fever/etc starts. We haven't tracked the people.

Everything I have read, with no dissent from any medical authority that I have seen, is that it is not contagious unless a person symptomatic. You are the first person I have seen say that is not the case, and you did not post any links to support what you are saying.

quote:
Don't know how old you guys are but the Appoll 11 Astronauts were quarantined when returning from the moon just in case.

What does this have to do with ebola? Not even apples and oranges, more like apples and dump trucks.

quote:
And what exactly do you have to prove her mistreatment other than her statement that I was mistreated?

Thanks for making my point...this is something that we would say about a suspect in a crime, not someone who went into the hot zone to try to make a difference on humanitarian grounds. Why should we not believe her?


Muleman1994 - 10/27/2014 at 09:20 PM

Is Obama waiting for his political handlers to tell him what to do (again)?

Fog of Ebola war: White House stance unclear as military leaders urge US troop quarantine

Published October 27, 2014 - FoxNews.com

The White House would not say Monday whether President Obama thinks U.S. troops returning from the Ebola hot zone in West Africa should be quarantined, as the U.S. Army unilaterally imposed that policy on its own troops and the Joint Chiefs of Staff recommended the rest of the military follow suit.

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel currently is considering the Joint Chiefs' recommendation to impose a mandatory 21-day quarantine for all returning troops. At Monday's daily briefing, White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest acknowledged that Hagel might coordinate with the White House on that decision.

But when pressed by Fox News on what the president's position is, Earnest would not say.
"We will let the Department of Defense make an announcement," Earnest said. Asked how the U.S. could send troops to West Africa without a clear plan on procedures for leaving the Ebola battlefield, Earnest said: "We're going to let science drive that process."

The comments reflected the latest area of confusion in the ever-evolving U.S. response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Over the weekend, the White House put pressure on New Jersey and New York over policies quarantining returning health care workers. But it remains unclear where the White House -- and Hagel himself -- stands on applying that standard to returning U.S. servicemembers.

So far, the Army is the only branch to take that step. In a decision Fox News confirms was made by Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno, the Department of the Army has issued guidelines ordering troops returning from West Africa into a 21-day isolation, separated from their families and other troops.

Currently, a team that consists of Maj. Gen. Darryl A. Williams and 11 other troops is being held in isolation in a building at their base in Vicenza, Italy, after returning from Liberia.

"There are several dozen more people due in, and they will go through the same procedure," Pentagon spokesman Col. Steve Warren said, adding that "no specific event or incident" triggered the policy.

Asked if Hagel thought the Army's decision was a good idea, Warren said "he would have to get back" to Fox News on the question.

The secretary is deliberating, and no final decision has been made. "Secretary Hagel has a big problem," one senior U.S. official told Fox News, referring to the decision he has to make.
If the Pentagon does decide on a 21-day quarantine for all returning personnel, it would represent a major shift in its Ebola response policy. And it could put them at odds with the White House.

"The Obama administration is going to war with New York and New Jersey, but its own military is recommending the same thing," a senior U.S. official told Fox News.

Earnest stressed Monday that the Defense Department's policy for all branches has "not been settled and implemented yet."

He also drew a distinction with the policies implemented in New York and New Jersey, noting that they singled out health workers.

Earnest said the administration wants to make sure that government policies "do not serve as a disincentive" to doctors and nurses.

The current military plan, outside the Army, is only to quarantine those individuals who may come in contact with infected patients.

Defense Department officials have made clear that no personnel are going to be treating infected patients and that the vast majority of the troops in Liberia are logistical experts who are establishing the medical infrastructure for health care workers outside the Department of Defense.

But a growing number of U.S. military personnel are being deployed, and would be affected by any blanket quarantine order. As of Friday, 686 U.S. troops were in West Africa as part of that mission, with hundreds more expected to have arrived over the weekend.

If Hagel accepts the recommendation from the Joint Chiefs, it would put the Defense Department in line with New York and New Jersey, which have faced the ire of the White House for such mandatory quarantine policies for returning health workers.

Amid that pressure, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie's administration on Monday said a health care worker quarantined after she returned from Sierra Leone -- and who threatened a lawsuit -- has been cleared to go home.

The state Department of Health said the patient, Kaci Hickox, has been symptom-free for 24 hours, and "is being discharged" after being evaluated in coordination with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The health department said Monday that the patient was subject to quarantine at first because she had direct exposure to people suffering from Ebola in West Africa. At this point, though, she has requested to return to Maine, and the state says that will be arranged "via a private carrier."

"She will remain subject to New Jersey's mandatory quarantine order while in New Jersey," the department said. "Health officials in Maine have been notified of her arrangements and will make a determination under their own laws on her treatment when she arrives."

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo also announced late Sunday he had loosened some of the restrictions in the mandatory 21-day Ebola quarantine he had ordered along with Christie this past Friday

Under the new guidelines, health workers who have had contact with Ebola patients will be quarantined at home and receive twice-daily monitoring if they have no symptoms. Family members will be allowed to stay. The state will pay for any lost compensation, if they are not paid by a volunteer organization.

Meanwhile, in New York a 5-year-old boy returning from West Africa reportedly was taken to a local hospital Sunday with possible Ebola symptoms. He was reported to have a 103-degree fever.

Earlier Sunday, the White House expressed concern about what it called the "unintended consequences" of the mandatory quarantine, telling Fox News that the Obama administration is working on new federal guidelines on returning health care workers exposed to Ebola, realizing the concern among Americans about a potential outbreak on U.S. soil.

Virginia also will start actively monitoring travelers from the three West African countries. Last week, Connecticut quarantined a family of six, along with three others. The family of six was quarantined after TSA flagged them due to their travel to West Africa.

Fox News' Justin Fishel, Jennifer Griffin and Ed Henry contributed to this report.


emr - 10/27/2014 at 09:27 PM

quote:
quote:
Not as booby as the Obama spokesperson who said there was no medical reason for quarantining people without a proven infection. We have no mechanism to determine if the virus is contagious in the day or two before fever/etc starts. We haven't tracked the people.

Everything I have read, with no dissent from any medical authority that I have seen, is that it is not contagious unless a person symptomatic. You are the first person I have seen say that is not the case, and you did not post any links to support what you are saying.

quote:
Don't know how old you guys are but the Appoll 11 Astronauts were quarantined when returning from the moon just in case.

What does this have to do with ebola? Not even apples and oranges, more like apples and dump trucks.

quote:
And what exactly do you have to prove her mistreatment other than her statement that I was mistreated?

Thanks for making my point...this is something that we would say about a suspect in a crime, not someone who went into the hot zone to try to make a difference on humanitarian grounds. Why should we not believe her?


1 - If you've ever had a cold you know that often times in retrospect that you say "I didn't feel right yesterday." Same thing here - the exact moment when one is "symptomatic" "contagious" with anything is often a hindsight thing. It is when I'm sick.

2 - The fact that she was a humanitarian volunteer ; again; does not make her judgment re: her treatment legion. The next time I tell my wife she's not treating me well and she says that's not true please come to my house and tell her "what reason do we have to doubt him." She obviously was saying I can monitor myself very well thank you; and even if that was true not everyone can be trusted.

3 - re: moon the point is when there is uncertainty and possible public health risk I just like to err on the side of public safety. Again; I worked at St. Vincent's at the start of the AID's epidemic. If you only knew the number of gay men who when warned of their contagion said "I got it in the bath houses and I'm going back there to leave it." Not everyone is as upstanding (and I mean that seriously having read your posts over the years) as you.


gondicar - 10/27/2014 at 10:00 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
Not as booby as the Obama spokesperson who said there was no medical reason for quarantining people without a proven infection. We have no mechanism to determine if the virus is contagious in the day or two before fever/etc starts. We haven't tracked the people.

Everything I have read, with no dissent from any medical authority that I have seen, is that it is not contagious unless a person symptomatic. You are the first person I have seen say that is not the case, and you did not post any links to support what you are saying.

quote:
Don't know how old you guys are but the Appoll 11 Astronauts were quarantined when returning from the moon just in case.

What does this have to do with ebola? Not even apples and oranges, more like apples and dump trucks.

quote:
And what exactly do you have to prove her mistreatment other than her statement that I was mistreated?

Thanks for making my point...this is something that we would say about a suspect in a crime, not someone who went into the hot zone to try to make a difference on humanitarian grounds. Why should we not believe her?


1 - If you've ever had a cold you know that often times in retrospect that you say "I didn't feel right yesterday." Same thing here - the exact moment when one is "symptomatic" "contagious" with anything is often a hindsight thing. It is when I'm sick.

2 - The fact that she was a humanitarian volunteer ; again; does not make her judgment re: her treatment legion. The next time I tell my wife she's not treating me well and she says that's not true please come to my house and tell her "what reason do we have to doubt him." She obviously was saying I can monitor myself very well thank you; and even if that was true not everyone can be trusted.

3 - re: moon the point is when there is uncertainty and possible public health risk I just like to err on the side of public safety. Again; I worked at St. Vincent's at the start of the AID's epidemic. If you only knew the number of gay men who when warned of their contagion said "I got it in the bath houses and I'm going back there to leave it." Not everyone is as upstanding (and I mean that seriously having read your posts over the years) as you.


1. Is this the opinion of a medial professional based on medical training? If not, it is useless information.

2. That is a silly analogy. There is nothing about her statements about how she was treated that lead me to believe she should not be believed or that she was "obviously" meaning something else.

3. The moon analogy doesn't work for me on so many levels that it is tough to know where to start. But I get your point. I am not saying that quarantine is a bad idea, I am saying it should be done in a more dignified and humanitarian way than it was done in this case. If the quarantine's continue, I sincerely hope they figure that out.


Muleman1994 - 10/28/2014 at 05:27 PM

Even more good news !

Nurse #2 from the Dallas Hospital and sent to Emory Hospital in Atlanta is going home today.

BTW - Antone heard from Obama's Ebola Czar? Seems to be missing in action similar to Obama's Ebola response...


gina - 10/30/2014 at 04:47 PM

NY recently revised the quarantine rules for those who showed no symptoms but had to be quarantined anyway just for public safety sake. They agreed to let those quarantined stay at home for the 21 days,. Now we hear that the nurse who was allowed to remain under home quarantine, has challenged her quarantine by going out twice. (though she is staying in Maine)

http://news.yahoo.com/showdown-imminent-over-nurses-quarantine-maine-060038 440.html

Nurse Kaci Hickox went out on a bike ride Thursday in defiance of the state's voluntary quarantine for medical workers who have treated Ebola patients. It was the second time in two days that she left her home in remote northern Maine, along the Canadian border. On Wednesday evening, Hickox came out and briefly spoke to reporters, even shaking a hand that was offered to her.

"I'm not willing to stand here and let my civil rights be violated when it's not science-based," she said Wednesday evening.

Remarks: A Nurse ought to know better. She has no symptoms, but symptoms can come out at a later time, which is the reason for the quarantine. If we are going to have these showdowns, then then the solutions are:

1) Mandatory quarantine under the auspices of health officials wherever they set up the facility (even if it is in a FEMA camp)

2) Stop sending/allowing US citizens to go to countries with people that have deadly disease. Let the other African nations, which do have cities and health care wokers send their own people in, and leave us out of it.

3) Refuse exit/entry visas for health care workers to these countries.

4) Limit Compassionate care and humanitarian aid to sending medicine and supplies for the doctors, nurses from other countries to via cargo containers unloaded at ports of call. Let them send in their own people.

We do not need to live in a police state, or have epidemics,pandemics here. The above suggestions will prevent it.

[Edited on 10/30/2014 by gina]


gondicar - 10/30/2014 at 05:03 PM

quote:
Remarks: A Nurse ought to know better. She has no symptoms, but symptoms can come out at a later time, which is the reason for the quarantine.

She should know better than who exactly? The know-nothing politicians who are implementing these quarantines, or the health care professionals with actual medical training (like her) who dispute that there is a medical or public safety necessity for how they are being implemented, or the reporters and media types who are camped out in front of her home and seem to have no problem interacting with her and even [gasp!] shaking her hand?

It is sad and sickening to watch how she is being vilified unmercifully by people who have no clue what they are talking about because their fears are being stoked by politicians who have chosen to throw the constitution to the wind and succumb to all the unnecessary hysteria.

quote:
The above suggestions will prevent it.

Actually, the above suggestions would move us a few steps closer to a police state and violate the most basic tenants of what this country is about, not to mention destroying liberties provided by that little document called the Constitution of the United States of America.



