Thread: What are your jazz recommendations?

Skydog32103 - 6/3/2019 at 05:53 PM

I’m new to jazz. I know Miles Davis’ “Kind of Blue” from all the hype it gets, but what else should I explore? What songs, albums, and artists would a fellow Allmans fan like? Thanks in advance for your help.


BrerRabbit - 6/3/2019 at 06:16 PM

John Coltrane! You're already there with Kind of Blue, so maybe im stating the obvious. Great place to start is "A Love Supreme", stay pre-1965 until you are done with your astronaut training.


MartinD28 - 6/3/2019 at 06:51 PM

There are so many variations of jazz, it's hard to pick out an "A" list.

I've always enjoyed fusion so a logical choice might be Spyro Gyra. Also Some of the early Jeff Lorber tunes were pretty neat.

If you like a bit more abstract, there's Pharoah Sanders.

Pleasant on the ears - Lonnie Liston Smith.


blackey - 6/3/2019 at 08:12 PM

Jack Teagarden. Jack Teagarden was the most influential trombone player ever. Several good videos on You Tube.

You Tube for Harry James with Buddy Rich on drums.

Harry James have been one of the greatest trumpet players in the world as Buddy Rich on several occasions stated he (Buddy) had played with greatest musicians in the world.

Another video I recently discovered is The Bobcats with Bob Havens and Yank Lawson. Havens is a master on trombone and Yank was one of the best trumpet players in history.


islalala - 6/3/2019 at 08:49 PM

Herbie Hancock's Maiden Voyage is a great place to start. Butch talked about the brothers listening to that one back in the day. It's straight ahead with a few little twists, but moreover is timeless - like it could have come out of any period in history and still sound as if it just got released.




stormyrider - 6/3/2019 at 09:19 PM

in addition to what's mentioned;

Charlie Parker - practically invented be-bop along with Dizzy Gillespie. Essential listening
ETA Kind of Bird was dedicated to him

Thelonious Monk - can't really describe him, very interesting harmonies. His compositions are among the most covered in jazz. I even heard a Monk Tease at an acoustic Hot Tuna concert

Wes Montgomery - one of my favorite jazz guitar players. Duane's solo on Liz Reed from Stony Brook 1970 (bootleg recording) borrows from Wes

[Edited on 6/4/2019 by stormyrider]


JimSheridan - 6/3/2019 at 10:25 PM

I'd say keep working on the Miles catalogue. His different line-ups had wildly different sounds, each worth checking out.

Herbie Hancock's solo stuff is indeed very cool, from his non-electric stuff from the early 1960s to his very electric material from the late 60s early 70s. That Headhunters album is a big one.

I love Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album. Great fusion, basically the thing that spurred Jeff Beck into his fusion period.


Southernfan - 6/3/2019 at 10:41 PM

Weather Report!


leafsfan - 6/3/2019 at 10:57 PM

I'm dipping my toes into different Jazz music pools these days as well.

I like the Duke, Count Basie, The Quintet Live at Massey Hall is an amazing recording, Charlie Parker, Coltrane, so much out there.

The Ken Burns Jazz Doc. is a great resource.


clarkmg - 6/3/2019 at 10:59 PM

Pat Methany Group
First album and American Garage


thetoweringfool - 6/3/2019 at 11:17 PM

Ahhh jazz...has become a near obsession for me. I’m my 38th year...easily my favorite genre, particularly since The Brothers are no more. Anyway...so tough to say. Jazz has SO MANY faces...but if ur starting out, steer clear of the avant-garde (which I like). Some great recommendations so far but A Love Supreme may overwhelm?, idk... Trane is Gold-standard stuff so I’d say maybe start w ‘SoulTrane’, ‘My Favorite Things’, ‘Giant Steps.’ This is Derek Trucks’ soul stuff... that said...when you’re ready; ALove Supreme IS one of the greatest works of art of all time. We’re looking for accessibility...stay away from Pharoah, for now. I know you’ve heard of Bitches Brew...stay away. It’s a masterpiece, but get to know ‘Someday my Prince will Come’, Seven Steps to Heaven and Nefertiti first. When you’re ready for electric guitar Miles...get ‘Jack Johnson’. John McLaughlin is absolutely brilliant on this album and it’s far more accessible than ‘ Bitches Brew’ or even In A Silent Way. As far as absolute perfection and the definition of “ESSENTIAL”...Cannonball Adderlly: Something Else” is absolutely mind-blowing. Since ur an ABB guy....seek out Wes Montgomery, Charlie Christian, Django Reinhardt, Grant Green, Joe Pass and Jim Hall.


