Thread: Jim Plunkett's Painful Journey "My life sucks"

pops42 - 8/6/2017 at 04:04 PM

http://www.mercurynews.com/2017/08/04/jim-plunketts-painful-journey-my-life -sucks/?utm_term=Autofeed&utm_campaign=Echobox&utm_medium=Social&am p;utm_source=Twitter#link_time=1501855737


Fretsman - 8/6/2017 at 04:52 PM

Those guys took a beating. There was a prideful savagery for the defensive players, the shots the QB's took looking downfield and WR's took while looking back for the ball were ugly at times, They'd hit you then land on you full weight trying to break bones. The no more teeing off on defenseless players is a good thing and keeps the stars in the game. I read the article and scrolled through the comments and thought how often the comments section can be more entertaining the story itself?


robslob - 8/6/2017 at 06:44 PM

That is really a crying shame........it made my joints ache just reading that. I remember how shocked everyone was when Plunkett revived a completely dead career by winning two Super Bowl with the Raiders. All this.......and he says it would be cool if his 5 year old grandson plays football? Really now Jim......

I can thank my Dad that I never played. We had the stereotype macho idiot coaches at my high school, pretty typical of the early 70's. I was a 6'4" 205 lb very athletic 17 year old basketball player. The coaches wanted me......BAD. One of the practice drills they were using? The "nutcracker" drill, where two guys face off and ram head first into each other until one of them collapses. Mike Singletary used it in his short tenure as 49ers coach. It was supposed to toughen guys up. One neurologist while Singletary was there came out publicly against this, saying it was pure idiocy and the potential for a brain or spinal cord injury was high.

THANKS DAD.

[Edited on 8/6/2017 by robslob]


wearly89 - 8/6/2017 at 07:29 PM

Did someone force him to play football? Was he somehow victimized because he was too stupid to realize there would be consequences to playing a violent game for so long? Did he forget to get paid while he was playing? Sorry, but it's all on him as far as I am concerned. I am sick and tired of these big crybabies coming out and blaming the NFL. And I have been a Raider fan ever since I saw Jim Otto wearing #00 back in the AFL. I was a big fan of Plunkett's, but no more. Have some dignity, you big whiner. If you want your family to be provided for, then do it yourself or you should have done it yourself. You made plenty of money playing football and you should have saved and invested prudently. Don't blame the NFL if you failed to do it. Jerk.


robslob - 8/7/2017 at 12:47 AM

quote:

Did someone force him to play football? Was he somehow victimized because he was too stupid to realize there would be consequences to playing a violent game for so long? Did he forget to get paid while he was playing? Sorry, but it's all on him as far as I am concerned. I am sick and tired of these big crybabies coming out and blaming the NFL. And I have been a Raider fan ever since I saw Jim Otto wearing #00 back in the AFL. I was a big fan of Plunkett's, but no more. Have some dignity, you big whiner. If you want your family to be provided for, then do it yourself or you should have done it yourself. You made plenty of money playing football and you should have saved and invested prudently. Don't blame the NFL if you failed to do it. Jerk.


I think that's a bit severe. No one knew back then the severe risks of playing.........the information about what football does to the brain just was NOT out there when Plunkett was playing. Have some sympathy for Christ's sake...........you say you used to be a "big fan of Plunkett's" ........he sacrificed his body so you could enjoy countless hours on the sofa swilling, eating chips and being entertained...........now you write him off that easily? Glad I'm not an athlete with "fans" like you.


wearly89 - 8/7/2017 at 04:55 AM

quote:
quote:

I think that's a bit severe. No one knew back then the severe risks of playing.........the information about what football does to the brain just was NOT out there when Plunkett was playing. Have some sympathy for Christ's sake...........you say you used to be a "big fan of Plunkett's" ........he sacrificed his body so you could enjoy countless hours on the sofa swilling, eating chips and being entertained...........now you write him off that easily? Glad I'm not an athlete with "fans" like you.