[Edited on 10/30/2014 by gondicar]


gina - 10/30/2014 at 06:34 PM

quote:
quote:
Remarks: A Nurse ought to know better. She has no symptoms, but symptoms can come out at a later time, which is the reason for the quarantine.

She should know better than who exactly? The know-nothing politicians who are implementing these quarantines, or the health care professionals with actual medical training (like her) who dispute that there is a medical or public safety necessity for how they are being implemented, or the reporters and media types who are camped out in front of her home and seem to have no problem interacting with her and even [gasp!] shaking her hand?

It is sad and sickening to watch how she is being vilified unmercifully by people who have no clue what they are talking about because their fears are being stoked by politicians who have chosen to throw the constitution to the wind and succumb to all the unnecessary hysteria.

quote:
The above suggestions will prevent it.

Actually, the above suggestions would move us a few steps closer to a police state and violate the most basic tenants of what this country is about, not to mention destroying liberties provided by that little document called the Constitution of the United States of America.


[Edited on 10/30/2014 by gondicar]


A nurse is trained in infection control, they know more about how disease spreads, and the dangers than other people who are not health care professionals. For disease to enter someone's body, you need the disease, and a portal of entry. The entry can be dry, cracked skin. In this case the nurse does not think she has it, otherwise she would not be shaking anybody's hand. If she thought there was the possibility that she was infected, she would stay in the house. Unfortunately, if she is wrong, she has risked other people's lives. That is the purpose of quarantine to prevent that.


gondicar - 10/30/2014 at 07:28 PM

quote:
A nurse is trained in infection control, they know more about how disease spreads, and the dangers than other people who are not health care professionals.

You should have stopped right here.


emr - 10/30/2014 at 08:03 PM

quote:
quote:
A nurse is trained in infection control, they know more about how disease spreads, and the dangers than other people who are not health care professionals.

You should have stopped right here.



The bottom line is that there is a 21 day incubation period; which means that any time up to 21 days she could get sick; and around the time she gets sick she is potentially infectious. There is a small but real risk; and this is a very contagious disease with severe consequences. I think the small risk outweighs the benefits; many health care providers do to - and I am a physician. There is no 100% certainty - and you choose your side based on how you view risk/benefit balancing.

But that nurse is a jerk - said she'd self quarantine and now says f-u. The gov't keeps responding that this will dissuade people from volunteering; but they never say there is no chance of infection. It is small; it is real. How small is not 100% certain


gondicar - 10/31/2014 at 06:28 PM

Thank goodness that rational thinking, not to mention respect for the US Constitution, wins out over fear and hysteria...

FORT KENT, Maine —Kaci Hickox is free to travel unrestricted after a Maine judge on Friday rejected the state's bid to limit her movements as a medical worker who has treated Ebola patients.

Judge Charles C. LaVerdiere ruled Hickox must continue daily monitoring and coordinate travel with state health officials to ensure continuity of monitoring. The judge said there's no need to restrict her movements because she's not infectious because she's showing no symptoms.

With the judge's ruling, a state police cruiser parked outside her home drove away.

The state went to court Thursday to impose restrictions on Hickox until the 21-day incubation period for Ebola ends on Nov. 10. Hickox, who treated Ebola patients in Sierra Leone, contended confinement at her home in northern Maine violated her rights.

There was no immediate comment from state officials.

The judge thanked Hickox for her service in Africa and acknowledged the gravity of restricting someone's constitutional rights without solid science to back it up.

"The court is fully aware of the misconceptions, misinformation, bad science and bad information being spread from shore to shore in our country with respect to Ebola," he wrote. "The court is fully aware that people are acting out of fear and that this fear is not entirely rational."

Hickox, 33, stepped into the media glare when she returned from treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone to become subject to a mandatory quarantine in New Jersey. After being released from a hospital there, she returned to this small town, where she was placed under what Maine authorities called a voluntary quarantine.

She said she is following the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation of daily monitoring for fever and other signs of the disease.

"I'm not willing to stand here and let my civil rights be violated when it's not science-based," she said earlier in the week.

The legal action is shaping up as the nation's biggest test case yet in the struggle to balance public health and fear of Ebola against personal freedom.

In a court filing, the director of the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention backed away from the state's original request for an in-home quarantine and called for restrictions that fall in line with federal guidelines.

Hickox remains at risk of being infected with Ebola until the end of a 21-day incubation period, Dr. Sheila Pinette.

"It is my opinion that the respondent should be subjected to an appropriate public health order for mandatory direct active monitoring and restrictions on movement as soon as possible and until the end of the incubation period ... to protect the public health and safety," she wrote.

http://www.wcvb.com/news/life-goes-on-for-nurse-in-standoff-over-ebola/2945 1340

[Edited on 10/31/2014 by gondicar]


LeglizHemp - 10/31/2014 at 07:20 PM

well the death toll continues to double every 30 days still but it looks like the survival rate is increasing. the next 30 days, it will be interesting to see if the infection rate starts declining

http://www.thestar.com.my/News/World/2014/11/01/Ebola-death-toll-rises-fewe r-cases-in-Guinea-than-thought--WHO/

Published: Saturday November 1, 2014 MYT 2:45:06 AM
Updated: Saturday November 1, 2014 MYT 2:45:06 AM

Ebola death toll rises, fewer cases in Guinea than thought - WHO

GENEVA (Reuters) - The Ebola epidemic has killed 4,951 people out of 13,567 infected in eight countries, the World Health Organisation said on Friday, slightly revising downwards its figures for cases mainly due to "suspected cases in Guinea being discarded".

The toll reflects a rise of 31 deaths since the United Nations agency reported its previous figures on Wednesday, while the number of overall cases fell by 136.

"Of the eight Guinean and Liberian districts that share a border with Cote d'Ivoire (Ivory Coast), only one in Guinea is yet to report a confirmed or probable case of Ebola virus disease," the WHO warned in the statement.

Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone account for the bulk of infections of the deadly hemorrhagic fever, but there have been sporadic cases in Nigeria and Senegal, both now declared Ebola-free, as well as Spain, the United States and Mali.

A 2-year-old girl who brought Ebola to Mali may have had contact with up to 141 people, 57 of whom have yet to be traced, according to experts from the WHO and U.S. Centers for Disease Control concerned it could spread in Mali and beyond.

Liberia, the worst-hit country, may be seeing a decline in the spread of the virus, though the battle to contain the outbreak is far from won, the WHO said on Wednesday.

All 83 contacts of a health care worker in Spain infected with Ebola have completed a first 21-day incubation period for the virus, but a second one must follow before the country can be declared free of the disease, the WHO said on Friday. The nurse treated two Spanish priests repatriated from Liberia and Sierra Leone who later died.

(Reporting by Stephanie Nebehay; Editing by Dominic Evans)


BrerRabbit - 10/31/2014 at 08:23 PM

Seems like a nurse should be the first to understand the need for quarantine after exposure. Still, now she is a national media sensation, that's fun, and maybe she will get lots and lots of money from media exposure. She deserves all the attention and rewards she can, after being on the front line.


LeglizHemp - 10/31/2014 at 09:04 PM

I highly doubt she was the only medical worker to come back from the hot zone in the last 10 days, or was the only one to self monitor and go out in public.

also.....if she did her job right in africa and followed all the protocols, she was never exposed.

[Edited on 10/31/2014 by LeglizHemp]


2112 - 10/31/2014 at 09:08 PM

quote:
Even more good news !

Nurse #2 from the Dallas Hospital and sent to Emory Hospital in Atlanta is going home today.

BTW - Antone heard from Obama's Ebola Czar? Seems to be missing in action similar to Obama's Ebola response...




How is this good news??? She had Ebola!!! She should be quarantined forever! You can never be too careful! Come on man, we've had 4 cases of Ebola in America!!! This is a major outbrake! She's going to kill us all!!! Damn that Obama!!!!


emr - 11/2/2014 at 02:26 PM

1 - re: the nurse in Maine. The governor said "How can we trust her to monitor herself; she has lied every step of the way."

2 - Article in NY Times today say health officials estimate that by next year there will either be a handful of new cases in the US; or up to 130. DOes anyone have a clue how that will tax our healthcare system? Or how 130 can turn into 1000 very quickly?

3 - err on the side of caution. There is still too much we don't know about this disease.


LeglizHemp - 11/5/2014 at 03:23 PM

more stupid people doing stupid things

http://www.10tv.com/content/stories/2014/11/05/kentucky-teacher-resigns-ami d-ebola-scare.html


Kentucky Teacher Resigns Amid Ebola Scare
Wednesday November 5, 2014 9:55 AM

CBS NEWS - An elementary school teacher in Louisville, Kentucky, has left her job after being put on paid "precautionary leave" for 21 days over fears of Ebola - even though she'd never been to a country affected by the Ebola outbreak.

The teacher, Susan Sherman, resigned from St. Margaret Mary Catholic School after being put on leave following a mission trip to Kenya.

Sherman told CBS Louisville station WLKY the school asked her to stay out of the classroom because of concerns from students, parents and parishioners. She blamed the decision on ignorance.

Sherman, a registered nurse, and her husband, Paul, a retired surgeon, had gone to Kenya on a medical mission with a faith-based volunteer group called Kenya Relief, the Louisville Courier-Journal newspaper reported.

"We don't have Ebola in Kenya," Steve James, the founder of Kenya Relief, told the paper.

The Louisville archdiocese acknowledged that the Kenyan village where Sherman went was located "in Eastern Africa, thousands of miles from West Africa, where the main outbreak of the virus is located." But the school said it was moving ahead with plans to replace her.

This is not the first case of misplaced Ebola fears impacting people who had no apparent risk of exposure to the disease.

Last week, a family in Milford, Connecticut, filed a federal lawsuit after their daughter was barred from third grade when she returned from attending a relative's wedding in Nigeria.

The girl, Ikeoluwa Opayemi, was told to stay home from Meadowside Elementary School for 21 days "due to concern from certain parents and teachers that she could transmit Ebola to other children," according to the lawsuit. The virus has a three-week incubation period.

Nigeria, like Kenya, currently has no known cases of Ebola. In July, a man from Liberia - which does have a serious outbreak - flew into Nigeria, developed Ebola symptoms and died, infecting several health care workers in the process. But the World Health Organization says there have been no new cases in Nigeria in months and that the outbreak there was successfully stopped.

In the Bronx, two middle school boys originally from Senegal - which is also officially Ebola-free - said students have been harassing them with Ebola taunts.

The only actual Ebola case known in the U.S. right now is that of Dr. Craig Spencer, a doctor in New York City who was infected while treating patients in Guinea. He is listed in stable condition at Bellevue Hospital.


emr - 11/5/2014 at 04:13 PM

Those are really stupid things; being triply vigilant re:Quarantine for people who have had potential exposure is a different story


LeglizHemp - 11/7/2014 at 01:21 PM

http://www.bizjournals.com/dallas/blog/morning_call/2014/11/dallas-expected -to-be-declared-ebola-free-today.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium= feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+industry_6+(Industry+Health+Care)

Dallas expected to be declared Ebola free today
Nov 7, 2014, 6:23am CST

Dallas is expected to be declared Ebola free on Friday, as the final person being monitored by health officials is expected to come off the watch list.

The Ebola outbreak began in early October when Thomas Eric Duncan was diagnosed with the disease at Texas Health Presbyterian Dallas hospital. He died of the disease there on Oct. 8.

Two nurses who cared for Duncan, Nina Pham and Amber Vinson, later were diagnosed with the disease and were eventually transferred to hospitals in other cities where they recovered.

A total of 177 people were on the Texas Department of State Health Services watch list, the agency said. Included on the list were family and friends of the victims, as well as community members who might have had contact with them.

The last person on the list was a hospital worker who handled medical waste on Oct. 17, the agency said. No new cases have been reported, the agency said.


LeglizHemp - 11/7/2014 at 01:26 PM

http://www.twincities.com/nation/ci_26889974/look-at-worst-ever-ebola-epide mic-by-numbers

A look at the worst-ever Ebola epidemic by numbers
Maria Cheng AP Medical Writer

LONDON (AP) — As the biggest-ever outbreak of Ebola continues to ravage West Africa, here are a few key numbers to get a handle on the epidemic:

13,042 and 4,818:

According to an update this week from the World Health Organization, there have been 13,042 Ebola cases and 4,818 deaths since the first child died of the virus in December — but those figures include all probable, suspected and confirmed cases and are subject to change as more information becomes available. The numbers have actually dropped slightly in the past week because numbers fluctuate as more data becomes available, and as probable and suspected cases are either discarded or confirmed.