StratDal - 6/4/2019 at 12:12 AM

If you have iTunes Radio, check out Jazz Radio Pure. It's commercial free and it plays great stuff all over the board.

Anything Jimmy "Hammond Organ" Smith or Wes Montgomery (guitar) for starters. There's even album or two of them collaborating.

I really started enjoying jazz about 10 years ago. Great to listen to while surfing the net. Cheers!

[Edited on 6/4/2019 by StratDal]


50split - 6/4/2019 at 03:21 AM

django and grapelli
larry young
joe pass
art tatum
chet baker


EnglishDarren - 6/4/2019 at 08:36 AM

Late Live Chet Baker
Mulligan Baker live at Carniegie Hall with John Schofield on guitar
Jaco Pastorious/Weather Report
Miles Davis Bitches Brew/Sketches of Spain
Head Hunters


ScottC - 6/4/2019 at 12:34 PM

If you like piano trios (piano, bass, drums) then
Bill Evans - The Complete Village Vanguard Recordings, 1961
Keith Jarrett - At The Blue Note, The Complete Recordings

Bill Evans plays piano on all of Kind of Blue except "Freddie Freeloader" and wrote the liner notes to the original LP. One of the best bands ever - Miles, Coltrane, Cannonball Adderley & Bill Evans.

For Miles' mid-late '60s quintet (Herbie Hancock, Tony Williams, Wayne Shorter, Ron Carter), I recommend "The Complete Live at the Plugged Nickel 1965".


njpaulc - 6/4/2019 at 02:19 PM

Don't forget the Swing Era, Benny Goodman is a good listen, His Big Band, Trio, Quartet, and Sextet feature great musicians and great performances. His Live at Carnegie Hall album is a classic and is considered one of the most important performances in jazz .


dimplesjbc - 6/4/2019 at 03:18 PM

Lots of excellent suggestions, here are a couple more .
Stanley Turrentine ‘’ Sugar ‘’
Freddie Hubbard “ Ready For Freddie “
Both these legends have plenty of great music but these are two I really enjoy . Speaking of jazz , when the wife and I were in NYC for an ABB run we caught Johnny Griffin ( The Little Giant ) doing a rare show at the Blue Note , what a thrill that was .


dzobo - 6/4/2019 at 04:27 PM

Others not mentioned-

Art Blakey (drummer) led groups (he is considered the mentor of a huge number of jazz greats)
Lee Morgan (trumpet)
Wynton Marsalis (trumpet)
John Schofield (modern guitarist who sat in with ABB)
Branford Marsalis (sax)

Pat Metheny and Jimmy Smith were two entry level guys for me

And just a note on Pharoah Sanders. He has some very listenable items in his 90's catalogue including Crescent with Love and Welcome to Love.


clarkmg - 6/4/2019 at 04:31 PM

If you're looking for something on the funky side with Duane, try Herbie Mann's Push Push.


tcatanesi - 6/4/2019 at 05:23 PM

Art Pepper Meets the Rhythm Section
Bill Evans Trio But Beautiful
Bill Evans Waltz for Debby
Cannonball Adderly Somethin' Else
The Dave Brubeck Quartet Time Out
Oscar Peterson Trio On The Town
Dexter Gordon Go!

Enjoy!


cmgst34 - 6/4/2019 at 05:29 PM

There is a relatively new release called "Final Tour" from the last tour of when John Coltrane was in Miles Davis' group.

i am not a huge jazz-head, but i cannot stop listening to the release. it is awesome, and you can really feel the tension.

I won't try to review it, the articles by the pros you can find easily enough on the internet, just google "final tour." But, i highly recommend it. There is a one-record LP out, but if you have full Spotify, there is maybe a 4-CD set on Spotify that is really worth the listen.


Shavian - 6/5/2019 at 09:04 AM

Jazz is such a wide ranging genre that I'm always reluctant to make recommendations to anyone.

For example, looking at the above posts, a newcomer could end up sampling Pat Metheny or Pharaoh Sanders!

As thetoweringfool suggests, Sanders is for your passing-out parade and not your induction day.

My advice would be to start off by listening to jazz on radio or Spotify. If you hear something you like, maybe check out some bargain discs or samplers.