Oh, would you please teach me to be as holy as thou? We all make choices good and bad and most people have to live with them, but not these class action crybabies. I sympathize with Plunkett's health plight but he made his choices and risked his health for the current economic benefits he received and he did know the there would probably be health consequences for that decision. Way on down the list of reasons for his career choice was his concern for my entertainment. He made his choice. made a lot of money and is now in pain. I don't think the NFL forced him to play and therefore do not believe they should be responsible for providing for his family if he had concussions. I think he's acting like he's been victimized and that he's pretending he's not responsible for his own decision to enter a dangerous careeer. They paid him very well to do his job but now weenies like him are going to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs and it pisses me off because football is something I enjoyed participating in long ago and watching now. I chose a safer but lower paying career and today I feel and look pretty damned good at age 61 and my life doesn't suck at all right now like Plunkett's. However I was never rich, never adored by legions of fans, and never received all the special treatment that a professional athlete receives. By the way, I used to work closely with a guy who was defensive captain for a two time Super Bowl runner up. Trust me, he never would attend any meeting without that gawdy Super Bowl ring on his hand which no one could fail to notice. The wearer of one of those rings if he has any sense at all will receive more business economic benefits because of who he is after his playing career than he ever made playing football so Plunkett should not be depending on the NFL to bail out his family now.

Hope you're glad to be a nobody trying to pose like he's somebody better than me.


bird72 - 8/7/2017 at 03:37 PM

/

It is just coming to light about brain damage to football athletes. Plunkett played decades ago.

The NFL didn't look out for their players medically and inspired them to go at risk. Plunkett took some bad hits toward the end when his mobility was not there. Sure he made a bad choise going on in his career.

I think your disdain for apparently sports and successful people is showing. Lots of athletes wear championship rings at times. Your name calling of a gentleman is poor form.


pops42 - 8/7/2017 at 04:02 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:

I think that's a bit severe. No one knew back then the severe risks of playing.........the information about what football does to the brain just was NOT out there when Plunkett was playing. Have some sympathy for Christ's sake...........you say you used to be a "big fan of Plunkett's" ........he sacrificed his body so you could enjoy countless hours on the sofa swilling, eating chips and being entertained...........now you write him off that easily? Glad I'm not an athlete with "fans" like you.


Oh, would you please teach me to be as holy as thou? We all make choices good and bad and most people have to live with them, but not these class action crybabies. I sympathize with Plunkett's health plight but he made his choices and risked his health for the current economic benefits he received and he did know the there would probably be health consequences for that decision. Way on down the list of reasons for his career choice was his concern for my entertainment. He made his choice. made a lot of money and is now in pain. I don't think the NFL forced him to play and therefore do not believe they should be responsible for providing for his family if he had concussions. I think he's acting like he's been victimized and that he's pretending he's not responsible for his own decision to enter a dangerous careeer. They paid him very well to do his job but now weenies like him are going to kill the goose that lays the golden eggs and it pisses me off because football is something I enjoyed participating in long ago and watching now. I chose a safer but lower paying career and today I feel and look pretty damned good at age 61 and my life doesn't suck at all right now like Plunkett's. However I was never rich, never adored by legions of fans, and never received all the special treatment that a professional athlete receives. By the way, I used to work closely with a guy who was defensive captain for a two time Super Bowl runner up. Trust me, he never would attend any meeting without that gawdy Super Bowl ring on his hand which no one could fail to notice. The wearer of one of those rings if he has any sense at all will receive more business economic benefits because of who he is after his playing career than he ever made playing football so Plunkett should not be depending on the NFL to bail out his family now.

Hope you're glad to be a nobody trying to pose like he's somebody better than me.

Walk a mile in his shoes before you judge the man.


kevdab - 8/7/2017 at 04:49 PM

The Plunkett I remember was a class act. When the Patriots were a laughing stock, he gave us hope. He took a beating. He always got up. I always rooted for him after he left the Pat's. When he played 40 something years ago, the game was more violent and they did less to protect the players. It didn't sound like he was whining in the article. I think he's just a guy with some regrets about all the injuries that will be with him always.


wearly89 - 8/7/2017 at 05:32 PM

quote:
/

It is just coming to light about brain damage to football athletes. Plunkett played decades ago.