Experts warn the number of cases and deaths are likely far below the actual numbers, as people may be reluctant to seek care and officials are too overwhelmed with control efforts to record every single case. The vast majority of patients are in Guinea, Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Cases and deaths are typically only recorded days after people become symptomatic or die, which complicates a real-time understanding of Ebola.

"We are definitely getting a delayed picture of the outbreak," said Sebastian Funk, a lecturer in infectious diseases at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. "It's difficult to tell if we are reaching a turning point or if there will be a doomsday scenario. I could see it going either way at the moment."4,707:

According to WHO, 4,707 beds are needed across West Africa in Ebola treatment clinics; at the moment, just 22 percent of the necessary number are operational. The agency estimates a further 2,685 beds are needed for basic Ebola clinics where minimal treatment is provided and people are mostly isolated while waiting for test results. At the moment, just 4 percent of beds in these community clinics are available.

Given the uncertainty around case numbers, Funk says things like bed occupancy are a good sign of how the outbreak is evolving. "We really need to see numbers go down for several weeks to be confident it's a real trend," he said.

546:

WHO reports that 546 health workers have been infected with Ebola, of whom 310 have died. Since Ebola is spread via contact with the bodily fluids of a patient, health workers are at high risk of catching the disease. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that no skin be showing in a health worker treating Ebola patients.

Eight:

There are now eight countries that have reported Ebola detected on their soil: Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, Mali, Nigeria, Senegal, Spain and the U.S. Other countries like Britain, France and Germany have taken in people sickened by the deadly virus in West Africa but they have not reported any spread of the virus there.

Four:

There have been four cases of Ebola in the U.S. and a single death — Thomas Eric Duncan, the Liberian man who was the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the country, who later died at a Dallas hospital. Three other cases of Ebola have been reported in the U.S., all in health workers who had direct exposure taking care of Ebola patients.

Two:

It took two months for Britain to build and open its first Ebola treatment center in Sierra Leone this week, an 80-bed facility with a dozen other beds reserved for infected health workers. The Kerry Town clinic, near the capital, Freetown, is the first of six centers to be built by the U.K. in Sierra Leone. It includes a triage center, ambulance pads, laboratory, pharmacies and decontamination units. In about the same time that it took to build the Ebola clinic, Sierra Leone has reported more than 3,500 cases of Ebola.

One:

There is one remaining American hospitalized with Ebola, Dr. Craig Spencer in New York, a physician who worked for Doctors Without Borders in Guinea. He continues to show improvement, remains in isolation and is in stable condition.


LeglizHemp - 11/8/2014 at 12:08 AM

this one i don't care if people like media matters or not....they have documented this well.

http://mediamatters.org/research/2014/11/07/with-midterms-in-the-rear-view- fox-no-longer-te/201498

With Midterms In The Rear-View, Fox No Longer Terrified Of Ebola
Research 2 hours and 55 minutes ago ››› LIS POWER

Fox News pivoted its stance on the public health threat posed by Ebola after leading the charge in media stoking fears about the disease in the weeks prior to the midterm elections. The network is now downplaying the urgency of increasing funding for Ebola research and relief efforts while criticizing President Obama's request of a multi-billion dollar Ebola emergency appropriation from Congress.



President Obama Requested $6.2 Billion Emergency Funds For Ebola Research And Relief

President Obama Requested More Than $6 Billion In Emergency Funding To Fight Ebola At Home And Abroad. According to a November 5 article in The Washington Post, President Obama sent a letter to Republican House Speaker John Boehner on Election Day requesting a congressional appropriation of emergency funding to contain the Ebola outbreak in Africa, secure the United States against future outbreaks, and speed up the development of vaccines and other treatments for the disease:

The request asks for $4.6 billion immediately and an additional $1.54 billion as a contingency fund in case the epidemic worsens. The administration's request includes $2.43 billion for the Department of Health and Human Services, which includes the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. And $1.98 billion would go to the U.S. Agency for International Development, the lead agency for the U.S. response in West Africa.

The State Department would get $127 million to help with medical support and evacuation of workers overseas. The Pentagon's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, would get $112 million for developing new technologies that could be used to treat Ebola and other infectious diseases until a vaccine can be developed.

Among other objectives, the emergency money would fund the creation of 50 Ebola treatment centers in the United States and buy personal protective equipment for health-care workers. It would also boost screening at airports and borders. [The Washington Post, 11/5/14]

After The Midterms, Fox News And Betsy McCaughey Question Whether Ebola Should Be A Focus

Fox's Peter Johnson, Jr.: Is The Ebola Crisis "Worthy Of All That Money Being Shipped Overseas?" During the November 7 episode of Fox News' Fox & Friends, Fox contributor Peter Johnson, Jr. hosted an interview with Betsy McCaughey in which they criticized President Obama's request for emergency funds to fight Ebola:

JOHNSON: President Obama asking congress for $6.2 billion in emergency funds to help fight Ebola in West Africa. But is this crisis worthy of all that money being shipped overseas? Would it be better spent on deadly diseases threatening Americans right here at home right now?

[...]

MCCAUGHEY: It's totally out of proportion, Peter. Five thousand people have died from Ebola. No Americans. Three hundred and sixty thousand Americans die from cancer every year. The president wants to spend a hundred times as much, per Ebola victim, as per cancer victim. That tells you what's going on here. [Fox News Channel, Fox & Friends, 11/7/14]

Betsy McCaughey: "The President May Be Exploiting" The "Man-Made" Sense Of Danger. During the same segment, Betsy McCaughey argued that President Obama is exploiting the so-called "sense of danger" in the U.S. caused by Ebola, which she called "a man-made problem." She went on to blame the World Health Organization and the White House for the spread of Ebola and reiterated calls for "travel restrictions" to and from West Africa:

MCCAUGHEY: The president may be exploiting the sense of danger right here in the United States. But the fact is, here in the U.S., the sense of Ebola as a danger is a man-made crisis. All previous Ebola outbreaks were confined to one continent, Africa. This virus does not have wings. But the World Health Organization and the White House are giving it wings, airplane wings, allowing it to spread to North America, Europe, Australia, other continents of the world. [Fox News Channel, Fox & Friends, 11/7/14]

Before The Midterms, Fox News Gave McCaughey A Platform To Amplify The Ebola Crisis

Your World: Money To Fight Ebola "Could Be Much More Wisely Spent Overseas." While appearing on Fox News' Your World on October 9, McCaughey advocated for sending money overseas to fight Ebola, rather than spending the money here in the United States (emphasis added):

MCCAUGHEY: Let's discuss also the preparations that are being undergone now in cities all across this country, especially in the five airport hubs, such as Chicago and New York, to prepare hospitals, to prepare transportation workers, to prepare EMS, first responders. Hundreds of millions of dollars preparing them in case there's an Ebola case here in the United States again. When in fact that money could be much more wisely spent overseas. [Fox News Channel, Your World with Neil Cavuto, via Media Matters 10/9/14]

Hannity: Obama Is Misleading The Country About The Possible Spread Of Ebola. While appearing on a "panel of medical experts" during the October 15 episode of Fox News' Hannity, McCaughey accused President Obama of lying to the American people about Ebola. She went on to criticize Obama for saying that an Ebola outbreak was unlikely:

HANNITY: What the president said earlier, in the unlikely event it gets here. He said the chances are low for an outbreak. And then of course, the head of the CDC, Dr. Frieden, he went out there and said, oh you don't need a special room, you just need a private room with a private bathroom.

MCCAUGHEY: Listen to the weasel words both of them used. Frieden said early on, there won't be a wide spread, he said a spread will not be likely, right? And tonight the president said, well, there may be more cases but it won't spread widely. Well what do they mean by that weasel word "widely," how many deaths are acceptable? One, two, 10? It's unacceptable for Americans to die from Ebola. [Fox News Channel, Hannity, 10/15/14]

Fox News Helped Hype Fears About Ebola Prior To The Elections

Fox's Peter Johnson, Jr. Suggested The Federal Government Is Holding Back Ebola Treatments. While discussing the shortage of the Ebola treatment drug ZMapp on the October 7 edition of Fox & Friends, Johnson suggested the shortage was "a poor example of federal government intervention" and blamed the federal grant structure for limiting production of the drug. [Media Matters, 10/7/14]

Fox's Dr. Ben Carson Stoked Fears That Someone Could Pay A Lab Worker $1 Million For Ebola-Tainted Urine. Appearing on Fox News' Your World, Fox contributor Dr. Ben Carson was featured in a segment on Ebola in August and warned, "we have to guard against worse-case scenarios" such as a lab worker selling Ebola-tainted urine. [Media Matters, 8/6/14]


BoytonBrother - 11/8/2014 at 09:49 PM

I don't expect any of the Obama-bashers to admit they were wrong about his handling of the issue. The bashing was just another clear example of ridiculous meritless criticism stemming from personal hatred, and nothing more. It's amazing they can't see how amateurish it makes them look to make such wild foolish statements.


Muleman1994 - 11/9/2014 at 03:31 AM

quote:
I don't expect any of the Obama-bashers to admit they were wrong about his handling of the issue. The bashing was just another clear example of ridiculous meritless criticism stemming from personal hatred, and nothing more. It's amazing they can't see how amateurish it makes them look to make such wild foolish statements.

_________________________

So where is obama's Ebola "Czar" klain?
Is he in self-quarantine?



jkeller - 11/9/2014 at 03:41 AM

quote:
quote:
I don't expect any of the Obama-bashers to admit they were wrong about his handling of the issue. The bashing was just another clear example of ridiculous meritless criticism stemming from personal hatred, and nothing more. It's amazing they can't see how amateurish it makes them look to make such wild foolish statements.

_________________________

So where is obama's Ebola "Czar" klain?
Is he in self-quarantine?





What has that got to do with anything? Your posts read like really bad non sequiturs.


Muleman1994 - 11/9/2014 at 04:31 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
I don't expect any of the Obama-bashers to admit they were wrong about his handling of the issue. The bashing was just another clear example of ridiculous meritless criticism stemming from personal hatred, and nothing more. It's amazing they can't see how amateurish it makes them look to make such wild foolish statements.

_________________________

So where is obama's Ebola "Czar" klain?
Is he in self-quarantine?





What has that got to do with anything? Your posts read like really bad non sequiturs.

_____________

Directly on the topic.

Reading comprehension just eludes you son.


jkeller - 11/9/2014 at 04:45 AM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
I don't expect any of the Obama-bashers to admit they were wrong about his handling of the issue. The bashing was just another clear example of ridiculous meritless criticism stemming from personal hatred, and nothing more. It's amazing they can't see how amateurish it makes them look to make such wild foolish statements.

_________________________

So where is obama's Ebola "Czar" klain?
Is he in self-quarantine?





What has that got to do with anything? Your posts read like really bad non sequiturs.

_____________

Directly on the topic.

Reading comprehension just eludes you son.

It had nothing to do with the post you quoted. My reading skills are fine. I am sure by now you realize that people here know what a joke you have become. The gift that keeps on giving.

BTW, all Klain is doing is running the office. You know, an office manager. Have you ever held a job?


Muleman1994 - 11/9/2014 at 06:15 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
quote:
I don't expect any of the Obama-bashers to admit they were wrong about his handling of the issue. The bashing was just another clear example of ridiculous meritless criticism stemming from personal hatred, and nothing more. It's amazing they can't see how amateurish it makes them look to make such wild foolish statements.

_________________________

So where is obama's Ebola "Czar" klain?
Is he in self-quarantine?





What has that got to do with anything? Your posts read like really bad non sequiturs.

_____________

Directly on the topic.

Reading comprehension just eludes you son.

It had nothing to do with the post you quoted. My reading skills are fine. I am sure by now you realize that people here know what a joke you have become. The gift that keeps on giving.

BTW, all Klain is doing is running the office. You know, an office manager. Have you ever held a job?

_____________________________________

I most certainly do hold a job and have for over a decade in an executive position in the field directly associated with the Ebola outbreak.

Klain is “running the office”? Man you really are clueless. Where did you get that information?
Nobody has seen or heard from him since his appointment as Czar. The CDC has yet to issue their “revised” (for the fourth time) guidelines.

I have meetings with the principle from government, NGOs and professionals usually monthly and one of the top agenda items has been the Ebola matter.
The government agencies representatives generally just sit there as their cabinet level bosses do not permit them to engage. It doesn’t matter because they don’t have any idea how to solve a real world problem. The NGO folks, while passionate do not have the resources to solve the problem.
The professionals know exactly what to do and have the resources but are constantly obstructed by the government representatives who have but one objective: cover for the White House and their political handlers.

