Thread: Black Sabbath's Heaven And Hell - full album

StratDal - 5/10/2019 at 11:20 PM

Cool spin this May Gray (raining too; snow in the Sierra) Friday afternoon. Cheers!

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBzBwYhHpqLJhUSMJ7YiCnwQweplLxJR0


sckeys - 5/12/2019 at 02:47 AM

That’s cool. Takes me back to that “fued” that I read so much about in Hit Parader. I had them all and loved it. Ozzy with “Speak Of The Devil” and Sabbath had “Live Evil”. Good one Strat. Think I’ll twist one and take my jam box into the woods for some Metal.


jszfunk - 6/16/2019 at 01:44 PM

Thanks for this. It inspired me to make a Heaven and Hell playlist from
Live From Radio City Music Hall
https://youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_mFfBkT-Lbyym3KCMKffmNJX5nfhpvYB5g

Neon Nights 30 yrs of Heaven and Hell
https://.youtube.com/playlist?list=OLAK5uy_kPHkPw-oSzxqbNVI_SA6ooYm4aOQy5hq o

I also mixed in Past Lives, which I highly recommend and live stuff from the Gillan era too.




sixty8 - 6/19/2019 at 08:05 PM

I have often said that the break up of Black Sabbath at that time was really a blessing one of the best things to happen to hard rock/heavy metal as we got IMO two of the very best heavy metal albums of all time. Still love both of those records!


steadyhorse - 6/19/2019 at 11:56 PM

Heaven & Hell is one of my favorites, Ronnie Dio had a great run of albums, Blackmore’s Rainbow, Rainbow Rising, Long Live Rock & Roll, Heaven & Hell, The Mob Rules and Holy Diver. 3 different bands, pretty impressive.


JimSheridan - 6/20/2019 at 04:57 AM

As we know from being fans of rock music over a very long period of time, generally from the mid 1960s until now, we have to pay some serious respect.

When a band has a classic line-up but then goes through a major change, losing an iconic member, it is so hard to get a follow-up sound or album that is adequate. As a Who fan, I know that a lot of the magic left with Keith Moon. As a Genesis fan, I know that once Hackett and Gabriel were out, I lost a lot of interest.

But "Heaven and Hell" is an AMAZING album, really strong and consistent, and also sonically updated for a new era of hard rock.

I guess "Back in Black" is its peer in terms of pulling that off, but it is the exception to the rule.


StratDal - 6/21/2019 at 12:08 AM

quote:
I have often said that the break up of Black Sabbath at that time was really a blessing one of the best things to happen to hard rock/heavy metal as we got IMO two of the very best heavy metal albums of all time. Still love both of those records!



Well said! When Heaven And Hell came out in 1980, I really think it kick started a lot of the metal bands (good or bad) in the 80s.

When the H&H lineup reformed and toured about 10+ years ago, Tony, Geezer, and Bill loved it. It was a chance to play different songs and kick some ass. I have a dvd/cd set from that tour and it's a blast to watch and listen too. During Voodoo, you can see the band is having fun.

Of course I wussed out and didn't go see them perform that tour (at least I did in 1982).

[Edited on 6/21/2019 by StratDal]


jszfunk - 6/21/2019 at 12:51 AM

Don't forget the other results that were produce during that era of Ozzy leaving Sab. Blizzard of Oz and Diary of A Madman were pretty important.


hotlantatim - 6/25/2019 at 04:47 PM

Ozzy with Sabbath were not going to be able to work together again.....despite a very underrated Never Say Die album after a weak & strange Technical Ecstasy album.

I've said it here before, but that breakup lead to 4 all-time classic hard rock albums - Blizzard of Ozz, Diary of a Madman, Heave & Hell, and Mob Rules. And two interesting live albums, but not really classics.

When Dio died (RIP)and Sabbath was on their farewell tour with Ozzy, I had a dream that Heaven & Hell would grab Chris Cornell (RIP) for a tour or some festivals. He could have nailed the Dio era material. That wasn't meant to be.


JimSheridan - 6/26/2019 at 02:50 AM

I'll ask an Iommi question that I hope is not seen as irreverent.


I know that Tony often cited Alvin Lee as an influence, and Alvin was a real shredder. Tony certainly had his shred moments at times over 1969-1977.

However, more often than not, a lot of Iommi solos had very memorable lead lines. He was a big fan of Hank Marvin, whose instrumental band often had big thick melodic lead lines in their crazy surf tunes. Black Sabbath was not a surf band, but when I think of some of their great solos from back in the day, Iommi would often begin and end the solos with big thick memorable melodic lines: War Pigs, Iron Man, NIB - as was often said of George Harrison's solos, you could sing them.

That was not always the case with Iommi in the 80s and beyond. He got a thinner tone in the 1980s, too distorted to have good thickness, but he also went to full-on shred very often rather than crafting a memorable "hook" for his solos. The Black Sabbath song "Turn Up the Night" on Mob Rules is the precursor to what he started doing: a whole lotta hammering without a hook.

Do you think that seeing Van Halen open for Sabbath in 1978 and apparently blow Sabbath off the stage got Iommi to change his style?


StratDal - 6/26/2019 at 03:40 AM

quote:
I'll ask an Iommi question that I hope is not seen as irreverent.


I know that Tony often cited Alvin Lee as an influence, and Alvin was a real shredder. Tony certainly had his shred moments at times over 1969-1977.

However, more often than not, a lot of Iommi solos had very memorable lead lines. He was a big fan of Hank Marvin, whose instrumental band often had big thick melodic lead lines in their crazy surf tunes. Black Sabbath was not a surf band, but when I think of some of their great solos from back in the day, Iommi would often begin and end the solos with big thick memorable melodic lines: War Pigs, Iron Man, NIB - as was often said of George Harrison's solos, you could sing them.

That was not always the case with Iommi in the 80s and beyond. He got a thinner tone in the 1980s, too distorted to have good thickness, but he also went to full-on shred very often rather than crafting a memorable "hook" for his solos. The Black Sabbath song "Turn Up the Night" on Mob Rules is the precursor to what he started doing: a whole lotta hammering without a hook.

Do you think that seeing Van Halen open for Sabbath in 1978 and apparently blow Sabbath off the stage got Iommi to change his style?


If I remember correctly from his book, he was asked to play faster solos/style by RJD. Personally, I dig his solo on Turn Up The Night especially when he changes pace. As I once posted similar about Gregg Allman, Tony could play the phonebook and I'd enjoy it.


hotlantatim - 6/26/2019 at 03:53 PM

Even though I consider H&H and Mob Rules timeless heavy classics, Iommi did overdue the shredding. I bet Eddie and plus some of the newer Brits were an influence. He was going with a new approach in lots of ways with Sabbath with RJD.


jszfunk - 6/26/2019 at 04:49 PM

quote:
Even though I consider H&H and Mob Rules timeless heavy classics, Iommi did overdue the shredding. I bet Eddie and plus some of the newer Brits were an influence. He was going with a new approach in lots of ways with Sabbath with RJD.


The song writing did change for sure with RJD vs the Ozzy years no doubt.

I know it got alot of criticism, but I liked Dehumanizer. Devil You Know was very solid and I enjoy listening to it.
I wonder if there is any material leftover from the DIO years that will ever surface?

Slipping Away
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Wd8j3A1oxIE


jszfunk - 6/26/2019 at 05:28 PM

Geezer is in a new band called Deadland Ritual with Matt Sorum,Steve Stevens and Frankie Perez.

Broken and Bruised
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=RUPp6fD7Jco

Down In Flames
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ep5NHWELz04


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