Thread: Interview with Galadrielle

steved - 9/4/2019 at 07:59 PM

https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/episode-9-please-be-me-song-for-my-fa ther-duane-allman/id1467840963?i=1000446305022

This is a real nice interview with Galadrielle talking about her book Please Be with Me. It is a great book IMHO.

See mentions a special project for her fathers 75th birthday next year. Can't wait to learn more about that.

[Edited on 9/4/2019 by steved]


pops42 - 9/4/2019 at 10:59 PM

Thanks for that!.


bluedad - 9/5/2019 at 03:46 PM

Very Nice....


dzobo - 9/5/2019 at 06:38 PM

So well-spoken. Matches her dad's intensity and way with words. Had not heard about the on-going struggle to secure royalties for the Layla album. Clapton apparently not very giving on the issue.


pops42 - 9/5/2019 at 08:03 PM

quote:
So well-spoken. Matches her dad's intensity and way with words. Had not heard about the on-going struggle to secure royalties for the Layla album. Clapton apparently not very giving on the issue.
Greedy ****


owencarol - 9/8/2019 at 10:09 PM

She wrote a great book about her dad and his music. This is a fine interview. It's difficult to believe that he would be 74. What an incredible legacy he left. Her love for her dad is apparent and deeply felt.


PeachNutt - 9/9/2019 at 01:07 AM

We know there is a video documentary about Duane Allman being worked on which is discussed in an interview with John McDermott and Eddie Kramer about the Jimi Hendrix Electric Ladayland box set. It's discussed at about 23:00minutes into the interview.

[Edited on 9/9/2019 by PeachNutt]


bobkaufman - 9/10/2019 at 01:12 PM

thanks for posting, very nice


Chain - 9/11/2019 at 08:32 PM

quote:
So well-spoken. Matches her dad's intensity and way with words. Had not heard about the on-going struggle to secure royalties for the Layla album. Clapton apparently not very giving on the issue.


I wasn't aware of this royalty issue. I find it amazing that someone as wealthy as Eric Clapton can't see his way toward some financial agreement with Duane's daughter.

I could be wrong but I assume the royalties she's seeking are performance royalties and not publishing royalties? I say this because I assume, perhaps incorrectly, that Duane technically didn't write the music but only "performed" on the album and is thus entitled to the relatively new performance royalties created by a court settlement from many years ago pertaining to such royalties for many musicians going back years who played on countless albums. Or do I have that completely backward?

Anyway, I'm curious as to what type of royalties they're actually in disagreement over.

[Edited on 9/11/2019 by Chain]


blackey - 9/11/2019 at 11:43 PM

I'd like to find out too. There use to a band royalty the band members would split. On a solo album the artist usually got that and the other musicians were payed for their work in the studio. It could be Derek and the Dominos as a band didnt split the royalties with Duane.

The most lucrative royalty is for song writing. If the Rolling Stones cover one of your songs on a multiplatinum album, it would make you wealthy.

I'm not sure how the band royalty for the ABB works on the Capricorn albums. In 1991 Polygram released 1969 to 1979 a Decade of Hits which featured tracks off Capricorn records by the Allman Brothers and it sold over 2 million albums and it got Butch Trucks upset. Butch began posting about that best hits release here on this board when the CD sold over a million copies and Butch complained that Gregg and Dickey were making millions and he (Butch) was getting NOTHING! Butch complained he wrote the drum parts for Liz Reed and Dickey wouldn't share a writing credit so he went to Duane and Duane disappointingly said whoever brings the song to the band gets the writing credit even after the band makes changes to it. Butch said Berry Oakley wrote the bass intro which is so famous and Butch himself came up with a the time signature for Whipping Post and didnt get a writing credit.

I'm sure there was a band royalty the band split from album sales. Gregg said Duane got a nice royalty check for Fillmore East just before he was killed and just as the money began pouring in his brother was gone. He got cheated. Duane got a writing credit for Hot 'Lanta but I'm guessing his royalty was for more than that.

But by 1991 the band wasn't getting anything, an artist royalty, on the Capricorn stuff. Only the writers.


PeachNutt - 9/12/2019 at 12:55 AM

I belieive the Duane and Derek & The Domino's issues or litagation is ongoing for more than 15years.... really a shame and too bad. Duane's estate really should be getting something significant from the Layla album.