While you sit there on your loading dock schlepping boxes, the professional world is working hard to get the job done. Soon we will be able to actually get more done now that we have a Congress that is working for the people instead of controlling them.

Its all good, your roach coach lunch will be there soon!


LeglizHemp - 11/11/2014 at 02:39 AM

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-29998398

10 November 2014 Last updated at 19:46 ET
New York Ebola doctor 'virus free'

An American doctor who became the first person to be diagnosed in New York with Ebola is to be released from hospital on Tuesday after he recovered.

A statement from city health officials declared that Craig Spencer "has been declared free of the virus".

He worked for Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) in Guinea and tested positive for Ebola on 23 October after he returned.

The news that he went on the subway and went bowling the night before falling ill had officials retracing his steps.

Dr Spencer is one of several Americans to have recovered after being treated at a specialist unit in the US.

A Liberian man died in Dallas after contracting the virus before coming to the country.

But the fatality rate in West Africa is much higher, where nearly 5,000 people have died.

In other developments:

New tactics including rapid-response teams are needed to defeat the Ebola virus in Liberia, according to the charity Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF)
Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf says four soldiers and their commanding officer will be punished after a boy was killed during protests against quarantine measures
Former Microsoft boss Bill Gates told the BBC that progress is being made in fighting the virus.

Dr Spencer was given an experimental drug, and blood plasma donated by another American who recovered from the disease, Nancy Writebol, according to the New York Times.

"After a rigorous course of treatment and testing, Dr Craig Spencer - the patient admitted and diagnosed with Ebola Disease Virus at HHC Bellevue Hospital Center - has been declared free of the virus," the city's health department said in a statement.

His movements around the city before he tested positive sparked two states, New York and New Jersey, to impose controversial quarantine measures for aid workers returning to the US from West Africa.

One nurse, Kaci Hickox, defied instructions to stay indoors because she had no symptoms and repeatedly tested negative.


LeglizHemp - 11/11/2014 at 11:23 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/11/politics/klain-ebola/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

Klain: Ebola as a weapon 'unlikely'
By Eric Bradner, CNN
updated 5:04 PM EST, Tue November 11, 2014

Washington (CNN) -- White House Ebola czar Ron Klain on Tuesday downplayed the chances of Ebola being used as a biological weapon after a scare in New Zealand.

Klain said he was briefed Tuesday after a small vial supposedly sent by jihadis and containing Ebola was sent to the offices of the New Zealand Herald newspaper. The newspaper sent the vial to Australia for testing.

"Based on our best information, I think the odds are high that this turns out to be a hoax," Klain said on CNN's "The Lead" with Jake Tapper.

He said U.S. officials are "always watching intelligence traffic and other indicators" to see if terror groups are using Ebola or other diseases as biological weapons, but that "we're not aware of any credible threat" and that the odds of that happening are low.

Klain touted the overall U.S. response to Ebola cases here and to the outbreak in West Africa, saying health officials have "tried to learn the lessons from Dallas," where the first case was diagnosed in the United States, by increasing training, preparation and protective gear at health facilities nationwide.

"What we've shown now is that we can successfully identify and isolate an Ebola patient, we can make sure he doesn't infect other people, we can treat him, and we can send him home safely," he said.

When President Barack Obama tapped Klain as his Ebola response coordinator, Republican lawmakers howled that the long-time political operative -- Klain served as Vice President Joe Biden's chief of staff and helped Obama with debate preparation during his re-election campaign -- isn't a medical professional.

But Klain told Tapper on Tuesday that he isn't serving in a role that requires a medical background.
"My role isn't to give medical advice, it's to coordinate this massive response that President Obama has marshaled here at home and in Africa," Klain said.


2112 - 11/12/2014 at 06:47 AM

So now there is not a single case of ebola in America. That damn Obama. He can't do anything right!


LeglizHemp - 11/12/2014 at 01:48 PM


BrerRabbit - 11/13/2014 at 08:27 PM


quote:
I most certainly do hold a job and have for over a decade in an executive position in the field directly associated with the Ebola outbreak.


Managing a fast-food chain?


jkeller - 11/13/2014 at 08:52 PM

quote:

quote:
I most certainly do hold a job and have for over a decade in an executive position in the field directly associated with the Ebola outbreak.


Managing a fast-food chain?




The complete lack of knowledge about Ebola and its treatment demonstrates that his "executive job" is another lies in a series of lies this guy puts out here on a daily basis. Mule doesn't have the intelligence or people skills to be any type of manager. If he does have a job, his coworkers probably feel much the same way we feel about him.


Muleman1994 - 11/13/2014 at 10:01 PM

quote:
quote:

quote:
I most certainly do hold a job and have for over a decade in an executive position in the field directly associated with the Ebola outbreak.


Managing a fast-food chain?




The complete lack of knowledge about Ebola and its treatment demonstrates that his "executive job" is another lies in a series of lies this guy puts out here on a daily basis. Mule doesn't have the intelligence or people skills to be any type of manager. If he does have a job, his coworkers probably feel much the same way we feel about him.

_________________________________________________

Wish to compare paychecks junior?


Muleman1994 - 11/13/2014 at 10:03 PM

obama administration caves, will quarantine troops retuning from Africa?

text size US Troops Returning From Africa Head to Langley Updated: Thursday, November 13 2014, 12:51 PM EST WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon says about 80 troops returning from the Ebola mission in Africa will arrive Thursday in Virginia and be isolated for 21 days at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. Rear Admiral John Kirby is the Pentagon press secretary. Kirby says they will arrive around noon and be housed in buildings in a secluded area on the west side. He says none of the service members are showing any symptoms of Ebola. Langley and four other U.S. bases are designated as locations where troops returning from the Ebola mission could be housed while they undergo medical monitoring for three weeks. The 51 airmen, 27 sailors, four Marines and two soldiers will be able to communicate by phone and computer with their families. Copyright 2014 Associated Press.


jkeller - 11/13/2014 at 11:05 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:

quote:
I most certainly do hold a job and have for over a decade in an executive position in the field directly associated with the Ebola outbreak.


Managing a fast-food chain?




The complete lack of knowledge about Ebola and its treatment demonstrates that his "executive job" is another lies in a series of lies this guy puts out here on a daily basis. Mule doesn't have the intelligence or people skills to be any type of manager. If he does have a job, his coworkers probably feel much the same way we feel about him.

_________________________________________________

Wish to compare paychecks junior?



Your are a trip. You can be anybody you want to be on the internet. What are you going to do, mail me a paystub? Hilarious. You are as phony as the day is long. You know nothing about Ebola but you are an exec involved with it. Hey remember when you said you were in the Marines for 7 years? How did you do that? An enlistment is for 4 years with another 4 years of active or inactive reserve service. How did you make 7 years? Bad conduct discharge? Or were you some wounded hero who was released from service before you got your Medal of Honor for courage under fire.

You are the gift that keeps on giving.

[Edited on 11/14/2014 by jkeller]


LeglizHemp - 11/13/2014 at 11:29 PM

quote:
obama administration caves, will quarantine troops retuning from Africa?

text size US Troops Returning From Africa Head to Langley Updated: Thursday, November 13 2014, 12:51 PM EST WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon says about 80 troops returning from the Ebola mission in Africa will arrive Thursday in Virginia and be isolated for 21 days at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. Rear Admiral John Kirby is the Pentagon press secretary. Kirby says they will arrive around noon and be housed in buildings in a secluded area on the west side. He says none of the service members are showing any symptoms of Ebola. Langley and four other U.S. bases are designated as locations where troops returning from the Ebola mission could be housed while they undergo medical monitoring for three weeks. The 51 airmen, 27 sailors, four Marines and two soldiers will be able to communicate by phone and computer with their families. Copyright 2014 Associated Press.



the military has been doing this since the 1st group came back a few weeks ago accept that was in germany i believe ....about 3 weeks ago. it is a military decision. i might have posted that already...i can't remember. military personnel are different from civilians.

[Edited on 11/13/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 11/13/2014 by LeglizHemp]


Muleman1994 - 11/14/2014 at 03:46 AM

quote:
quote:
obama administration caves, will quarantine troops retuning from Africa?

text size US Troops Returning From Africa Head to Langley Updated: Thursday, November 13 2014, 12:51 PM EST WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pentagon says about 80 troops returning from the Ebola mission in Africa will arrive Thursday in Virginia and be isolated for 21 days at Joint Base Langley-Eustis. Rear Admiral John Kirby is the Pentagon press secretary. Kirby says they will arrive around noon and be housed in buildings in a secluded area on the west side. He says none of the service members are showing any symptoms of Ebola. Langley and four other U.S. bases are designated as locations where troops returning from the Ebola mission could be housed while they undergo medical monitoring for three weeks. The 51 airmen, 27 sailors, four Marines and two soldiers will be able to communicate by phone and computer with their families. Copyright 2014 Associated Press.



the military has been doing this since the 1st group came back a few weeks ago accept that was in germany i believe ....about 3 weeks ago. it is a military decision. i might have posted that already...i can't remember. military personnel are different from civilians.

[Edited on 11/13/2014 by LeglizHemp]

[Edited on 11/13/2014 by LeglizHemp]

_______________________________________________________________

The military is under the direct control of the obama administration.
So are you saying that while the obama administration does not think anyone returning from Western Africa should be put in a mandatory quarantine but the military shall be quarantined?

BTW - nobody really knows do they because obama's Ebola Czar is apparently in self quarantine. No one has heard from Klain and no policy has been issued.


LeglizHemp - 11/14/2014 at 03:50 AM

Gupta spreading a little uncertainty.

http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/13/health/nebraska-ebola-patient/index.html?hpt= hp_t1

Nebraska hospital prepares for new Ebola patient
From Elizabeth Cohen, Senior Medical Correspondent
updated 8:21 PM EST, Thu November 13, 2014

(CNN) -- A surgeon who's a Sierra Leone national and a legal permanent resident of the United States will be transported from Sierra Leone to The Nebraska Medical Center for treatment for Ebola, a government official familiar with the situation said.

The doctor is expected to arrive this weekend, most likely Saturday, the official said.

The official said it's not known whether the doctor was working in an Ebola treatment unit or some other type of hospital. The surgeon is married to a U.S. citizen and has children, the official said.


Sierra Leone has seen more than 5,300 cases of Ebola and more than 1,100 deaths in this year's outbreak of the deadly virus, according to figures from the World Health Organization.

The Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha is one of four hospitals in the United States that have biocontainment units and years of preparation in handling highly infectious disease such as Ebola.

Doctors there have already treated two American Ebola patients. Dr. Rick Sacra was treated at the hospital and released in September. Ashoka Mukpo, a freelance cameraman who worked for NBC, was treated there and released last month.

Sacra and Mukpo contracted the virus in Liberia and were later flown to the United States for treatment.

So far, the limited number of Ebola cases treated in the United States have shown a higher survival rate than cases treated in West Africa.

A number of factors could impact the latest patient's treatment, CNN Chief Medical Correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta told "AC360."

"We don't know how sick he is. We don't know what stage of the disease he is (in)," Gupta said.

The fact that doctors have decided to transport him gives some indication of his condition, Gupta said.

"Just the simple act of transporting somebody from West Africa to the United States, the person's got to be medically stable enough as well," Gupta said.

"So the fact that they're going to do that transport, that probably gives some idea of how he's doing overall in terms of stability."


LeglizHemp - 11/14/2014 at 03:53 AM

no, i am saying it was a military decision.


LeglizHemp - 11/17/2014 at 01:59 PM

http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/17/health/ebola-u-s-/index.html?hpt=hp_t2

Doctor's death marks second U.S. Ebola fatality
By Ashley Fantz, CNN
updated 8:41 AM EST, Mon November 17, 2014

(CNN) -- Marking the second Ebola death in the United States, Dr. Martin Salia died at around 5 a.m. ET Monday, according to Nebraska Medicine spokesman Taylor Wilson.

A legal permanent resident of the U.S., Salia was working in West Africa when he contracted the virus.

Salia arrived Saturday at Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha. The hospital tweeted Monday that he was "extremely critical" when his treatment began and "unfortunately, despite our best efforts, we weren't able to save him."

Salia was suffering from advanced symptoms of Ebola, including kidney and respiratory failure, health officials said.


emr - 11/17/2014 at 05:49 PM

Scary thing is his blood test was negatice. There is still much we don't know - any erro should be on the side of caution


gondicar - 11/17/2014 at 06:29 PM

quote:
Scary thing is his blood test was negatice. There is still much we don't know - any erro should be on the side of caution


Now sure who you mean by "we", but it has been studied extensively since first being discovered in the 60s and much more is known than most people realize. As for the negative test, see below...