The NFL didn't look out for their players medically and inspired them to go at risk. Plunkett took some bad hits toward the end when his mobility was not there. Sure he made a bad choise going on in his career.

I think your disdain for apparently sports and successful people is showing. Lots of athletes wear championship rings at times. Your name calling of a gentleman is poor form.


As usual, you blather on a subject about which you know nothing. I admire successful, self reliant, wealthy people and certainly have no disdain whatsoever in that regard for anyone's success. You are an idiot if you think NFL players haven't known the level of health risk involved in getting their brains bashed in week in and week out for years running.No one made Plunkett play that extremely dangerous sport professionally. The NFL is not or should not be the nanny of it's players. That's nonsensical moronic group think.

By the way, did you know that if you engage in stock car racing you might get in a wreck? It's really true. And if you play football with the graded out meanest toughest people on the planet, you actually might get concussions. I understood that when I was about 8 years old.

[Edited on 8/7/2017 by wearly89]


Bhawk - 8/7/2017 at 06:04 PM

This guy needs to stop whining too...

http://www.sfgate.com/sports/article/Otto-paid-big-price-for-football-glory -3262920.php


Wayne - 8/7/2017 at 06:24 PM

quote:
quote:
/

It is just coming to light about brain damage to football athletes. Plunkett played decades ago.

The NFL didn't look out for their players medically and inspired them to go at risk. Plunkett took some bad hits toward the end when his mobility was not there. Sure he made a bad choise going on in his career.

I think your disdain for apparently sports and successful people is showing. Lots of athletes wear championship rings at times. Your name calling of a gentleman is poor form.




As usual, you blather on a subject about which you know nothing. I admire successful, self reliant, wealthy people and certainly have no disdain whatsoever in that regard for anyone's success. You are an idiot if you think NFL players haven't known the level of health risk involved in getting their brains bashed in week in and week out for years running.No one made Plunkett play that extremely dangerous sport professionally. The NFL is not or should not be the nanny of it's players. That's nonsensical moronic group think.

By the way, did you know that if you engage in stock car racing you might get in a wreck? It's really true. And if you play football with the graded out meanest toughest people on the planet, you actually might get concussions. I understood that when I was about 8 years old.

[Edited on 8/7/2017 by wearly89]


wearly89, you remind of Rick Tomilson from the original site, if you were around on the original site you will know what i am talking about.

[Edited on 8/7/2017 by Wayne]


pops42 - 8/7/2017 at 06:42 PM

Jim Plunkett is a class act. A malcontent from a music website forum won't change that fact.


bobbysuede - 8/7/2017 at 06:50 PM

So you're pissed cause "weenies" like Plunkett are gonna ruin a game you like to watch?
I guess we're all idiots because no one knew about the dangers of the game in the 80's.

Jim Plunkett was and continues to be a class act.
Wearly89 not so much.

But at least you look good!



[Edited on 8/7/2017 by bobbysuede]


fensranger - 8/7/2017 at 07:05 PM

football is going to be toned down over the years to try to protect players. That being said, it is not going away as the guys who play now know the risks and in almost all instances they will continue to partake.

i love the game but if it went away because nobody wants to play so be it. I certainly am in awe over those who play the game but personally way to rough for me to ever want to play something like this.

Like most people i have had a few concussions through my life and they are scary and to think these guys played while still have effects is amazing to me. I could hardly focus on anything and was scared to death of what i was feeling for several days.

I am a big hockey fan and the game has been toned down a little via some rule changes but IMO it is a better game to watch in many respects.

I feel bad for Jim Plunkett and everyone else with permanent scars from the sport.

that being said, i seriously doubt many of these guys would have changed their occupations if they were playing today


heineken515 - 8/7/2017 at 07:07 PM

A sensible comment fensranger, thank you.