Most of the greats started off with someone else's big band. Investigate who they went on to play with. It's like a vine which spreads out from the original source - one style or artist leads to another.





[Edited on 6/5/2019 by Shavian]


amyjared - 6/5/2019 at 02:47 PM

Some excellent advice on here! I was lucky enough to see many of these folks in concert: Dexter Gordon, Brandford, Miles, etc.
All great!
I just wanted to put another plug in for Grant Green. His guitar work is beautiful and his albums are such a pleasure to listen to.


BrerRabbit - 6/5/2019 at 05:24 PM

quote:
There is a relatively new release called "Final Tour" from the last tour of when John Coltrane was in Miles Davis' group.


Thanks for the recommend - just ordered this, looks excellent.


Skydog32103 - 6/5/2019 at 06:09 PM

This is all fantastic information. A big thanks to everyone who posted. I can’t wait to dive into it. Now the plan is to try out these new tunes on my new Sony noise cancellation headphones. This will be a fun “project”.


blackey - 6/5/2019 at 07:23 PM

Also check out Chick Webb. Ella Fitzgerald was in his band when she was young.

Buddy Rich said Chick Webb was a great drummer and one of his influences.

In the 1970's Buddy Rich year after year would lead the Drummer World best drummer readers poll.
Steve Gadd, John Bonham, Keith Moon were among the rock band drummers below Buddy Rich usually in the top 25. Butch Trucks and Jaimoe never made the cut that I can remember. Jaimoe on Standback on Eat A Peach should have gotten Jaimoe on that poll.

There are several ABB album tracks that have only Butch on drums. But Standback is the only one with just Jaimoe on drums. Butch said that was his idea as he thought Jaimoe's style was perfect for the song and Butch wanted, if you will, Jaimoe play lead drums. Butch decided to just play percussion on that track.

Back in 1972 during the 5 man band tour, we use to hear Standback was originally an instrumental Berry Oakley came up with he called The Road To Calico. Gregg got hold of it, wrote some changes and lyrics and it became Standback. Oakley shares the writing credit with Gregg on that. And the album sold over 1 million copies. Oakley had to be making $$$ off that but sadly as Butch said, he just lost his desire to live in 1972 if it was to be in a world that didn't have Duane Allman in it

Dickey could be moody and a loner back then but Dickey was so close to Duane and Berry. When the original band played, Duane, Dickey and Berry were the ones making eye contact and making gestures to each other and often would form a simi circle. And Butch's eyes usually stayed locked on them. By December 1972 my how that band had changed.


Boglo - 6/5/2019 at 09:31 PM

quote:
John Coltrane! You're already there with Kind of Blue, so maybe im stating the obvious. Great place to start is "A Love Supreme"


Last night the Los Angeles High School Jazz Band opened up the Dead & Company show at the Hollywood Bowl by playing John Coltrane's "A Love Supreme" with the band that segued into Shakedown Street. Really, really awesome!


owencarol - 6/6/2019 at 01:51 PM

Miles and Coltrane have gotten a lot of reccomendations and justly so. You might consider Cannonball Aderley, Chet Baker (mentioned previously) and Wayne Shorter just to give you a couple of more avenues to pursue. Enjoy!


The_Newt - 6/8/2019 at 03:42 AM

Pat Metheny, Jaco, John McLaughlin, Miles Davis, Coltrane, Bill Evans, Wayne Shorter, Sonny Rollins, and Thelonious Monk.


yankweed1 - 6/8/2019 at 11:39 PM

HELP HELP ive been loistening to jazz music since the late 60.s.. have enoyed so manty artists and live shows. to small clubs... MY SUGGESTION GO TO PANDORA.. AND TRY DIFFERENT TYPES... CLASSIC JAZZ... ACOUSTIC JAZZ. BIG BAND JAZZ.. PUT IN AN ARTIST .. MILES DAVIS,,, JOHN COLTRANE...CHICK COREA.. OSCAR PETERSON ETC AND JUST LISTEN . LISTEN


74Jer - 6/9/2019 at 03:19 AM

Three albums I just purchased on vinyl come to mind.

Kind of Blue - Miles Davis
Idle Moments - Grant Green
Alone in San Francisco - Thelonious Monk

[Edited on 6/9/2019 by 74Jer]


DOVETAIL - 6/10/2019 at 11:40 PM

If you explored the discographies of just SOME of the musicians in Miles' bands from the late Fifties on---Evans, Hancock, Carter Williams, Coltrane, Corea, Jarrett, Holland, JUST TO NAME A FEW----you'd have a large and VERY diverse jazz collection in no time!