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/11/17/ebola-death-martin-sal ia/19162043/

Smith said Salia tested negative for the virus on Nov. 7, in the early days of his illness. Smith said "false negative" test results are possible in the first days of symptoms when the viral load is relatively low. Salia ultimately tested positive for the virus Nov. 10.

Daniel Johnson, director of critical care at Nebraska Medical Center, said Salia was critically ill when he arrived at the hospital, where the medical team quickly had to combat kidney and respiratory failure. Salia was placed on dialysis, required a ventilator and received plasma from a surviving Ebola patient, Smith said.

Multiple medications included experimental ZMapp therapy, a new drug that has shown promise in fighting the disease.

"We used every possible treatment available to give Dr. Salia every possible opportunity for survival," Smith said. "As we have learned, early treatment with these patients is essential. In Dr. Salia's case, his disease was already extremely advanced by the time he came here for treatment."

[Edited on 11/17/2014 by gondicar]


emr - 11/17/2014 at 07:04 PM

quote:
quote:
Scary thing is his blood test was negatice. There is still much we don't know - any erro should be on the side of caution


Now sure who you mean by "we", but it has been studied extensively since first being discovered in the 60s and much more is known than most people realize. As for the negative test, see below...

http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/11/17/ebola-death-martin-sal ia/19162043/

Smith said Salia tested negative for the virus on Nov. 7, in the early days of his illness. Smith said "false negative" test results are possible in the first days of symptoms when the viral load is relatively low. Salia ultimately tested positive for the virus Nov. 10.

Daniel Johnson, director of critical care at Nebraska Medical Center, said Salia was critically ill when he arrived at the hospital, where the medical team quickly had to combat kidney and respiratory failure. Salia was placed on dialysis, required a ventilator and received plasma from a surviving Ebola patient, Smith said.

Multiple medications included experimental ZMapp therapy, a new drug that has shown promise in fighting the disease.

"We used every possible treatment available to give Dr. Salia every possible opportunity for survival," Smith said. "As we have learned, early treatment with these patients is essential. In Dr. Salia's case, his disease was already extremely advanced by the time he came here for treatment."

[Edited on 11/17/2014 by gondicar]


We as a medical community; the guy was relatively sick when he had a false negative test. I still feel that re: travel limits; quarantine; etc the margin of error should be on public safety. We are discussing the same facts - we just disagree on what should be done with those facts. The same way that tests can have false positive/negative results protocols are not 100% secure.


LeglizHemp - 11/17/2014 at 07:21 PM

http://thehill.com/policy/healthcare/224389-cdcs-frieden-ebola-epidemic-now here-near-over

Ebola epidemic 'nowhere near over' in West Africa, CDC director says
By Elise Viebeck - 11/17/14 01:29 PM EST

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Thomas Frieden said the Ebola epidemic is "nowhere near over" in West Africa, despite a decline in cases in Liberia, one of the hardest-hit countries.

Speaking at an event at the Aspen Institute on Monday, Frieden compared the epidemic to a widening forest fire that could easily spread to other regions in Africa. He said he was "very concerned" by the idea that Ebola is receding, which has been promoted by some media outlets.

"It's nowhere near over," Frieden said. "It's going to be a very long, hard fight. … There are so many cases that we're not able to do the kind of outbreak control that is needed."

Frieden repeated several times, "We have a long way to go" while discussing the CDC's response on the ground and in the United States.

The World Health Organization announced last week that the Ebola death toll now exceeds 5,000, a number that likely underestimates the true number of fatalities.

Reports indicated that some new cases are due to a surge of the disease in Freetown, Sierra Leone. Mali also has a new cluster of cases that is concerning to global health officials.

Ebola was back in U.S. headlines Monday, when an American surgeon died of the virus after being transported from Sierra Leone to Omaha, Neb., for treatment.

The surgeon, Martin Salia of Maryland, initially tested negative for the disease. He arrived at the Nebraska Medical Center in critical condition over the weekend.


BrerRabbit - 11/17/2014 at 10:07 PM


you put de lime in de coconut, drink Ebola....


LeglizHemp - 11/19/2014 at 06:22 PM




LeglizHemp - 11/24/2014 at 02:17 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/11/21/world/africa/ebola-spread-has-slowed-in-l iberia-cdc-says.html?_r=0

Ebola Spread Has Slowed in Liberia, C.D.C. Says
By HELENE COOPERNOV. 20, 2014


WASHINGTON — The international response to West Africa’s Ebola epidemic, coupled with more effective action by local communities, has stopped the exponential spread of the disease in one of the hardest-hit countries, Liberia, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said on Thursday.

In confirming what health officials and news organizations had reported for weeks, Dr. Thomas R. Frieden, the C.D.C. director, said that a previous worse-case projection by the agency that the Ebola epidemic could lead to 1.4 million cases by late January unless effective measures were taken to contain it was no longer applicable, crediting what he called “good progress” in Liberia.

“There’s been a substantial change in the trend,” Dr. Frieden said during a conference call with reporters. “There is no longer exponential increase, and in fact, there’s been a decrease” in the rate of infections in Liberia.

Health officials are less certain of the rate of infections in Guinea, another of the three most affected countries. Dr. Frieden said that in the third country, Sierra Leone, “both their epidemic and their response are several weeks behind Liberia.” He added that he hoped an increase in international aid to Sierra Leone, particularly from Britain, would help bring down the numbers there as well.

His comments came a day after the Pentagon said it was scaling back the size and number of Ebola treatment facilities that American troops are building in Liberia. Defense officials said that instead of building 17 units, as promised by President Obama, the military would build 10 treatment facilities, and that seven of them would have 50 beds each, rather than the 100 beds previously planned.

In addition, two other units that were to have been built by American troops will be built instead by an international aid group, administration officials said. Defense officials also said they were scaling back the number of American military personnel responding to the epidemic in West Africa, to 3,000 from 4,000.

Still, American defense and health officials cautioned that Ebola remained a significant health crisis in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, and warned against letting up in the international aid effort there.

“There have been big changes in community behavior,” Dr. Frieden said. But he added that there were still, by some estimates, 1,000 to 2,000 new Ebola cases a week — the bulk of those now in Guinea and Sierra Leone. He said the effort to combat Ebola would continue to require “a massive undertaking” to chase each case, including finding people who have had contact with the virus.

The World Health Organization’s latest update on Ebola, posted Wednesday on its website, said the number of confirmed, probable and suspected cases totaled 15,145, with 5,420 reported deaths, as of Sunday. Nearly all were in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, with two deaths in the United States.

Though reported cases no longer appear to be increasing in Liberia or Guinea, the update said, “transmission remains intense and widespread in Sierra Leone,” with Freetown, the capital, remaining the worst-affected area.

The update also said that at least 584 health care workers, who are among those most at risk of contracting the disease, had been infected, and that 329 had died.

Cuban health officials reported Tuesday that a Cuban doctor, one of the 165 medical workers sent by Cuba to help battle the Ebola outbreak, had become the first in that group to be infected. The doctor, identified as Felix Baez, had been treating patients in Sierra Leone and was flown to Switzerland for treatment.



[Edited on 11/24/2014 by LeglizHemp]


LeglizHemp - 11/25/2014 at 02:50 PM

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2014/11/25/millions-promised-for-ebol a-not-adding-up.html


Millions Promised for Ebola Not Adding Up

Of the countries that promised money to fight Ebola, little has been delivered: 7 percent of China’s $122 million pledge, 17 percent of the $265 million promised by the EU, and 43 percent of the United States’ $572 million.

“Countries have promised resources to fight Ebola. Which have delivered?”

It’s this question that inspired nonprofit ONE.org to create an Ebola tracker to figure out just that. While the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), the UN, and the World Bank have data on the dollar figures associated with each pledge, no one had taken the time to figure out how much of those resources have actually made it to the ground in West Africa.

The answer, as of today, isn’t much.

Culling information directly from government representatives, press releases, technical bodies, and other research, ONE has zeroed in on what exactly the international relief effort in West Africa looks like, at this point. The tracker focuses on three specific forms of support: financing, health-care personnel, and in-kind contributions. This “deeper dive” into individual country’s commitments, ONE hopes, will persuade leaders to put their money where their mouth is.

In the financing portion, the numbers are particularly bleak. While China has pledged $122 million to the fight, it has thus far only dispersed 7 percent of that number. Of the $265 million pledged by EU Institutions, just 17 percent have reached the epidemic’s hot zone. Even private institutions, which most likely have less bureaucratic hurdles to deal with, have been slow to pull the trigger. The Silicon Valley Community Fund has thus far sent 0 percent of the 25 million pledged. At the Google/Larry Page Family Foundation, it’s the identical equation.

Erin Hohlfelder, global health policy director at ONE and the brains behind the tracker, says the tracker shows the importance in transparency. “It’s one thing to make a great pledge and commit to doing that,” says Hohlfelder. “But in the meantime, every day that goes by without these resources is a missed opportunity.” While progress has been made in the months since those pledges, there is much work still to be done.

The largest and longest Ebola epidemic of its kind, the crisis has resulted in an estimated 15,351 cases of Ebola and 5,459 deaths since March—numbers that the World Health Organization’s director has called a “vast underestimate” of the reality. While Liberia has shown progress in halting the epidemic’s spread, in continues to grow in neighboring Sierra Leone and Mali. According to October estimates from the World Bank, the epidemic could cost the West African countries affected upward of $32 billion in the next 24 months.

If more help doesn’t arrive soon, the worst may not be over.

If there’s a reason for delay in stopping the epidemic, she says, the lack of resources may be to blame. “This isn’t a nice-to-do development project, this is still an emergency,” Hohlfelder tells me. “While we wouldn’t expect 100 percent dispersal, a lot of these are pathetically low.”

The outbreak, which has now spanned eight countries and four continents, has largely centered on three countries in West Africa: Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Guinea. In some ways, the rapid spread of the virus there should not be surprising. Crippled by bitter decade-long civil wars, all three countries were in the midst of rebuilding broken health-care systems when the epidemic struck. Void of basic necessities like running water, many towns were struggling to meet even basic rudimentary health-care needs—a predicament that left them woefully unprepared for the onslaught of a major global health crisis.

Ebola hasn’t simply overwhelmed these health-care systems—it has decimated them. Women in need of support for childbirth have been turned away, leading to an increase in infant morality rates in a region with the some of the highest numbers in the world. Kids suffering from malaria or extreme diarrhea are now too often left without medical care. Life-saving vaccines for those illnesses and others are—without enough medical workers to dispense them—going unused.

It’s safe to say that restoring peace in the health-care systems of these three countries will be a marathon, not a sprint. But in order to commence rebuilding them from the ground up, the world must first put out the fires of this current epidemic. As leaders across the world continue to assert, the war is far from won.

At a press conference last week, Liberian President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf said that the progress her country has made may be damaging. “Our government remains concerned that progress in this battle will lead to complacency on the part of the international community,” said Sirleaf. “We must not interpret gains as an outright victory—nothing could be more dangerous.”

Head of the UN Mission for Emergency Ebola Response (UNMEER) Anthony Banbury said this week in Washington that containing the epidemic still calls for a “tremendous increase” in resources on the ground. “We are far, far away from ending this crisis,” said Banbury. “There is a long battle ahead of us.”

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon echoed these remarks at another meeting in Washington D.C. on Wednesday. After acknowledging that there has been a “bend in the curve” and a reason to hope, he warned against inaction. “We need more international responders—trained medical teams and volunteer health workers—especially in remote districts,” said Ban. “I am asking the international community to continue their support. Our experts say that we need to have at least fivefold strength and support, because, still, the international response is outpaced by this Ebola spread.”

Margaret Chan, director of the World Health Organization, followed Ban’s remarks. “We must not forget—Ebola virus is a formidable enemy. Yes, we are seeing some early signals of hope. Cases are stabilizing. But as Mr. Secretary-General was saying, we are also seeing some new areas where they are reporting new cases,” said Chan. “We must maintain our vigilance. Complacency would be our enemy. And in order to get it to zero, we have been successful in bending the curve a bit, but we need to continue to do more to get to zero.”

Inspired by this, the United States urged world leaders to raise $100 million in additional funds for West Africa’s debts, allowing them to “reinvest” in health and other public programming.

Even in the United States, which is leading the pack financially (having dispersed 43 percent of the $572 million pledged thus far), concern for the global health crisis is waning. At an important Ebola meeting on Capital Hill last week, Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill was shocked to find it half-full. “Fascinating. Empty seats and no cameras for hearing on Ebola & public health…” she tweeted.