Now, back to attacking the other member for his opinion....


jszfunk - 8/7/2017 at 10:59 PM

quote:
no one knew about the dangers of the game in the 80's.

Jim Plunkett was and continues to be a class act.
Wearly89 not so much.

But at least you look good!



[Edited on 8/7/2017 by bobbysuede] [/quote.]

Yeah, no one knew about and it's all coming to light now. I know there are law suits against the NFL from former players ,but I am not sure the league should be liable. ?That's another topic.

I always liked Plunkett.

I wonder what Andrew Luck is going to feel like In his later years. That guy has taken a beating his first 5 years in the league. I think he has been sacked and hit more than any other qb during that time frame.


PhotoRon286 - 8/7/2017 at 11:44 PM

quote:
So you're pissed cause "weenies" like Plunkett are gonna ruin a game you like to watch?
I guess we're all idiots because no one knew about the dangers of the game in the 80's.

Jim Plunkett was and continues to be a class act.
Wearly89 not so much.

But at least you look good!



Damn straight.

The lack of empathy or compassion sounds downright trumpian.


StratDal - 8/7/2017 at 11:50 PM

I'm sorry that Mr. Plunkett is dealing with many health issues as I do any fellow citizen. Ultimately it comes down to choice. He could have used his Stanford education to pursue another career if he wanted to but he chose NFL football instead. He's paying a price for that decision as do other people for theirs.


shep66 - 8/8/2017 at 01:50 AM

quote:
football is going to be toned down over the years to try to protect players. That being said, it is not going away as the guys who play now know the risks and in almost all instances they will continue to partake.

i love the game but if it went away because nobody wants to play so be it. I certainly am in awe over those who play the game but personally way to rough for me to ever want to play something like this.

Like most people i have had a few concussions through my life and they are scary and to think these guys played while still have effects is amazing to me. I could hardly focus on anything and was scared to death of what i was feeling for several days.

I am a big hockey fan and the game has been toned down a little via some rule changes but IMO it is a better game to watch in many respects.
I feel bad for Jim Plunkett and everyone else with permanent scars from the sport.

that being said, i seriously doubt many of these guys would have changed their occupations if they were playing today


Let's face facts, money drives football. It's arguably bigger than ever today. Having said that, there are ways to minimize the damage done by the way the game is played today without taking away the entertainment value.

I too love Hockey, but the game today has become very bland. Physicality is essential to the sport. They need to teach the players how to play with a physical edge, while not making contact with the head, or hitting from behind. While the game could be barbaric at times in the past, the physical contact no doubt contributed to rivalries being built between division foes and then during playoff series.

I hope that the changes that are put in place don't take out the passion that is integral to both of these sports.


wearly89 - 8/8/2017 at 02:43 AM

quote:
quote:
So you're pissed cause "weenies" like Plunkett are gonna ruin a game you like to watch?
I guess we're all idiots because no one knew about the dangers of the game in the 80's.

Jim Plunkett was and continues to be a class act.
Wearly89 not so much.

But at least you look good!



Damn straight.

The lack of empathy or compassion sounds downright trumpian.


Ron, you are someone I respect and like and I do look pretty good but as I said in my second post, I do sympathize with Plunkett's current state of health. However, he is responsible for his decision to engage in one of the most dangerous professions in the world and I do not admire his wanting the NFL to bear financial responsibility for his health now. Unless you are obtuse or dimwitted, it has always been known to all how dangerous the professional game is and the level of competition has always been savage. Again, the danger has always been there and the participants have always entered the fray willingly and they received satisfacory competition for so doing. Now if that sounds Trumpian or or is an overload of common sense, I do apologize. You open minded people do not seem to welcome certain points of view.


wearly89 - 8/8/2017 at 03:00 AM

quote:
This guy needs to stop whining too...

http://www.sfgate.com/sports/article/Otto-paid-big-price-for-football-glory -3262920.php


Thank you for posting this. Jim Otto doesn't whine, is self reliant, and provided successfully for himself and his family. That's a real class act. After football he worked to provide for his own health insurance. Imagine that! He never whined or felt sorry for himself and he doesn't blame the NFL for his health because he realized the toll that his decision to play professional football was taking on his body during the entire time he played as does every man who plays past and present. That's a true hero and a real American patriot!