Billastro - 9/13/2019 at 05:45 PM

Regardless of the legal issues, it seems to me that this is a matter of conscience. By all accounts, Derek and the Dominos were falling apart, and Duane was the catalyst that united and energized them (notice my famous gift for understatement ). Without him, they likely would have been a footnote in Eric's history.

Ironically, there's a story / rumor that when Cream recorded Skip James' "I'm so Glad", Eric made sure that the record company paid royalties to Skip's widow.

Times change, I guess.

Billastro


Chain - 9/14/2019 at 12:41 AM

quote:
Regardless of the legal issues, it seems to me that this is a matter of conscience. By all accounts, Derek and the Dominos were falling apart, and Duane was the catalyst that united and energized them (notice my famous gift for understatement ). Without him, they likely would have been a footnote in Eric's history.

Ironically, there's a story / rumor that when Cream recorded Skip James' "I'm so Glad", Eric made sure that the record company paid royalties to Skip's widow.

Times change, I guess.

Billastro


Similar to the mention of the Creme recording above, I remember reading years ago an interview with Eddie Van Halen in which he mentioned that one of the coolest things about hitting it relatively big with the release of Van Halen I and its subsequent blockbuster sales was personally delivering a very substantial royalty check to the elder gentleman who wrote the song "Ice Cream Man."

As VH fans know, that tune was not only on the first hugely successful album, but it also was released as a single and got significant radio play thus earning the writer a very fat payday. I recall Eddie saying what a thrill it was to personally hand deliver the first check to on otherwise down on his luck elder gentleman.

I think EVH also mentioned in the interview that this gentleman opened a bbq joint with some of the funds. I would suspect this gentleman has long since passed, but he was probably shocked as hell to see this skinny, pale faced, young dude knocking at his door holding a check with his name on it for thousands of dollars....


fender31 - 9/15/2019 at 11:53 AM

Can't blame Butch for being upset, Drummers have been getting screwed over for years on royalties. But maybe Butch should of wrote some songs, he criticized Gregg's queen of hearts when Gregg wanted it to be on a ABB studio album.


blackey - 9/15/2019 at 04:49 PM

I don't have any idea what Butch actually thought of Queen of Hearts after it came out of Laid Back. I think it's a great song. One of Gregg's best and would have made Brothers and Sisters even better. I imagine Chuck Leavell would have soloed during the fine sax solo on Laid Back.

But it is somewhat clear to this old fan that Butch was irritated at Gregg during the Brothers and Sisters sessions for being too drunk to play several times including when he tried to present the song Queen of Hearts to the ABB. Later during the 1975 sessions for Win, Loose or Draw, Butch became even more irritated at Gregg for failing to show for rehearsals and recording sessions. Gregg was involved with Cher out in LA and just refused to come to Macon. Gregg also was still aggravated about Queen of Hearts and apparently it was a sore spot with Gregg the rest of his life.

Butch eventually was quoted in the press " You can't count on Gregg for anything". Butch himself began not showing up and when Dickey was ready to record a few songs, Johnny Sandlin couldn't find Butch. So he and Bill Stewart played the drums on some songs on WLD. Don't know why Johnny didn't bring in Jaimoe buy Johnny did take the tapes to Los Angeles and got Gregg in the studio out there to add his parts.

In Gregg's book he admits he was wrong for staying in LA during the sessions but did say being in the band and dealing with that album were miserable experiences for him at the time. Brothers and Sisters made the band the most popular band in America. But Win, Loose or Draw was a letdown for Capricorn and the fans and all those millions of new fans that made Brothers and Sisters number one for five weeks and selling over 4 million copies, dropped off and the ABB was never again a super star band and never again had a new album to sell over a million copies. The last one, Hitting The Note, sold about 200,000.

Let me be clear though. I don't buy albums because the sell well. Some titles I bought over the years and enjoy sold only a few thousand.


blackey - 9/16/2019 at 01:54 PM

Someone Emailed me that the 2004 live One Way Out was their last new record release and that is correct. I heard it sold about 50 thousand. Not much but better than Peakin' at the Beacon in 2000 which was their last new album for Epic.

You know after their commercial peak with Brothers and Sisters, the ABB was kinda like the Dead. Albums sell just so-so but the shows do very well in ticket sales.


This thread come from : Hittin' The Web with the Allman Brothers Band
http://allmanbrothersband.com/

Url of this website:
http://allmanbrothersband.com//modules.php?op=modload&name=XForum&file=viewthread&fid=126&tid=148569