JimSheridan - 6/11/2019 at 12:01 AM

If you are old school like me, hit your local library. Our small town library has some GREAT jazz CDs. I go in there and grab a handful at a time to absorb. Anything on Blue Note from the late 50s early 60s is good!


DOVETAIL - 6/11/2019 at 11:29 AM

quote:
I'd say keep working on the Miles catalogue. His different line-ups had wildly different sounds, each worth checking out.

Herbie Hancock's solo stuff is indeed very cool, from his non-electric stuff from the early 1960s to his very electric material from the late 60s early 70s. That Headhunters album is a big one.

I love Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album. Great fusion, basically the thing that spurred Jeff Beck into his fusion period.


As Beck tells it himself in the "Still On The Run" doc, it was hearing Mahavishnu Orchestra that convinced him to go instrumental.


emr - 6/11/2019 at 02:39 PM

quote:
quote:
I'd say keep working on the Miles catalogue. His different line-ups had wildly different sounds, each worth checking out.

Herbie Hancock's solo stuff is indeed very cool, from his non-electric stuff from the early 1960s to his very electric material from the late 60s early 70s. That Headhunters album is a big one.

I love Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album. Great fusion, basically the thing that spurred Jeff Beck into his fusion period.


As Beck tells it himself in the "Still On The Run" doc, it was hearing Mahavishnu Orchestra that convinced him to go instrumental.


I love Mahavishnu "Inner Mounting Flame" Have a friend who love music and it didn't work at all for him. They are a yes/no type of music

and re: what to listen to when asked to describe Jazz Louis Armstrong said: "If you have to ask the question you won't understand the answer."

Personally I just moved (downsized) and sold my record collection; the valuable part of which were c 1950's - 1960's Jazz Records I had bought in High School from my brothers girlfriend's mother (ex husband was a downbeat DJ). Didn't throw vinyl on that often - but missing my kids soetimes


leafsfan - 6/11/2019 at 04:13 PM

My .02 is to stay away from anything with Vibes. I hate that stuff.


Stephen - 6/11/2019 at 04:37 PM



[Edited on 6/12/2019 by Stephen]


JimSheridan - 6/12/2019 at 12:41 AM

Dovetail,

Billy Cobham was the drummer for the Mahavishnu Orchestra; Jan Hammer was the keyboardist. They are both on Cobham's amazing "Spectrum" album from 1973 when they both were still with Mahavishnu. The big difference is that the guitarist was Tommy Bolin, not John McLaughlin, and the album is funkier than Mahavishnu, not as extreme. Beck's work sounds much more like "Spectrum" than like "Inner Mounting Flame."

Here's a solid Beck explanation from a great Guitar Player article:

One person who, after hearing the album, experienced an epiphany that significantly altered the course of his career was Jeff Beck. “Spectrum changed my whole musical outlook,” he once explained. “(It) gave me new life at the time, on top of the Mahavishnu records. It represented a whole area that was as exciting to me as when I first heard ‘Hound Dog’ by Elvis Presley. They were so inspirational to me that I started to adopt that type of music. Tommy’s guitar playing on Spectrum is fantastic, while Jan can flatten you with the first few notes.” The album provided the impetus for Beck’s landmark Blow by Blow, Wired, and the formation of a long and fruitful musical alliance with Hammer, which turned out to be a marriage made in heaven.

https://www.guitarplayer.com/technique/under-investigation-billy-cobhams-sp ectrum


oldcoot - 6/12/2019 at 03:06 PM

quote:
Joey DeFrancesco did a CD with Bobby Hutcherson, Organic Vibes -- like it well, the blending of the 2 instruments works real nice -- always did dig Lionel Hampton

All the mentions, MahavishnuO, Spectrum, Herbie H, great -- Brain Transplant, Alphonse Mouzon, great fusion stuff -- a San Francisco record was mentioned, another is The Cannonball Adderly Quintet in San Francisco --

one of my faves along more along that line ('regular/classic'(?), not fusion ) -- is the Geri Allen Trio's 21 -- with Ron Carter & Tony Williams -- great 'be-bop' (?) - sounding jazz pianist

Friday Night in San Francisco -- another live one from SF -- McLaughlin, DeMeola & Paco De Lucia -- where does THAT one fall 'categorically' -- right into the ears

The duelling guitars of John McLaughlin & Carlos Santana on their cover of A Love Supreme -- amazing fiery stuff -- love their version

[Edited on 6/11/2019 by Stephen]



The Mouzon release is "Mind Transplant." Also features Tommy Bolin on guitar.