BIGV - 8/8/2017 at 05:16 PM

quote:
Did someone force him to play football?


Exactly. Do Fireman know the risks?...Policemen?...Boxers?.....Welders?

You choose your path in life....Especially when $$$ is concerned,

While I have empathy for Mr. Plunkett's situation, I have little sympathy


Bhawk - 8/8/2017 at 05:35 PM

quote:
quote:
This guy needs to stop whining too...

http://www.sfgate.com/sports/article/Otto-paid-big-price-for-football-glory -3262920.php


Thank you for posting this. Jim Otto doesn't whine, is self reliant, and provided successfully for himself and his family. That's a real class act. After football he worked to provide for his own health insurance. Imagine that! He never whined or felt sorry for himself and he doesn't blame the NFL for his health because he realized the toll that his decision to play professional football was taking on his body during the entire time he played as does every man who plays past and present. That's a true hero and a real American patriot!


quote:
quote:
This guy needs to stop whining too...

http://www.sfgate.com/sports/article/Otto-paid-big-price-for-football-glory -3262920.php


Thank you for posting this. Jim Otto doesn't whine, is self reliant, and provided successfully for himself and his family. That's a real class act. After football he worked to provide for his own health insurance. Imagine that! He never whined or felt sorry for himself and he doesn't blame the NFL for his health because he realized the toll that his decision to play professional football was taking on his body during the entire time he played as does every man who plays past and present. That's a true hero and a real American patriot!


Well, actually, doctors started noticing that boxers were "punch-drunk" in the 1920s, but the conventional wisdom held that it only affected boxers because of repeated punches to the head.

It wasn't until 2005 that there was a serious medical study and paper written on CTE and the connection between repeated blows to the head and the development of tau protein in the brain, which causes devastating medical effects, up to and including pain, dementia, suicide, a complete living hell for those who live with those with CTE and in some select cases, a factor in murder.

The NFL has already admitted culpability for the decades of enabling a culture where repeated blows to the head were simply blown off as "getting your bell rung," or, benching or releasing players that wouldn't "play through pain." Because of that culture, players would not tell coaches or trainers what they were experiencing.

Now, of course, injuries to arms, legs, knees, feet, hands, fingers, shoulders...one might expect such things when you play football. I think everyone would agree that those are risks. These things that are going on with the head, though, no one knew the real seriousness, not even the medical community.

Why did the NFL agree to the huge settlement? Well, look at it this way. Say you worked at a printing or chemical company for 30 years. There was a chemical or fume that you knew was present and the company said it was harmless. You get diagnosed with cancer that is linked to what you were exposed to. All on you because you knew all the risks of working there, or did you?

Point being, CTE and the damages of tau protein were not known when a lot of guys were playing. Took a lot of guys to commit suicide to see what what going on. As of right now, CTE can only be diagnosed after death.

The AMA released a study this year that stated that of 111 players that had donated their brains to science after they died, 110 of those brains showed signs of CTE.

At least we know that those guys won't be around to whine about it anymore. The other good thing here is that very few players have actually collected any money from the settlement, so there's that to be happy about.


porkchopbob - 8/8/2017 at 05:36 PM

quote:
While I have empathy for Mr. Plunkett's situation, I have little sympathy


He's not asking for it. I'm not really sure why everyone is getting so upset, especially all of the finger wagging towards Plunkett. I'm assuming some people here just didn't read the article and made assumptions from the headline. Plunkett isn't claiming to be a victim, just stating the fact that he's concerned for his body and his mind after years of getting knocked around - the 1970s was a brutal period for the game.

I'm a big NFL fan, but there's no reason to get angry at Plunkett. For those who obviously didn't read the article, here's a few highlights:

-"Everybody hurts at our age. We just hurt more."