As the holidays approach, Hohlfelder worries that concern will further dwindle. “I think it will be really critical in the weeks to come,” she says. “Even if the attention spans continue to wane, we’re hopeful that we can do our small part and remind people that this crisis isn’t over—and even when it ends there will still be a rebuilding effort on the ground.”


LeglizHemp - 11/26/2014 at 02:04 PM

http://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2014/nov/26/ebola-isolation-us-military- base-pretty-much-vacation?CMP=twt_gu


Ebola isolation at US military base is 'pretty much vacation'

US troops returning from their Ebola mission in west Africa must spend 21 days in seclusion but life at their Virginia transit camp is not so tough

Associated Press in Hampton, Virginia
Wednesday 26 November 2014 08.10 EST

With plenty of flat screen TVs, game nights and even an outdoor fire pit, life in isolation for members of the US military who have returned from the Ebola mission in west Africa can look a lot like summer camp.

The Defense Department is requiring military service members to undergo 21 days of isolation and monitoring as a precaution, but that doesn’t mean the troops are sitting in a hospital or even just one building. At Langley air force base, one of five US bases designated to house returning service members for monitoring, a wooded section of the base near the runway has been turned into a small village.

Nearly 1,800 US troops have been deployed to Liberia and Senegal for the Ebola mission, along with almost 100 contractors and nearly 60 Defense Department civilians.

The 90 service members at Langley are among the first to return home since the Defense Department began requiring isolation as a precaution in November. They weren’t exposed to the deadly virus or any Ebola patients, but helped set up a facility in Liberia to treat medical workers who would be. For those in isolation, temperatures are taken twice daily. No one has exhibited any symptoms of virus since returning on 13 November.

Officially called the Langley transit center, the encampment hosts 21 small buildings that include dormitories, bathroom and shower facilities, a fitness center, cafeteria and an entertainment and recreation center.

“All I can say about this camp, Langley, it’s pretty much vacation. It’s Wi-Fi everywhere, flat screens everywhere, big gym to either lift or run. There’s an asphalt road kind of running around the perimeter that you can work out on,” said Chief Petty Officer Jason Knifley, an equipment operator stationed at Naval Construction Battalion Gulfport, Mississippi. He added, “This isn’t bad at all.”

The center is outfitted with video games, a small library and commercial internet, to allow service members to video chat with friends and family. There are often bingo, pool and ping-pong tournaments.




In the small dormitories, between six and eight service members each get their own full-size bed. The base allows each of the people in isolation to pick what they want for their three hot meals a day. A traditional Thanksgiving meal will be served on Thursday, and a Turkey Trot race and football game at an adjacent field will also be held for those in isolation.

Captain Jasamine Pettie, who the air force has dubbed the transit center’s mayor, said outside groups are also trying to meet the personal needs of the individuals who are there by getting donations for things like protein shakes and Gatorade. Sometimes, her job includes responding to small requests to have more bananas instead of apples and making sure printers have paper.

For air force Major Jeffrey Chaperon, a hospital administrator based at Langley who is under quarantine after working in Liberia, a lot of time at the center is spent exercising. He said the group of airmen, sailors, marines and soldiers at the facility are all keeping a positive attitude.

“They’ve outfitted this place very nice for us. They’ve offered a lot of amenities and morale type things for us to do. I will say it’s better than where we came from,” he said.

“Most of us have been in far worse conditions than this, and it’s only 21 days. You can stand on your head for three weeks if you’ve got to.”


LeglizHemp - 12/2/2014 at 10:50 PM

the numbers on 11/11/14 were 13,042 and 4,818
now we are at 16,000 and 7000

this is the 1st month that both of those numbers didn't double. this doesn't mean we have won.

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30260532

29 November 2014 Last updated at 10:21 ET

Ebola outbreak: West Africa death toll nears 7,000

The number of people killed by the Ebola outbreak in West Africa has risen to 6,928, the World Health Organisation (WHO) says.

The toll has increased by over 1,000 since the WHO's last report on Wednesday, but it includes unreported deaths from earlier in the outbreak.

Experts say the infection rate is more significant that the death toll, as it reflects how the virus is spreading.

Infection rates are decreasing in Liberia, but are high in Sierra Leone.

There have been over 16,000 reported cases in Guinea, Sierra and Liberia.

Latest Ebola death tolls
Liberia: 7,244 cases, 4,181 deaths
Sierra Leone: 6,802 cases, 1,463 deaths
Guinea: 2,123 cases, 1,284 deaths

Mali has reported seven deaths from Ebola and 10 confirmed cases.

More than 4,181 people have died of Ebola in Liberia but while the country has recorded the highest number of cases, the rate of infection is slowing.

The outbreak was also now "stable" in Guinea, the World Health Organization (WHO) said last week.

The disease is now spreading fastest in Sierra Leone, with 6,802 cases reported in total.

Nigeria and Senegal are both clear of the quarantine period and no new cases or deaths have been reported.

Ebola is spread only through direct contact with the bodily fluids of an infected person showing symptoms, such as fever or vomiting.

People caring for the sick or handling the bodies of people infected Ebola are therefore especially vulnerable.


LeglizHemp - 12/9/2014 at 01:49 PM


LeglizHemp - 12/12/2014 at 02:25 PM

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/12/12/mali-ebola-_n_6314492.html

Last Known Ebola Patient In Mali Cured, Released
AP | By SARAH DiLORENZO
Posted: 12/12/2014 8:33 am EST

DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — The last Ebola patient being treated in Mali has survived the disease and been released, the Health Ministry said Friday, leaving no known cases in the West African country.

Mali had recorded eight cases of Ebola, all of them linked to people who crossed from neighboring Guinea. The country now has no confirmed or suspected cases, according to the ministry, but authorities are still monitoring 26 people who had contact with the sick. A person infected with Ebola can take up to 21 days to show symptoms.

The last patient was discharged on Thursday after several Ebola tests came back negative, the ministry said in a statement posted on its website.





Because people are still being monitored and a sick person could cross the border again, the government warned Malians to remain vigilant.

Countries are only declared free of Ebola when 42 days — twice the maximum incubation period — have passed since anyone has had contact with a confirmed or probable case.

In the current outbreak, Ebola has sickened more than 18,100 people, the vast majority in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. Of those, about 6,500 have died.

A photographer for the Washington Post sent to cover the outbreak in Liberia died on Thursday after collapsing while returning on foot from a village where he'd been working, the newspaper reported.

Michel du Cille, a three-time Pulitzer Prize winner, died before he reached Phebe Hospital in Bong County, Information Minister Lewis Brown told The Associated Press on Friday. It took two hours, traveling on dirt roads, to get Du Cille to the hospital after he collapsed, according to the paper.

Arrangements are being made to bring his body to Monrovia, Liberia's capital, Brown said.


LeglizHemp - 12/12/2014 at 02:27 PM

http://www.thehealthsite.com/news/latest-ebola-news-no-evidence-on-how-long -ebola-may-live/

Latest Ebola News: No evidence on how long Ebola may live
Agencies Dec 12, 2014 at 06:47 pm

Washington, Dec 11: According to a study published in the journal Environmental Science and Technology Letters, no one really knows whether the deadly Ebola virus can survive on glass surfaces or counter-tops or how long it remains active in water, wastewater, or sludge, new research has found. ‘The World Health Organisation has been saying you can put (human waste) in pit latrines or ordinary sanitary sewers and that the virus then dies,’ said Kyle Bibby of the University of Pittsburgh in US.

‘But the literature lacks evidence that it does. They may be right, but the evidence isn’t there,’ said Bibby. Bibby and colleagues from Drexel University explain that knowing how long the deadly pathogen survives on surfaces, in water, or in liquid droplets is critical to developing effective disinfection practices to prevent the spread of the disease. (Read: How the Ebola virus spreads in humans)

Currently, the World Health Organisation guidelines recommend to hospitals and health clinics that liquid wastes from patients be flushed down the toilet or disposed of in a latrine, researchers said. However, Ebola research labs that use patients’ liquid waste are supposed to disinfect the waste before it enters the sewage system. Bibby’s team set out to determine what research can and can’t tell us about these practices. (Read: 7 tips to prevent the spread of Ebola)

The researchers scoured scientific papers for data on how long the virus can live in the environment. They found a dearth of published studies on the matter. ‘That means no one knows for sure whether the virus can survive on a surface and cause infection or how long it remains active in water, wastewater, or sludge,’ researchers said. The team concluded that Ebola’s persistence outside the body needs more careful investigation. (Read: What is the Ebola virus disease survival rate?)

Source: PTI


LeglizHemp - 12/16/2014 at 02:55 PM

http://www.rawstory.com/rs/2014/12/ebola-exaggeration-is-politifacts-2014-l ie-of-the-year/

‘Ebola exaggeration’ is PolitiFact’s 2014 Lie of the Year
David Ferguson
16 Dec 2014 at 09:26 ET

PolitiFact, the nonpartisan fact-checking organization headquartered at the Tampa Bay Times announced Monday that exaggeration about the threat posed by the disease Ebola is its 2014 Lie of the Year.

In the weeks before the mid-term elections, Republican politicians, right-wing talk radio personalities and cable news networks seized upon the story as a way of attacking the public health system and, by proxy, President Barack Obama.

PolitiFact’s Angie Drobnic Holan and Aaron Sharockman wrote, “PolitiFact and PunditFact rated 16 separate claims about Ebola as Mostly False, False or Pants on Fire on our Truth-O-Meter in 2014. Ten of those claims came in October, as [Ebola patient Thomas Eric] Duncan’s case came to the fore and as voters went to the polls to select a new Congress.”





Former Reagan aide and Washington Post pundit George Will claimed against all medical evidence that Ebola can be passed from person-to-person via coughing or sneezing.

“The problem is the original assumption, said with great certitude if not certainty, was that you need to have direct contact, meaning with bodily fluids from someone, because it’s not airborne,” Will falsely said. “There are doctors who are saying that in a sneeze or some cough, some of the airborne particles can be infectious.”

Eager Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) claimed that the hemorrhagic fever is “incredibly contagious,” “very transmissible” and “easy to catch,” a set of claims that PolitiFact rated as “mostly false.”

“A Georgia congressman claimed there were reports of people carrying diseases including Ebola across the southern border. Pants on Fire. Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., said Americans were told the country would be Ebola-free. False,” said the group.

Some critics point out that there are ugly racial undertones when white pundits attack a black president for a disease epidemic that is and was largely confined to continental Africa.

Fox News’ resident psychiatrist Keith Ablow even went so far as to say that Obama “welcomes” Ebola to the U.S. because “his affinities are with” Africa and its diseases.

All-in-all, only a tiny number of Americans were ever at risk for contracting Ebola. Even people who lived intimately with the health care workers and travelers who were infected remained uninfected after their quarantines.

Nonetheless, PolitiFact said, “When combined, the claims edged the nation toward panic. Governors fought Washington over the federal response. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stumbled to explain details about transmission of the virus and its own prevention measures. American universities turned away people from Africa, whether they were near the outbreak or not.”


LeglizHemp - 12/20/2014 at 06:07 AM

not good for the ebola battle, countries who pledged aid money need to step up.

http://www.bbc.com/news/business-30548811

19 December 2014 Last updated at 08:34 ET
Nigeria makes further efforts to defend currency

Nigeria's central bank has brought in further measures to support its currency, the naira.

Buyers of foreign currency must use that money within 48 hours or be forced to sell it back at the rate set by the central bank.

The naira hit record lows this week of more than 187 against the dollar.

The prolonged fall in the oil price is causing serious problems for Nigeria, which is heavily dependent on the commodity.

Nigeria, which is Africa's largest oil producer, receives 70% of government revenue and 90% of all foreign exchange earnings from oil.

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) warned it would impose sanctions on anyone who did not follow its new rules.

Speculators are betting on further falls in the naira by buying foreign currency in the hope that they will be able to buy more when they reconvert their money back.

In November, the CBN devalued the naira to 168 against the dollar, but its action has not stopped it falling further.

Earlier this week, Nigeria was forced to revise its budget because of the dramatic fall in the price of oil.

Its finance minister, Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala, said its economy will now grow at 5.5% this year, rather than 6.4%.

In a separate development, Nigerian oil workers agreed to call off a strike that started on Monday.

A spokesman for one of the unions involved, Pengassan, said the government had given assurances that it would address union concerns over refinery maintenance.

This includes a renewed push to get a long-delayed bill passed in parliament, aimed at overhauling the industry and improving maintenance.


LeglizHemp - 1/6/2015 at 02:06 PM

the numbers on 11/11/14 were 13,042 and 4,818
now we are at 16,000 and 7000 12/2/14
now infected 20,000 people and killed 8,000. 1/6/15

things are slowing down dramtically but not out of the woods by a long shot.