Stephen - 6/12/2019 at 08:38 PM

Apologies -- you're right to glean that one word out of my post, and highlight it
Yes, MIND Transplant -- tsk tsk -- and Tommy Bolin is on it? Hadn't known that

Organ Grinder Swing, Jimmy Smith
Full House, Wes Montgomery Live at Tsubo

2 other jazz albums, if recommendations is still the discussion

whoops, make that The Incredible Jimmy Smith with Kenny Burrell and Grady Tate


[Edited on 6/12/2019 by Stephen]


pops42 - 6/13/2019 at 03:14 AM

I saw The Buddy Rich show. W/guests like Gerry Mulligan, Stan Getz, Lionel Hampton and others. On PBS from 1982. Great stuff!


JimSheridan - 6/13/2019 at 03:17 AM

Alphonse Mouzon's "Mind Transplant" is a terrific album. It is almost the sequel to Billy Cobham's "Spectrum," giving Tommy Bolin more chances to shine. It is more hypnotic.

Mouzon was a monster drummer. If you can find any albums by Eleventh House, check them out. It wa Mouzon with Larry Coryell. Great fusion!!!


hotlantatim - 6/13/2019 at 01:38 PM

Kind of Blue is both incredible and accessible. Great starting point. I'd stay in the 1955-1965 to start.

Blue Note has some "best of" CDs that are a great band for the buck to pick up another half dozen. Get one from Lee Morgan, John Coletran, Art Blakely. 1960's Herbie Hancock.

Dave Brubeck Time Out (you'll recognize Take 5)

For some vocal stuff, Ella & Loius is a classic.

Stay with the accessible stuff to start before you head into the 1970s electric stuff.

And I find it better listening around the house than in the car for some reason. Enjoy!


JimSheridan - 6/13/2019 at 06:25 PM

hotlantatim wrote:
"Stay with the accessible stuff to start before you head into the 1970s electric stuff."

I half agree with this. Jazz from the 1950s in particular is very melodic and thus very accessible.

However.....my background is rock. Rock, rock, rock, rock. Guitar rock, blues rock, hard rock, heavy metal rock, jam rock. That was my gateway to jazz. Mainly, it was Jeff Beck's 70s instrumental stuff that then got me to Herbie Hancock and Mahavishnu. When I first started trying to listen to real jazz, Miles in particular, the lack of guitar in his 1950s stuff threw me off. Thus, for me, his electric stuff made more sense. "Bitches Brew" was and is a sprawl, but "Jack Johnson" and "In A Quiet Way" were right up my alley.


DOVETAIL - 6/13/2019 at 10:29 PM

quote:
Dovetail,

Billy Cobham was the drummer for the Mahavishnu Orchestra; Jan Hammer was the keyboardist. They are both on Cobham's amazing "Spectrum" album from 1973 when they both were still with Mahavishnu. The big difference is that the guitarist was Tommy Bolin, not John McLaughlin, and the album is funkier than Mahavishnu, not as extreme. Beck's work sounds much more like "Spectrum" than like "Inner Mounting Flame."

Here's a solid Beck explanation from a great Guitar Player article:

One person who, after hearing the album, experienced an epiphany that significantly altered the course of his career was Jeff Beck. “Spectrum changed my whole musical outlook,” he once explained. “(It) gave me new life at the time, on top of the Mahavishnu records. It represented a whole area that was as exciting to me as when I first heard ‘Hound Dog’ by Elvis Presley. They were so inspirational to me that I started to adopt that type of music. Tommy’s guitar playing on Spectrum is fantastic, while Jan can flatten you with the first few notes.” The album provided the impetus for Beck’s landmark Blow by Blow, Wired, and the formation of a long and fruitful musical alliance with Hammer, which turned out to be a marriage made in heaven.

https://www.guitarplayer.com/technique/under-investigation-billy-cobhams-sp ectrum


Well aware of the lineage you describe, Mr. Sheridan, and I note with great interest El Becko's reference to McLaughlin & co. in the quote!?


JimSheridan - 6/13/2019 at 11:46 PM

Totally. El Becko even toured with Mahavishnu. I think he was on a McLaughlin album in the early 2000s also.