- "After everything he has endured, Plunkett wants to help educate teenage football players on how to deal with head injuries....He wants to help make football safer so it doesn’t disappear because of fears over concussions. Plunkett even hopes his 5-year-old grandson wants to play."


bobbysuede - 8/8/2017 at 09:59 PM

quote:
quote:
quote:
So you're pissed cause "weenies" like Plunkett are gonna ruin a game you like to watch?
I guess we're all idiots because no one knew about the dangers of the game in the 80's.

Jim Plunkett was and continues to be a class act.
Wearly89 not so much.

But at least you look good!



Damn straight.

The lack of empathy or compassion sounds downright trumpian.


Ron, you are someone I respect and like and I do look pretty good but as I said in my second post, I do sympathize with Plunkett's current state of health. However, he is responsible for his decision to engage in one of the most dangerous professions in the world and I do not admire his wanting the NFL to bear financial responsibility for his health now. Unless you are obtuse or dimwitted, it has always been known to all how dangerous the professional game is and the level of competition has always been savage. Again, the danger has always been there and the participants have always entered the fray willingly and they received satisfacory competition for so doing. Now if that sounds Trumpian or or is an overload of common sense, I do apologize. You open minded people do not seem to welcome certain points of view.


You may be entitled to your opinion, but not your facts. You say, after some insults,"it has always been known to all how dangerous the professional game is....". Simply not true!!!!!! Very few if any people brought up the problems that could occur after a career in football.
I believe the N.F.L. made 12 billion last year alone. The average salary in 1980 was $78,657, for qb's $160,000. Hardly the money being made today. No one is asking for YOU to pay. I don't think anyone is asking for your pity. You just sound like a bitter old man. Take care of the people who helped build your game!! The owners can afford this! Make the N.F.L. great again!!!


Buzzy82 - 8/9/2017 at 01:40 AM

As an ex college football player, had I known that there was a high risk of permanent brain damage, it sure would have made me look differently on my decision to play the sport. Granted it is a high impact sport that could result in a serious injury on every play. However, getting your bell rung was chalked up to a good hit; not a precursor to a life altering condition. Given the fact that the NFL went to great lengths to hide and lie about the facts; I fully understand the frustration and anger displayed by former players. Armed with the FACTS, players may have made different career decisions. Case in point is the amount of players retiring at a very young age over the past 2 years.

Last and certainly not least, who goes on to a music website and brags about how good they still look . I harken back to a well repeated piece of advice from the days of old on this website; Don"t feed the trolls! "



robslob - 8/9/2017 at 02:47 AM

quote:

Last and certainly not least, who goes on to a music website and brags about how good they still look


Only a certain twisted individual who has posted in this thread and also claims to be a big Jim Plunkett fan.


wearly89 - 8/9/2017 at 03:13 AM

quote:
quote:

Last and certainly not least, who goes on to a music website and brags about how good they still look


Only a certain twisted individual who has posted in this thread and also claims to be a big Jim Plunkett fan.


Is there a prohibition on jocularity around here? You take yourself too seriously, dear slob. The fact is, I don't look that great - not much better than Robert Redford at my age.

Anyway, the underlying point of all of this is that the NFL probably can't continue to operate on a profitable basis if it has to payoff every player who has ever had a concussion. Could we possibly agree that is a huge liability and if the head injury nazis are successful they will do class action lawsuits for every type of common injury and broke ex players will start coming up out of the woodwork with every kind of feigned post career trauma imaginable. That's where we're headed. I am a football fan so I don't want that great American tradition to end.

That's all I've got to say about this and I apologize to all offended. From the very beginning, the responses to me were personally insulting and I sludged down to slob's level and responded in kind. To make ammends, I offer to buy slob a new bra.

[Edited on 8/9/2017 by wearly89]


robslob - 8/9/2017 at 03:17 AM

quote:

I offer to buy slob a new bra


Now I'm ALL excited you gorgeous 61 year old hunk


Lee - 8/9/2017 at 12:31 PM

Plunkett doesn't seem to be bitching, just saying what state he is in. As any longtime football fan knows, now we do know a lot more. Back in the day, the info wasn't out there. Whether the NFL and/or owners knew of the dangers, I have no clue.