LeglizHemp - 1/13/2015 at 04:18 PM

Inside the US Army's Ebola Lab in Liberia
Written by Brian Castner
January 13, 2015 // 09:45 AM EST

http://motherboard.vice.com/read/tappita-ebola-lab


LeglizHemp - 1/22/2015 at 02:01 PM

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-30932578

22 January 2015 Last updated at 08:41 ET
Ebola cases show 'turning point'
By James Gallagher
Health editor, BBC News website

There has been a "turning point" in the Ebola crisis, with cases falling in the three affected countries, World Health Organization officials say.

Just eight cases were detected in Liberia in the last week down from a peak of 500-a-week in September. Guinea and Sierra Leone have also seen falls.

The WHO said the figures were the "most promising" since the outbreak started.

But it continues to urge caution, and to highlight the need to find those who had contact with Ebola patients.

The largest outbreak of Ebola in human history has infected 21,724 people and killed 8,641 - largely in just three countries, Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea.

All are now showing falls in weekly cases:

Cases in Liberia stand at eight-per-week down from a peak of 509
Cases in Guinea stand at 20 per week down from a peak of 292
Cases in Sierra Leone stand at 117-per-week down from a peak of 748
There are now some days in Liberia where no cases are reported at all.

Dr Christopher Dye, the director of strategy in the office of the director general, told the BBC News website: "The incidence is pretty clearly going down in all three countries now.

"Each of the last three weeks has been the most promising we've seen so far, the message is reductions in all places.

"I would have identified the turning point as the beginning of the decline, first in Liberia and then later in Sierra Leone and Guinea."

Resurgence

However, he argued there was "no basis for complacency" due to the risk of a resurgence in cases.

It is also uncertain whether the downward trends will continue unless there are improvements in "contact tracing".

A single case is enough to start an entire outbreak so identifying everyone who comes into contact with Ebola is vital.

Yet the latest WHO situation report says the number of people being traced "remains lower than expected in many districts".

Dr Dye added: "Contact tracing to find every last case needs to be intensified and we need all guns blazing on all fronts."

Western Sierra Leone remains another problem.

Of the 145 cases reported across all affected countries last week, more than 100 were in that region, which includes the capital Freetown.

Speaking earlier this week, the UN system co-ordinator for Ebola, David Nabarro, said: "We have a very attractive and promising situation that leads us to believe that perhaps we are beginning to see the end of the outbreak.

"Unfortunately it's not quite as simple and the reason for that is any case of Ebola in the region can restart an outbreak very quickly."


LeglizHemp - 3/6/2015 at 04:06 PM

http://www.houghtonstar.com/2015/03/06/ebola-cases-decline-in-africa/

Ebola Cases Decline in Africa

Posted by Melissa Maclean March 6, 2015


According to the World Health Organization (WHO), the Ebola virus disease, formally known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, has taken approximately 9,700 lives since the first outbreak in 2014. Due to the high mortality rate, it is now classified as a “Risk Group Four Pathogen,” in accordance with the WHO pathogenicity standards.

Ebola_Virus_(2) In regard to geography, the majority of cases are confined to countries in West Africa—namely Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea— with exceptions of a few minor cross-cultural outbreaks.

However, in recent news, reports are showing a drastic decline in case numbers. Last week, WHO reported only five new cases in Liberia. This improvement has led the government to reopen schools for the first time in months, according to CNN news.

But not all Liberians are keen this immediate step towards “recovery,” and instead deem it as merely fostering a “relapse.”

To get a better understanding of this discrepancy, a personal interview was held last week with Liberia-stationed worker, Armando Costabile, to get a first-hand insight on the problem.

Costabile stated how he fears that the reopening of schools may have some adverse effects on the country. Moreover, he believes safety and caution should come first.

“While the thought of reopening schools appears as a positive landmark, I am weary of the backfire it could have, being this soon.”

Costabile continued his statement by referring to the “cycle of disease” he has witnessed over the years, “Ebola is not new to the Liberians. Outbreaks have occurred in cycles for over a decade.”

He further described the framework of this ‘disease cycle’ in his next statement, “A disease hits, people go into panic, help comes, the hype dwindles down, and people go right back to unsafe contact as if it did not happen.”

While Costabile claimed there are multiple factors playing into this problem, he subsequently highlighted the issue of culture,“I think one of the problems lies with cultural mindsets. This is a culture that lives the moment. While this has great aspects to it, it can often lead to forgetting everything of the past a little too quickly…”

Melissa MacLean GreyCostabile also described the issue with quarantines, and how there are “always one or two tribesmen who were missed and retreat to the bush.” Thus, the cultivation for a relapse begins. In other words, the disease “hides for a few years in the Bush, slowly leaks back into the city, and eventually outbreaks once again.” He states that it is the “nature of a virus.”

On a brighter note, in comparison to past outbreaks, Costabile is a little more hopeful this time with the new enactment of U.S. screenings. According to Costabile, this is the “most orderly and effective screening” he has ever witnessed.

Additionally, on February 8, 2015, WHO released another statement with news of a projected mass vaccination to counteract the crisis. Though the program is currently undergoing clinical trials, it is said that it will be fully decided on in August of this year.

Costabile is set to return to Liberia within the next month. Follow up interviews will be conducted to chart the progress, and/or demise. Only time will tell if the Ebola virus is truly concluding its existence.


tbomike - 3/6/2015 at 04:22 PM

So should we allow flights yet or should our borders still be shut down?


LeglizHemp - 3/23/2015 at 01:04 PM

http://www.bbc.com/news/health-32009508

23 March 2015 Last updated at 07:35 ET
Ebola outbreak 'over by August', UN suggests
By Smitha Mundasad
Health reporter, BBC News

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa will be over by August, the head of the UN Ebola mission has told the BBC.

Ismail Ould Cheikh Ahmed admitted the UN had made mistakes in handling the crisis early on, sometimes acting "arrogantly".

A year after the outbreak was officially declared, the virus has killed more than 10,000 people.

The medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres says a "global coalition of inaction" led to tragic consequences.

Looking back over the year, the charity suggests its early calls for help were ignored by local governments and the World Health Organization.

Most deaths occurred in the worst-affected countries of Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone.

The head of the UN Ebola response mission told the BBC, when the virus first struck, "there was probably a lack of knowledge and there was a certain degree of arrogance, but I think we are learning lessons.

"We have been running away from giving any specific date, but I am pretty sure myself that it will be gone by the summer."

'Turned away'

The first person to succumb to the disease during this outbreak is thought to have been a toddler in a remote part of Guinea. He died in December 2013.

Three months later the WHO officially announced an outbreak. And it was a further five months before the organisation declared it a public health emergency of international concern. At this point more than 1,000 people had lost their lives.

Henry Gray, MSF emergency coordinator, told the BBC: "We were well aware this was something different in March and April last year and we did try to bring this to the attention of the WHO but also governments within the countries affected.

"And of course it was frustrating that we weren't heard and that has probably led to the scale of the epidemic we see today."

The charity says it should also have used more of its own resources earlier in the crisis.

The analysis, which includes dozens of interviews with MSF staff, says by the end of August 2014 treatment centres in Liberia where overwhelmed.

In January 2015 at a rare emergency meeting, the WHO admitted it was too late to respond.

Dr Margaret Chan, director general, said: "The world, including WHO, was too slow to see what was unfolding before us."

Continued threat
But the organisation says it made it clear from the start "this was a very serious situation".

There are now proposals to build-up a rapid response team to react more swiftly to future threats.

Case numbers are falling but MSF says the outbreak is not yet over. Overall cases have not declined significantly since January, the charity warns.



Liberia recorded its first case in more than two weeks on Friday, dashing hopes the country would soon be declared virus-free.

In Guinea, cases are rising again after a dip at the beginning of the year.

Some patients in Sierra Leone are are not on lists of known Ebola contacts, suggesting chains of spread are going undetected.

Dr Derek Gatherer, at Lancaster University, said: "In retrospect, it is now apparent that the delay from December to March was crucial in the dissemination of the virus to several locations in eastern Guinea and then onto the capital, Conakry, which remains one of the few areas with active transmission."

But until zero cases are recorded in all three worst-affected countries for a period of at least six weeks, the outbreak will not be officially declared over.


LeglizHemp - 3/26/2015 at 11:29 PM

http://www.howardwfrench.com/2015/03/how-does-africa-get-reported-a-letter- of-concern-to-60-minutes/

How Does Africa Get Reported? A Letter Of Concern To 60 Minutes.
Posted March 25, 2015

March 25, 2015

Jeff Fager, Executive Producer, CBS 60 Minutes (by email)

Dear Mr. Fager,

We, the undersigned, are writing to express our grave concern about the frequent and recurring misrepresentation of the African continent by 60 Minutes.

In a series of recent segments from the continent, 60 Minutes has managed, quite extraordinarily, to render people of black African ancestry voiceless and all but invisible.

Two of these segments were remarkably similar in their basic subject matter, featuring white people who have made it their mission to rescue African wildlife. In one case these were lions, and in another, apes. People of black African descent make no substantial appearance in either of these reports, and no sense whatsoever is given of the countries visited, South Africa and Gabon.

The third notable recent segment was a visit by your correspondent Lara Logan to Liberia to cover the Ebola epidemic in that country. In that broadcast, Africans were reduced to the role of silent victims. They constituted what might be called a scenery of misery: people whose thoughts, experiences and actions were treated as if totally without interest. Liberians were shown within easy speaking range of Logan, including some Liberians whom she spoke about, and yet not a single Liberian was quoted in any capacity.

Liberians not only died from Ebola, but many of them contributed bravely to the fight against the disease, including doctors, nurses and other caregivers, some of whom gave their lives in this effort. Despite this, the only people heard from on the air were white foreigners who had come to Liberia to contribute to the fight against the disease.

Taken together, this anachronistic style of coverage reproduces, in condensed form, many of the worst habits of modern American journalism on the subject of Africa. To be clear, this means that Africa only warrants the public’s attention when there is disaster or human tragedy on an immense scale, when Westerners can be elevated to the role of central characters, or when it is a matter of that perennial favorite, wildlife. As a corollary, Africans themselves are typically limited to the role of passive victims, or occasionally brutal or corrupt villains and incompetents; they are not otherwise shown to have any agency or even the normal range of human thoughts and emotions. Such a skewed perspective not only disserves Africa, it also badly disserves the news viewing and news reading public.

We have taken the initiative of writing to you because we are mindful of the reach of 60 Minutes, and of the important role that your program has long played in informing the public. We are equally mindful that American views of Africa, a continent of 1.1 billion people, which is experiencing rapid change on an immense scale, are badly misinformed by much of the mainstream media. The great diversity of African experience, the challenges and triumphs of African peoples, and above all, the voices and thoughts of Africans themselves are chronically and woefully underrepresented.

Over the coming decades, Africa will become the backdrop of some of the most significant developments on the planet, from unprecedented population growth, urbanization and economic change to, potentially, the wholesale reconfiguration of states. We would like see to 60 Minutes rethink its approach to Africa, and rise to the challenge of covering topics like these, and many more, that go well beyond the bailiwick of the staid and stereotypical recent examples cited above. In doing so, 60 Minutes will have much to gain, as will the viewing public.

Howard W. French

Associate Professor, Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism

Author of China’s Second Continent and A Continent for the Taking: The Tragedy and Hope of Africa


LeglizHemp - 5/7/2015 at 09:26 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/05/08/health/weeks-after-his-recovery-ebola-lur ked-in-a-doctors-eye.html?_r=0

Weeks After His Recovery, Ebola Lurked in a Doctor’s Eye
By DENISE GRADY MAY 7, 2015

ATLANTA — When he was released from Emory University Hospital in October after a long, brutal fight with Ebola that nearly ended his life, Dr. Ian Crozier’s medical team thought he was cured. But less than two months later, he was back at the hospital with fading sight, intense pain and soaring pressure in his left eye.

Test results were chilling: The inside of Dr. Crozier’s eye was teeming with Ebola.

His doctors were amazed. They had considered the possibility that the virus had invaded his eye, but they had not really expected to find it. Months had passed since Dr. Crozier became ill while working in an Ebola treatment ward in Sierra Leone as a volunteer for the World Health Organization. By the time he left Emory, his blood was Ebola-free. Although the virus may persist in semen for months, other body fluids were thought to be clear of it once a patient recovered. Almost nothing was known about the ability of Ebola to lurk inside the eye.