However, I think Beck never sounded like Mahavishnu Orchestra but sounded a lot like Spectrum. The MO had strains of Indian and classical sounds, had violin, and had a big, precise, composed sound, whereas Spectrum was looser, bluesier, funkier, more playful. Those adjectives fit what Beck did.


DOVETAIL - 6/14/2019 at 12:09 AM

quote:
Totally. El Becko even toured with Mahavishnu. I think he was on a McLaughlin album in the early 2000s also.

However, I think Beck never sounded like Mahavishnu Orchestra but sounded a lot like Spectrum. The MO had strains of Indian and classical sounds, had violin, and had a big, precise, composed sound, whereas Spectrum was looser, bluesier, funkier, more playful. Those adjectives fit what Beck did.


And Jeff has played "Stratus" regularly for years (besides having guitarist Tommy Bolin and his band tour with him in 1976).


Fretsman - 6/14/2019 at 12:25 AM

Marcus King played Stratus in Brooklyn.....
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zbTUzViOuJ4


JimSheridan - 6/14/2019 at 02:07 AM

Indeed. The late lamented Tommy Bolin died tragically after opening for Jeff Beck in Miami, Dec 1976. Had he lived and gotten his act together, I think Tommy would have been like Beck, an eclectic genius. So sad.

Both Warren Haynes and Prince have tackled "Stratus" also. It is like fusion's own "Goin Down" in terms of many folks tackling it live.

Here is a treat - another great song on Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album is the song "Red Baron," and Derek got the chance to tackle it with Oteil and Kofi and friends:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7-lLoI7NJo


jimmyjam - 6/14/2019 at 02:23 AM

Anything from Miles Davis 1952 - 1972


DOVETAIL - 6/14/2019 at 08:52 PM

quote:
Indeed. The late lamented Tommy Bolin died tragically after opening for Jeff Beck in Miami, Dec 1976. Had he lived and gotten his act together, I think Tommy would have been like Beck, an eclectic genius. So sad.

Both Warren Haynes and Prince have tackled "Stratus" also. It is like fusion's own "Goin Down" in terms of many folks tackling it live.

Here is a treat - another great song on Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album is the song "Red Baron," and Derek got the chance to tackle it with Oteil and Kofi and friends:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7-lLoI7NJo

Bolin one of my ALL-TIME faves....I was fortunate enough to see him in September of '76.


JimSheridan - 6/16/2019 at 01:14 AM

Dovetail, spill the beans please! I'd love to hear more about that show.

I'm 52. I didn't hear any of his stuff until 1983, way too late. I got instantly hooked and have been obsessed ever since.


oldcoot - 6/16/2019 at 06:42 PM

quote:
Indeed. The late lamented Tommy Bolin died tragically after opening for Jeff Beck in Miami, Dec 1976. Had he lived and gotten his act together, I think Tommy would have been like Beck, an eclectic genius. So sad.

Both Warren Haynes and Prince have tackled "Stratus" also. It is like fusion's own "Goin Down" in terms of many folks tackling it live.

Here is a treat - another great song on Billy Cobham's "Spectrum" album is the song "Red Baron," and Derek got the chance to tackle it with Oteil and Kofi and friends:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l7-lLoI7NJo


Derek has joined Mule live on Stratus and during the last minute or so of Stratus they riff into Red Baron. Very nice indeed!

Also, it was back in 2003, I was hanging with Todd Smallie when the DTB was still together. That day they played Red Baron during their soundcheck.

It's also covered on a long ago tv show on BET, can't recall the name of the show, jazz musicians getting together in the studio, working out playing a song and then performing the finished project. Derek & Kofi were involved on that. I need to dig out the dvd!

(Found it. The program was Studio Jams, Derek & Kofi were on several episodes. The one with Red Baron also includes Oteil, Yonrico Scott, Vernon Reid and Jeff Coffin. Viewable on YouTube?)

[Edited on 6/16/2019 by oldcoot]


oldcoot - 6/16/2019 at 06:43 PM

quote:
Dovetail, spill the beans please! I'd love to hear more about that show.

I'm 52. I didn't hear any of his stuff until 1983, way too late. I got instantly hooked and have been obsessed ever since.


Lucked into seeing Tommy while he was in The James Gang. The draw was the headliner, Johnny Winter, but the James Gang was one of the opening bands that night.


shep66 - 6/18/2019 at 06:19 PM

In the same vein, but more on the rock side is Return to Forever. Jazz fusion at it's best.


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