One of my very best friends is older than me and his dad played eight years for the Chicago Cardinals.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jack_Jennings

My friend swears that football caused his early death. Jack was going through all sorts of mental issues toward the end. I asked my friend if his dad knew what we now know, would it have changed his decision to play the game. My friend didn't bat an eye. "Hell no, it wouldn't have mattered. He still would have played".

I guess we all make our own decisions. When I was a kid, just about to enter junior high school, I was all ready to play organized tackle football. Then I had a screwdriver thrown through my knee in a freak accident. After a week in the hospital I was getting ready to head to my first training camp. My doctor told me if I got hit by a helmet in the knee, I might never walk again. Never played football again.

Not the same as head trauma, but I think the similarity is apt. Stuck to baseball & basketball for 10 years. Even at a young age, the thought of never walking again scared the s*it out of me.

Having said all of that, I have no problem with guys playing, not playing and nowadays, retiring early. They made their money. Leave with your faculties. No problem with that.


porkchopbob - 8/9/2017 at 12:47 PM

quote:
Anyway, the underlying point of all of this is that the NFL probably can't continue to operate on a profitable basis if it has to payoff every player who has ever had a concussion. Could we possibly agree that is a huge liability and if the head injury nazis are successful they will do class action lawsuits for every type of common injury and broke ex players will start coming up out of the woodwork with every kind of feigned post career trauma imaginable. That's where we're headed. I am a football fan so I don't want that great American tradition to end.



If you read the article, you know that Plunkett hasn't been one to complain. But only now, after decades of increasing physical health issues that were likely caused by years of getting knocked around, his wife encouraged him to fill out paperwork in order to take part of the settlement that was decided 2 years ago. This isn't a new case.

If you're a football fan, you can't begrudge some of these guys that made the league in the 1960s and 70s getting some money from a business that gets free stadiums from tax payers. I grew up in WI, no bigger NFL state that there, but a lot of people knew about local hero Mike Webster long before all of this CTE stuff broke. You can love the league and still support some of these old timers, and as I mentioned before, Plunkett is still an advocate for the sport.


Lee - 8/9/2017 at 01:26 PM

Mike Webster is a terribly sad story. I think he was supposedly he living under a bridge toward the end. Living in Chicago, unfortunately I see that too often.

Who knows if Junior Seau & Dave Duerson's suicides were because of football. Could have been something else I guess. Not a neurologist. Robin Williams killed himself. Wasn't a football player.

Playing Devil's advocate I suppose.




bird72 - 8/9/2017 at 01:53 PM

Wearly is on my Manual Ignore list. Anyone who can't discuss without grade school insults is not worth my time. Have a great life angry man!


RobJohnson - 8/11/2017 at 03:43 AM

"it has always been known to all how dangerous the professional game is"

This is absolutely false. In fact......

"the NFL went to great lengths to hide and lie about the facts"

Do you think they settled that huge lawsuit out of the goodness of their heart? Come on, man. The NFL's hands are dirty on this, plain and simple.

I'm a football fan and love the physical nature of the game. I think that by now, every football player should have a clear idea of what they are getting into. Many of them still choose to put their lives on the line for our entertainment, but at least they are much better compensated nowadays. They are also much better taken care of medically and don't get told to "suck it up" when they get a concussion.

Today, Luke Keuchly gets a concussion and is held out for half the year. Back in Plunkett's day they wouldn't have even taken him out of the game.


PhotoRon286 - 8/11/2017 at 12:18 PM

quote:
quote:

I offer to buy slob a new bra


Now I'm ALL excited you gorgeous 61 year old hunk


Well that was an unexpected turn.

Personally I think the NFL should put more money into taking care of retired players from the pre-concussion knowledge era, if that makes sense.

The NFL hid or downplayed studies on long term effects for years.


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