Despite the infection within his eye, Dr. Crozier’s tears and the surface of his eye were virus-free, so he posed no risk to anyone who had casual contact with him.

More than a year after the epidemic in West Africa was recognized, doctors are still learning about the course of the disease and its lingering effects on survivors. Information about the aftermath of Ebola has been limited because past outbreaks were small: no more than a few hundred cases, often with death rates of 50 percent to 80 percent. But now, with at least 10,000 survivors in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, patterns are emerging.

Dr. Crozier, 44, ruefully calls himself a poster child for “post-Ebola syndrome”: Besides eye trouble, he has had debilitating joint and muscle pain, deep fatigue and hearing loss. Similar problems are being reported in West Africa, but it is not clear how common, severe or persistent they are. There have even been reports of survivors left completely blind or deaf, but these accounts are anecdotal and unconfirmed.

Doctors say the eye problems, because they threaten sight, are the most worrisome part of the syndrome and most urgently need attention. Dr. Crozier’s condition, uveitis — a dangerous inflammation inside the eye — has also been diagnosed in West Africans who survived Ebola.

At the height of the epidemic, health workers were too overwhelmed with the sick to worry much about survivors. But as the outbreak wanes, the World Health Organization has begun to gather information to help those who have not fully recovered, said Dr. Daniel Bausch, a senior consultant to the W.H.O. and an infectious-disease specialist at Tulane University. He added that the reports of eye trouble were of particular concern.

“It’s a major thing we need to study and provide support for,” Dr. Bausch said. But there are hardly any ophthalmologists in West Africa, and only they have the skills and equipment to diagnose conditions like uveitis that affect the inner chambers of the eye.

At ELWA Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia, run by the missionary group SIM, Dr. John Fankhauser, the medical director, said chronic pain, headaches and eye trouble were the most common physical problems among the hundred or so people attending a special clinic for Ebola survivors. Some have such severe pain that they find it hard to walk, he said. About 40 percent have eye pain, inflammation, blurred vision and blind spots in their visual fields. Some have uveitis.

“We’re seeing symptoms in patients who’ve been out of the treatment unit for up to nine months,” Dr. Fankhauser said. “They’re still very severe and impacting their life every day.” These patients will need medical care for months and maybe years, he predicted.

Dr. Fankhauser said he hoped that specialists in ophthalmology, rheumatology and rehabilitation medicine would visit.

“If they see enough patients, they can help us with the trends of what they are seeing, and that may help direct some of our therapy in the future, even after the team’s gone,” he said.

In Sierra Leone, the picture is much the same, according to Dr. John S. Schieffelin, a physician from the Tulane University School of Medicine who volunteered there. He said a strong, well-organized survivor group met regularly in Kenema.

“The main problems they’re telling me about are lots of body and joint pains, chronic headaches and women who stopped having menstrual periods, and for some it’s been several months,” Dr. Schieffelin said. “There’s quite a bit of vision problems.”

He added, “I have met one former patient that does appear to be deaf.”

The hearing loss could result from brain inflammation or very low blood pressure for an extended period, both caused by Ebola, Dr. Schieffelin said.

When Dr. Crozier’s eye trouble began, he and the Emory team suspected that Ebola had weakened his immune system and left him vulnerable to some other virus that had invaded his eye, maybe one that would be treatable with an antiviral drug.

So Dr. Steven Yeh, an ophthalmologist, pierced Dr. Crozier’s eye with a hair-thin needle, drew a few drops of fluid from its inner chamber and sent them to the lab. The results came as a shock.

For Dr. Crozier, it was deeply unsettling to learn that he was still occupied by something that seemed alien and malevolent. “It felt almost personal that the virus could be in my eye without me knowing it,” he said.

Uveitis had been reported in some Ebola survivors from previous outbreaks, and a related virus, Marburg, had been recovered from one patient’s eye. But those cases had seemed uncommon.

A report about Dr. Crozier’s eye condition was published on Thursday in The New England Journal of Medicine.

The inside of the eye is mostly shielded from the immune system to prevent inflammation that could damage vision. The barriers are not fully understood, but they include tightly packed cells in minute blood vessels that keep out certain cells and molecules, along with unique biological properties that inhibit the immune system. But this protection, called immune privilege, can sometimes turn the inner eye into a sanctuary for viruses, where they can replicate unchecked. The testes are also immune-privileged, which is why Ebola can persist in semen for months.

Finding Ebola in Dr. Crozier’s eye threw his doctors off balance. Dr. Yeh had worn a protective gown and one pair of gloves but no mask when he drew the fluid. Doctors wear more protective gear when treating patients known to have Ebola. He could not rule out the possibility that he had been infected, so he slept in the guest room at home and avoided touching his infant son for three weeks, the incubation period of the disease.

Another concern was the examining room where Dr. Yeh had taken the fluid sample. As soon as they got the results, he and several Emory colleagues rushed back there, verified that no one else had used the room, and disinfected every surface.

Additional tests showed that Dr. Crozier’s tears and the outer surface of his eye were Ebola-free, so he posed no danger to others. But his case suggests that doctors performing eye surgery on Ebola survivors could be at risk. It is not known how long the virus can persist within the eye.

The big question was whether the doctors could save Dr. Crozier’s sight. They worried about both eyes, because ailments in one eye can sometimes spread to the other. But there was no antiviral drug proven to work against Ebola, and even if there were, there was no precedent for treating an eye full of the virus.

In addition, the severe inflammation suggested that the barriers that normally protect the eye from the immune system had been breached. So what was damaging Dr. Crozier’s eye? The virus, the inflammation or both? They could not be sure.

The usual treatment for inflammation is steroids. But they can make an infection worse.

“What if it unleashed the virus?” Dr. Crozier said. “We were on a tightrope.”

Maybe an experimental antiviral drug would help, the doctors thought.

Though Dr. Crozier was the patient, he was also part of his own medical team, and his focus on the scientific details helped counter his mounting fear that he was going blind.

As he and his physicians struggled to balance treating the inflammation with fighting the infection, his eyesight continued to deteriorate. They tried high doses of a steroid, prednisone. The drug caused mood swings like a teenager’s, ravenous hunger, weight gain, high blood pressure and insomnia. And still his sight worsened. It was like looking through brambles, he said. He reached a point where all he could see was movement when Dr. Yeh waggled his fingers.

He also had significant hearing loss on the same side. “The whole left side of your life is gone,” he said. “It was a very dark and depressing time.”

He spent Christmas in the hospital with his younger brother Mark, who had stayed with him constantly throughout his illness and recovery.

The pressure inside his eye, which had been dangerously elevated, began to drop — too much. The eye became doughy to the touch, as if it were turning to mush.

“The eye felt dead to me,” Dr. Crozier said.

The biggest shock came one morning about 10 days after his symptoms started, when he glanced in the mirror and saw that his eye had actually changed color. His iris, normally bright blue, had turned a vivid green. Rarely, severe viral infections can cause such a color change, and it is usually permanent.

“It was like an assault,” he said. “It was so personal.”

As the days passed with no sign of improvement, Dr. Crozier and the Emory team began to think he had little to lose. Dr. Jay Varkey, an infectious-disease specialist who had handled much of Dr. Crozier’s care, got special permission from the Food and Drug Administration to use an experimental antiviral drug taken in pill form. (The doctors declined to name it, preferring to save that information for future publication in a medical journal.) They were not even sure that the drug would find its way into Dr. Crozier’s eye.

To add to the treatment for inflammation, Dr. Yeh also gave Dr. Crozier a steroid injection above his eyeball that would slowly release the drug into his eye.

At first, there seemed to be no effect. But one morning a week or so later, Dr. Crozier realized that if he turned his head this way and that, he could find “portals” and “wormholes” through the obstructions in his eye and could see his brother Mark, who was sitting on the end of his bed.

Gradually, over the next few months, his sight returned. Surprisingly, his eye turned blue again. A video shows him excitedly calling out letters on an eye chart as he works his way down to smaller and smaller type, with his brother and the doctors standing by, laughing.

Was it the antiviral drug? He cannot be sure, but he thinks so.

“I think the cure was Ian’s own immune system,” Dr. Varkey said, explaining that he suspected the treatments had reduced Dr. Crozier’s symptoms and helped preserve his sight long enough for his immune system to kick in and clear out the virus — just as supportive care during the worst phase of his initial illness had kept him alive until his natural defenses could take over.

Dr. Crozier believes information from his case may help prevent blindness in Ebola survivors in West Africa. On April 9, he headed to Liberia with Dr. Yeh and several other Emory physicians to see patients who had recovered from Ebola and examine their eyes.

“Maybe we can change the natural history of the disease for survivors,” Dr. Crozier said. “I want to start that conversation.”


LeglizHemp - 5/9/2015 at 11:51 AM

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-32671520

Liberia declared Ebola-free after weeks of no cases


LeglizHemp - 6/12/2015 at 02:22 AM

http://www.cnn.com/2015/06/11/health/who-ebola-cases/index.html

Dozens of new Ebola cases reported in West Africa
By Catherine E. Shoichet, CNN
Updated 7:46 PM ET, Thu June 11, 2015

(CNN)It seemed like the number of people contracting Ebola in West Africa was on the decline. But now, officials say that trend has stalled, with dozens of new cases of the deadly virus reported so far this month.

Last week, there were 31 new cases of Ebola reported in a growing geographic area in Guinea and Sierra Leone, the World Health Organization said. At the beginning of this week, 14 additional cases were reported.

The latest figures mark the second straight week that the number of Ebola cases in West Africa has increased, officials said.

Investigators are working to trace how the latest cases of the disease were contracted, the WHO said.

"The outbreak is not over and the response efforts must be sustained until we get to zero cases throughout the region and are able to stay at zero for several months," the U.N. Mission for Ebola Emergency Response said Thursday.

Last month, officials from the WHO declared Liberia free of the disease. But even as they trumpeted the news, officials warned that outbreaks in Guinea and Sierra Leone ran the risk of bringing the virus back to Liberia, where more than 4,000 people died after contracting Ebola.

CNN's Debra Goldschmidt and Azadeh Ansari contributed to this report.


LeglizHemp - 10/7/2015 at 09:58 PM

http://www.bbc.com/news/world-africa-34471234

Ebola countries record first week with no new cases

The three West African countries at the heart of the Ebola epidemic recorded their first week with no new cases since the outbreak began in March 2014.
The outbreak has so far killed more than 11,000 people in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, according to the World Health Organisation (WHO).
New cases have fallen sharply in 2015, but the WHO has warned that the disease could break out again.
The epidemic is the worst known occurrence of Ebola in history.
More than 500 people believed to have had dangerous contact with an Ebola patient remain under follow-up in Guinea, the WHO said in a report.
It also said several "high-risk" people linked to recent patients in Guinea and Sierra Leone had been lost track of.
Liberia has already been declared free of the disease after 42 days without a new case. It is the second time the country received the declaration, following a flare-up in June.
Sierra Leone released its last known Ebola patients on 28 September and must now wait to be declared free of the disease.
Guinea's most recent cases were recorded on 27 September.


LeglizHemp - 11/6/2015 at 01:43 PM

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/07/world/africa/the-last-place-on-earth-with -ebola-guineas-fight-to-get-to-zero.html?_r=0


LeglizHemp - 5/12/2017 at 02:36 PM

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/new-ebola-drc-one-dead_us_5915bd0be4b00 f308cf4acf9?3o&ncid=inblnkushpmg00000009

At Least 1 Person Dead From New Ebola Outbreak In Democratic Republic Of Congo
A total of nine cases have been reported in the country so far.


LeglizHemp - 5/20/2018 at 07:20 PM

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/18/world/africa/who-ebola-outbreak.html


LeglizHemp - 8/25/2018 at 04:17 AM

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ebola-outbreak-congo-health-care-worke rs_us_5b7f0b56e4b0348585fecab5


LeglizHemp - 9/6/2018 at 12:18 PM

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/world-health-organization-ebola-congo- warning_us_5b9022cfe4b0162f47296009

HEALTH 09/05/2018 10:52 pm ET Updated 8 hours ago
World Health Organization: After Ebola Death In City, ‘No One Should Be Sleeping Well Tonight’
Experts worry the outbreak could escalate after a woman died in Butembo, a city of about 1 million people in the Democratic Republic of Congo.


LeglizHemp - 9/25/2018 at 08:04 PM

https://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/ebola-drc-congo-perfect-storm-who_us_5 baa6616e4b0f143d10ddff9

The current Ebola outbreak in the Democratic Republic of Congo, already the seventh largest in history, is on the verge of spinning out of control, the World Health Organization said Tuesday.


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